Course on shakespeare lane 448 introduction
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Course on shakespeare lane 448 introduction

on

  • 771 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
771
Views on SlideShare
771
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Course on shakespeare lane 448 introduction Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  Section: BA 01C Room: 201 A Lecture Time & Days: Sunday 8:00 – 9 :20 Tuesday 8:00 – 9:20
  • 2. Dr. Fawzia AseelOffice: Room 108 AOffice Hours: Sunday 9:30 - 11:00 Monday 10:30 - 12:30 Tuesday 9:30 - 10:30 Wednesday 8:00 - 10:00Email: Rawda_d@ Yahoo.com
  • 3. Widely regarded asthe greatest writer inEnglish Literature
  • 4. 1563-1616Stratford-on-Avon, Englandwrote 37 playsabout 154 sonnetsstarted out as an actor
  • 5. Actor for Lord Chamberlain’s Men (London theater co.)Also > principal playwright for them1599> Lord Ch. Co. built Globe Theater where most of Sh. Play’s were performed
  • 6. ComediesHistoriesTragedies
  • 7. Plays produced for the general publicRoofless>open airNo artificial lightingCourtyard surrounded by 3 levels of galleries
  • 8. Wealthy got benches“Groundlings”>poorer people stood and watched from the courtyard (“pit”)All but wealthy were uneducated/illiterateMuch more interaction than today
  • 9. Stage>platform that extended into the pitDressing & storage rooms in galleries behind & above stagesecond-level gallery> upper stage> famous balcony scene in Romeo & JulietTrap door>ghosts“Heavens”> angelic beings
  • 10. Only men and boysYoung boys whose voices had not changed play women’s rolesWould have been considered indecent for a woman to appear on stage
  • 11. An , and: IfAnon: At once - SoonAy: YesBut: Only - Except forE’en: EvenE’er: EverExeunt: They go out( leave stage)Exit: He , She goes out
  • 12. Haply: PerhapsHappy: FortunateHence: Away, from herMarry: IndeedMethinks: I thinkNay: NoPray : Please
  • 13. Thou ,Thee ,Thy , Thine : You, Your, YoursWhence: WhereWilt: Will, will youWithal: In addition toWould: WishYea : Yes
  • 14. Ordinary writing that is notpoetry, drama, or song Only characters in the lower social classes speak this way in Shakespeare’s plays Why do you suppose that is?
  • 15. Thesequence ofevents in aliterary work
  • 16. The plot usually beginswith this:introduces>>>> setting characters basic situation
  • 17. Oftencalled “initialincident”the first bit of action that occurs and which begins the plot
  • 18. Thestruggle thatdevelopsman vs. manman vs. himselfman vs. societyman vs. nature
  • 19. The point where theprotagonist’s situationwill either get better orworseprotagonist>good characterantagonist>bad character
  • 20. The turning point ofthe story>everythingbegins to unravelfrom hereThus begins the falling action
  • 21. The end of thecentral conflict
  • 22. The final explanationor outcome of the plotIf this is included in literature, it will occur after the resolution.
  • 23. Drama where the centralcharacter/s suffer disaster/greatmisfortune  In many tragedies, downfall results from> Fate Character flaw/Fatal flaw Combination of the two
  • 24. Central idea orInsight about lifewhich explains thedownfall
  • 25. Characters whohave manypersonality traits,like real people.
  • 26. One-dimensional,embodying only a singletraitShakespeare often uses them to provide comic relief even in a tragedy
  • 27. Characters within astory who remain thesame. They do notchange. They do notchange their minds,opinions or character.
  • 28. Characters thatchange somehowduring the course ofthe plot. Theygenerally change forthe better.
  • 29. Oneperson speaking onstage > may be othercharacter on stage too
  • 30. Long speech expressingthe thoughts of acharacter alone onstage. Macbeth gives asoliloquy after themurder of King Duncan.
  • 31. Words spoken, usually in anundertone not intended tobe heard by all characters.In The Merchant of VeniceShylock’s Asides are veryimportant to the spectators asthey explain the reasons of hisrevenge on Antonio.
  • 32. Shakespeare loved to usethem!!!Humorous use of a word with two meanings > sometimes missed by the reader because of Elizabethan language .
  • 33. Words that tell the reader who is being addressed:“Ah, my mistresses, which of you all/ Will now deny to dance?”
  • 34. Acontradictionbetween what acharacter thinks andwhat thereader/audienceknows to be true
  • 35. Words used to suggestthe opposite of what ismeant
  • 36. An event occurs thatdirectly contradicts theexpectations of thecharacters, the reader,or the audience
  • 37. Use of comedy within literaturethat is NOT comedy to provide“relief” from seriousness orsadness.In MACBETH look for moments ofcomic relief that help “relieve” thetragedy of the situation
  • 38. 1. Macbeth A Tragedy by William Shakespeare2. The Taming of the Shrew A Farce by William Shakespeare
  • 39.  1.A.C. Bradley. Shakespearean Tragedy . Hong Kong: The Macmillan Press Ltd, 1978 2. Anthony Burgess. English Literature . London : Longman, 1974 3.Caroline Spurgeon. Shakespeare’s Imagery . London :Cambridge University Press, 1982 4. Peter Spalding. Drama in Practice. London : Macmillan Publishers Ltd.1985
  • 40.  Participation:5 marks Power Point Presentation: 20 marks Test: 20 marks Sunday 29/ 4 / 1432 H Quiz: 15 marks Tuesday 21/ 6/ 1432 H Final: 40 marks Total: 100 marks
  • 41. Wishing You a SuccessfulAcademic Term