International Land Coalition (ILC)

Perspectives on current and
emerging land governance
challenges and ILC's responses
Br...
I. International Land Coalition
ILC - Who are we? Where are we coming from?
1995: Conference organised by IFAD on
Hunger and Poverty : The Popular Coaliti...
ILC - Who are we? Where are we coming from?

1998

1995

2003
ILC
AoM

Secret
ariat

PCHP

2005

2009

2007

AoM

AoM

AoM...
A globally diverse membership
ILC - What brings us together?
150 MEMBER ORGANISATIONS, INCLUDING:

10 IGOs (FAO, IFAD, WB, UNCCD, UNEP, WFP, IFPRI, IWMI...
THE RURAL POOR MEN AND WOMEN - A LARGE DIVERSITY
II. Land in the emerging
geopolitics of food
Understanding the current context
Food Self-sufficiency
paradigm

Food Security
paradigm

Global food production
Food pric...
2010-2020 : A turning point for land (& water)
governance?
400
global cereal production
global freshwater withdrawal
350

...
Elements of the new geopolitics
Expanding demand for
land for food:
• Rapid population
growth
• Nutrition transition
• Ene...
5, 3 M ha (17
M agr))

3, 6 M ha (4.5 M
agr)

- 32% since
1960s

The Japan Syndrome (Shimizu, 2011)

-20% since
1980s)

30...
What solutions for the future? Centrality of land
A. Avoiding the Japan Syndrome:
China:
 Loss of arable land: 8.2 millio...
III. Securing land rights for the
poor - a bigger challenge
Importance and challenge of securing land rights for the poor
Lack of investment in
agricultural modernisation

Severe lan...
Keeping track of large-scale transnational land deals
Marked spatial disconnect between:
o Regions/countries w/ highest fu...
Addressing need for gender equality in land access
The issues
• Glaring gender inequalities in land access, while context ...
Highlights on other areas of relevance

Securing rangelands

Indigenous peoples' land and
territorial rights

Virtual plat...
Land increasingly recognised as an essential element of sustainable
development, peace and stability
President Otto Perez ...
A unique multi-stakeholder and multi-perspectives platform
Thank you!
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Perspectives on current and emerging land governance challenges and ILC's responses

110 views

Published on

On 18 September, ILC was invited to give a Briefing session with IFAD Executive Board during a lunchtime session on Perspectives on current and emerging land governance challenges and ILC's responses. ILC Director Madiodio Niasse described the history and evolution of the ILC, land issues and their relationship to the geopolitics of food and the challenge of securing land rights for the poor.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
110
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Perspectives on current and emerging land governance challenges and ILC's responses

