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ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid
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ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid

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  • 1. ILC lunchtime seminar at Irish Aid Prepared by ILC Secretariat, September 24th 2012
  • 2. International Land Coalition:A global alliance•A global alliance to promote secure and equitableaccess to and control over land for women and men•Global Secretariat hosted at IFAD (Rome, Italy), withregional nodes in Manila (Asia), Kigali (Africa), Lima(Latin America)•Focus on dialogue, knowledge sharing, capacitybuilding and advocacyVision:Secure and equitable access to and control over landreduces poverty, promotes sustainable developmentand contributes to identity, dignity and inclusion
  • 3. 116 members, including intergovernmental organisations, farmers’organisations, research institutes, NGOs and CBOs – In more than 40countries
  • 4. At the root of ILC: eradicatingpovertyA bit of historyand keyunderlyingassumptions•Established as a result of the 1995 Conference on Poverty and Hunger(Brussels) as Popular Coalition to Eradicate Hunger and Poverty (PCEHP)•In 2003, the PCEHP became the International Land Coalition•Land reform leading to broadened access to secure land rights is a criticalfactor (if not a pre-requisite) for fighting hunger and eradicating poverty•The linkage between land governance (secure access to land) and foodsecurity is therefore at the root of the establishment of the ILC
  • 5. 1. Linkages betweenland tenure security and food
  • 6. Why land matters in addressinghunger and poverty?• Poverty is a predominantly rural phenomenon• It is estimated that 75% of the poor, hungry people live in rural areas (2008 WDR) Incidence of poverty in rural areas: •In Sub-Saharan Africa 51% of the rural population are poor •In South-East Asia 40% of the rural population are poor
  • 7. Why land matters in addressing hunger and poverty?Profile of the rural poor 62% 25% 13% Small farmers Landless Pastoralists, forest- dwellers, fisherfolk Securing land rights for the poor men and women helps combat poverty in rural areas and globally
  • 8. Identifying linkagesSecure and equitable access to land enhances the supply of food 1 Tenure security as promoting investment and sustainable management 2 What sort of tenure? 3 Land as collateral 4 Land distribution and productivity
  • 9. Identifying linkagesSecure and equitable access to landenhances entitlements to food 1 Tenure insecurity as food access insecurity 2 Land and entitlements to food at local level 3 Land and entitlements to food at the household level 4 Land and entitlements to food at national and global levels Food security, empowerment and people-centred land governance
  • 10. Increasingly recognised linkagesFramework and The HLTF Updated The Voluntary Guidelines onguidelines on land Comprehensive the Responsible Governance ofpolicy in Africa (2009) Framework for Action Tenure of Land, Fisheries and (2010) Forests in the Context of National Food Security (2012)
  • 11. Women’s land rightsand food security A very large body of evidence on the linkages between women’s land rights and women’s empowerment, and between women’s empowerment and both increased productivity and “other social and economic benefits” i.e. greater bargaining position within the household; improved child nutritional status, which in turns influences health and education attainment (SOFA Report 2011) “If women had the same access to productive resources as men, they could increase yields on their farms by 20-30 percent. This could raise total agricultural output in developing countries by 2.5-4 percent, which could in turn reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12-17 percent” (FAO, 2011: 5)
  • 12. Women’s land rightsand food security A very large body of research on linkages between women’s land rights and women’s empowerment, and between women’s empowerment and both improved agricultural productivity and reduced “other dimensions of human poverty” (i.e. greater bargaining position within the household; improved child nutritional status, which in turns influences health outcomes and education attainment) (FAO, 2011)2. Current challenges and priorities If women had the same access to productive resources as men, they could increase yields on their farms by 20-30 percent. This could raise total agriculturalin promoting women’s land rights output in developing countries by 2.5-4 percent, which in turn could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12-17 percent (FAO, 2011: 5)
  • 13. Why women’s land rights?1 Women’s human rights are violated2 Women’s key role in food security and natural resource management is not recognised
  • 14. Challenges and priorities in advancing women’s land rightsChallenges 1 Discriminatory/gender-blind laws or poor implementation 2 Cultural and social norms discriminate against women and delay/contain social change 3 Increasing threats to land security disproportionally affect womenPriorities 1 Understanding rights: the importance of information 2 Claiming rights: the importance of monitoring, mobilisation, and legal empowerment 3 Guaranteeing rights: the importance of enabling environments and implementation
  • 15. Understanding rights:The importance of information1 Increase women’s awareness, literacy and education2 Work with women and men in communities3 Inform men of the benefits of securing women’s rights4 Engage with customary authorities to build acceptance for WLR at community level5 Target public officials responsible for land administration, especially on inheritance6 Engage with media to raise visibility on WLR and inform
  • 16. CINEP, Colombia, Women’s empowerment to exercise tribal land rights in SARRA, India, Women’s empowerment in their communities the Cauca Valley
  • 17. Claiming rights:The importance of mobilisation1 Place women at the centre and support grassroots mobilisation2 Strengthen women’s representation in decision-making processes3 Build the capacity of women’s organisations
  • 18. Claiming rights:The importance of monitoring1 Strengthen women and organisations’ ability to monitor WLR2 Monitor gendered impacts of programmes and laws (e.g. allocation, food security….)3 Monitor gendered impacts of new threats (e.g. commercial pressures, contract farming…)
  • 19. Claiming rights:The importance of legalempowerment Provide paralegal services and legal aid, particularly for the resolution of disputes over1 inheritance, demarcation, and titling
  • 20. Claiming rights:The importance of enablingenvironments and implementation Identify and document good practices for replication and scaling-up (how to reach rural1 women; how to ensure women’s participation; how to ensure fair allocation; what works and what does not… )2 Work on national policy dialogue and advocacy3 Use/monitor CEDAW and VGGT at national level
  • 21. 3. Land rights and the rush for land
  • 22. 3. Land Voluntary Guidelines land 4. The rights and the rush for
  • 23. The Voluntary Guidelines on the ResponsibleGovernance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries andForests in the Context of National FoodSecurity 2 year-long consultation process 1 year-long negotiations Endorsed in May 2012 by the CFS Endorsed in July 2012 by the FAO Council Strong legitimacy and political momentum Provide a global benchmark for the governance of tenure Human rights framework; food security and poverty eradication; significance of small-scale food production; participation and consultation in land governance; reference to territorial development Access to justice and transparent information; women’s land rights and gender equality; ancestral domains; non-state actors responsibilities; markets; investments
  • 24. Summary of the VGGT Preface and General Matters
  • 25. Summary of the VGGT Legal recognition and allocation of tenure rights and duties
  • 26. Summary of the VGGT Transfers and other changes to tenure rights and duties
  • 27. Summary of the VGGT Administration of tenure
  • 28. Summary of the VGGT Responses to climate change and emergencies
  • 29. Summary of the VGGT Promotion, implementation, monitoring and evaluation
  • 30. Thank you!l.miggiano@landcoalition.orgIf you want to know more about ILC, please visit www.landcoalition.org

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