Tornadoes
What is a Tornado? <ul><li>“ A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending between, and in contact with, a clo...
How do they form? <ul><li>Warm, moist air that meets cold air and dry air can create thunderstorms which have the possibil...
How strong are they? <ul><li>Tornadoes are measured in strength by the Enhanced Fujita Scale. </li></ul><ul><li>Damage hel...
Enhanced Fujita Scale http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_Fujita_Scale Scale Wind Speed   (MPH) Damage Caused EF0 65-85 ...
Where do they occur? <ul><li>Tornadoes can be formed anywhere in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>They mostly are form...
Tornado Alley http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate/research/tornado/stalley.gif
Tornado Watch <ul><li>There is a possibility that a tornado might form; listen for future weather updates. </li></ul>http:...
Tornado Warning <ul><li>A tornado has been detected visually or on radar. Head to safety. </li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/ha...
Tornado Safety Tips <ul><li>If you see a tornado or hear the tornado siren immediately head to a basement or to the lowest...
Tornado Video <ul><li>Tornado Video </li></ul>
Tornado
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Tornado

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Tornado

  1. 1. Tornadoes
  2. 2. What is a Tornado? <ul><li>“ A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending between, and in contact with, a cloud and the surface of the earth.” </li></ul>http://www.weather.com/ready/tornado/index.html
  3. 3. How do they form? <ul><li>Warm, moist air that meets cold air and dry air can create thunderstorms which have the possibility of producing tornadoes. </li></ul><ul><li>The exact way tornadoes are formed are unknown. </li></ul>http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/
  4. 4. How strong are they? <ul><li>Tornadoes are measured in strength by the Enhanced Fujita Scale. </li></ul><ul><li>Damage helps estimate the wind speeds of the tornado. </li></ul>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_Fujita_Scale
  5. 5. Enhanced Fujita Scale http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_Fujita_Scale Scale Wind Speed (MPH) Damage Caused EF0 65-85 Roof lightly damaged, broken tree branches EF1 86-110 Mobile homes turned over and roofs severely damaged EF2 111-135 Roofs torn off and trees uprooted EF3 136-165 Levels of homes destroyed and cars picked up ad thrown EF4 166-200 Houses completely destroyed EF5 >200 Reinforced concrete very damaged
  6. 6. Where do they occur? <ul><li>Tornadoes can be formed anywhere in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>They mostly are formed during the Spring and Summer months. </li></ul>http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/severeweather/tornadoes.html#alley
  7. 7. Tornado Alley http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate/research/tornado/stalley.gif
  8. 8. Tornado Watch <ul><li>There is a possibility that a tornado might form; listen for future weather updates. </li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/hazard/tornado/to_terms.shtm
  9. 9. Tornado Warning <ul><li>A tornado has been detected visually or on radar. Head to safety. </li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/hazard/tornado/to_terms.shtm
  10. 10. Tornado Safety Tips <ul><li>If you see a tornado or hear the tornado siren immediately head to a basement or to the lowest interior room. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are in a mobile home, vehicle, or outside seek shelter in a building or lay flat in a ditch. </li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/hazard/tornado/to_during.shtm
  11. 11. Tornado Video <ul><li>Tornado Video </li></ul>
  12. 12. Work Cited <ul><li>Slide 1- <div xmlns:cc=&quot;http://creativecommons.org/ns#&quot; about=&quot;http://www.flickr.com/photos/pingnews/452392668/&quot;><a rel=&quot;cc:attributionURL&quot; href=&quot;http://www.flickr.com/photos/pingnews/&quot;>http://www.flickr.com/photos/pingnews/</a> / <a rel=&quot;license&quot; href=&quot;http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/&quot;>CC BY-SA 2.0</a></div> </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 2- Weather.com The Weather Channel, n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.weather.com/ready/tornado/index.html>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 3- Noaa.gov NOAA, n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 4 and 5- Wikipedia.org N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced_Fujita_Scale>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 6- ncdc.noaa.gov NOAA, n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/severeweather/tornadoes.html#alley>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 7- Concannon et al. 2000. NOAA. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate/research/tornado/stalley.gif>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 8 & 9- Fema.gov FEMA, 4 June 2009. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.fema.gov/hazard/tornado/to_terms.shtm>. </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 10- Fema.gov FEMA, 4 June 2009. Web. 10 Oct. 2009 <http://www.fema.gov/hazard/tornado/to_during.shtm>. </li></ul>

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