  1. 1. International Land Coalition (ILC) Perspectives on current and emerging land governance challenges and ILC's responses Briefing session with IFAD Executive Board - 18 September 2013
  2. 2. I. International Land Coalition
  3. 3. ILC - Who are we? Where are we coming from? 1995: Conference organised by IFAD on Hunger and Poverty : The Popular Coalition to Eradicate Hunger and Poverty Empowering the rural poor by increasing their access to productive resources assets (esp. land, water) Enhancing knowledge sharing about best practices for fighting humger/poverty; Building public awareness and opening space for policy reform and CSO engagement Specific emphasis: Need for "Revival of land and agrarian reform" on the national and international agenda :
  4. 4. ILC - Who are we? Where are we coming from? 1998 1995 2003 ILC AoM Secret ariat PCHP 2005 2009 2007 AoM AoM AoM S. Cruz Rome 2011 Entebbe 2013 AoM AoM Tirana Kathma ndu Antigua 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Evolution of ILC membership 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
  5. 5. A globally diverse membership
  6. 6. ILC - What brings us together? 150 MEMBER ORGANISATIONS, INCLUDING: 10 IGOs (FAO, IFAD, WB, UNCCD, UNEP, WFP, IFPRI, IWMI, ILRI, ICRAF) 100 Southern-based FOs (AFA, FUNDAPAZ, EAFF) and CSOs (ANGOC, CEPES, LN-WA) 40 global and Northern-based CSOs (Oxfam, SNV, WRI, LANDESA, CIRAD, IIED) In addition: 5 Strategic Partners (MFA-Netherlands, SDC-Switzerland, EC, SidaSweden, AU-LPI) WHO? A global alliance of civil society and intergovernment al organisations WHAT PURPOSE? Promote secure & equitable access to and control over land for poor women and men HOW DO WE WORK?: • advocacy • dialogue • knowledge sharing • capacity building and empowerment. Goal of ILC 2011-2015 : To enable poor rural women & men to gain secure and equitable access to and control over land in order to increase their food security and overcome poverty & vulnerability
  7. 7. THE RURAL POOR MEN AND WOMEN - A LARGE DIVERSITY
  8. 8. II. Land in the emerging geopolitics of food
  9. 9. Understanding the current context Food Self-sufficiency paradigm Food Security paradigm Global food production Food price index ?
  10. 10. 2010-2020 : A turning point for land (& water) governance? 400 global cereal production global freshwater withdrawal 350 global extension of irrigated land baseline = 1960 = 100 Relative growth global extension of cultivated land 300 250 200 150 100 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 sources: UNESA 2013, FAOSTAT 2013, FAO 2011, HLPE 2012, MEA 2005, Rockstrom et al 2009 2040 2050
  11. 11. Elements of the new geopolitics Expanding demand for land for food: • Rapid population growth • Nutrition transition • Energy and climate mitigation demand for land/water Constraints to expanding food supplies: • Climate change and variability • Reduced yield gaps • Closing land and water frontiers in traditionally high performing grain producing regions, etc. • Japan Syndrome Structural dimensions of current/emerging food security problems: • Land and water -- reaching the resource limits (planetary boundaries) • Japan syndrome: A densely populated fast-growing and industrialising countries, experiences the shrinking of its grainland, translating into increased dependency on imports (Bown, 2004). • Syndrome was experienced by Japan, South Korean, Taiwan
  12. 12. 5, 3 M ha (17 M agr)) 3, 6 M ha (4.5 M agr) - 32% since 1960s The Japan Syndrome (Shimizu, 2011) -20% since 1980s) 3000 Area x 1000 hecatres 2000 Arable land x1000 hectares -50% since 1970s) 2500 1500 1000 500 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2004 Trends in arable land in South Korea (Honma & Hayami. 2007) 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2004 Trends in arable land in Taiwan (Honma & Hayami. 2007) China and India : Threats of the Japan syndrome and implications for global food security
  13. 13. What solutions for the future? Centrality of land A. Avoiding the Japan Syndrome: China:  Loss of arable land: 8.2 million of arable land between 1997 and 2010 (Hofman & Ho, 2012)  Loss of food self-sufficiency: Net food importer from 2004  bottom-line of 120 million hectares of arable land that need to be safeguarded India:  Industralisation (SEZs), infrastructure, urbanisation => Risk to food-self-sufficiency  Sanctuarisation" of the grainland: Possibility to "classify" the remaining arable land to prevent its conversion to other uses B. Increasing productivity of existing arable land (1.5 billion ha)  Closing the yield gap  Breaking the yield frontier C. Expanding the arable land:  Approach based on perception that there is a substantial amount of unused and underused land that is suitable for agriculture (Deininger, 2011) o Estimate: 445 million ha (equivalent of 30% of existing arable land) o Mainly (3/4th) in LA (28% : 123,000,000 ha) and in Africa (45%: 200 million ha): ==> Africa's savannah region: "Sleeping Giant" of 400 million ha of "unused/underused" land (WB, 2009)
  14. 14. III. Securing land rights for the poor - a bigger challenge
  15. 15. Importance and challenge of securing land rights for the poor Lack of investment in agricultural modernisation Severe land degradation Poverty - hunger Lack of investment in water control infrastructure A generation gap: loss of farmer pride; youth outmigration How representative of Africa's 33 million smallholder farms (that produce 90% of food consumed in the continent)?
  16. 16. Keeping track of large-scale transnational land deals Marked spatial disconnect between: o Regions/countries w/ highest future food demand is anticipated: South/SE Asia: China, India o Regions/Countries with the financial capital / tech know-how to develop land/water:Global North, emerging economies, oil-rich countries o Regions w/ highest land & water potential food production : Africa & L-America Key features • Escalation following food and energy price crises of 2008/9 • Drivers: Both food, energy security and profit • No single predominant investor type: Top ten countries of origin include both emerging and developed economies • A large proportion small-scale landgrabbing within countries, but often unnoticed. • Lack of transparency ILC response: Key assumption: Greater transparency allows wider involvement of stakeholders in decision-making, and enables better decision-making on trade-offs • Facilitating greater citizen involvement in promoting transparency in land and investment • National multi-stakeholder pilots, bringing together government with civil society • Global Observatory of the Land Matrix a tool that allows wide participation in decisionmaking, based on publicly available information • www.landmatrix.org
  17. 17. Addressing need for gender equality in land access The issues • Glaring gender inequalities in land access, while context of increased feminisation of agriculture • Rationale for correcting gender inequality is primarily a rights issue: women and men need to be treated equally in resource access • Economic/efficiency rationale: It helps improve agricultural productivity: If given the same level of access and tenure to land than men women would increase yields on their farms by 20-30%, with spill over effects on poverty reduction efforts ILC response: • Awareness raising, information generation and sharing • Monitoring the status of women's land rights and fulfilment of claims (e.g. CEDAW shadow reporting) • Contributing to enabling environments: o at national level : selected focus countries o in regional and international forums (e.g. CSW) and land-related policy processes (VGGT operationalisation)
  18. 18. Highlights on other areas of relevance Securing rangelands Indigenous peoples' land and territorial rights Virtual platform for knowledge/experience sharing Land rights defenders
  19. 19. Land increasingly recognised as an essential element of sustainable development, peace and stability President Otto Perez Molina at ILC AoM - 2013 Antigua • Prime Minister Sali Berisha at ILC AoM - 2011 Tirana Voting on Food Sovereignty at the Assembly of Members Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal at ILC AoM 2009 Kathmandu
  20. 20. A unique multi-stakeholder and multi-perspectives platform
  21. 21. Thank you!

×