Educ 522 Week 2 Obseravable Actions

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Educ 522 Week 2 Obseravable Actions

  1. 1. MI Domain Wheel 1 Introspective Domain Visual, Intrapersonal, Existential
  2. 2. Wheel of MI Domains Visualize the fluid relationship among the different intelligences.
  3. 3. Visual - Uniquely emotional componet to visualizing a piece of art before creating it. Existential - It is necessary to Introspective make that a leap of faith in order to contribute to the Domain collective human experience. Intrapersonal - everything is reinforced and mastered by the “Affective” emotional connection the learner has with the material they are learning.
  4. 4. Visual
  5. 5. Visual Allows students to picture ideas and solutions to problems in their minds before trying to verbalize them or put them into practice.
  6. 6. Visual Allows students to picture ideas and solutions to problems in their minds before trying to verbalize them or put them into practice.
  7. 7. Visual Allows students to picture ideas and solutions to problems in their minds before trying to verbalize them or put them into practice. Include
  8. 8. Visual Allows students to picture ideas and solutions to problems in their minds before trying to verbalize them or put them into practice. Include Charts, graphs, maps, tables, illustrations, art, puzzles, costumes
  9. 9. Visual Observable Actions observe, symbolize, draw, sketch, draft, illustrate, paint, color, contour, outline, rearrange, design, redesign, invent, create, conceive, originate, innovate, imagine, picture, envision, visiualize, pretend.
  10. 10. Visual
  11. 11. Visual Non-Digital Technologies Picture books, art supplies, white boards, overhead projectors, TVs, DVDs, cameras, video cameras
  12. 12. Visual Non-Digital Technologies Picture books, art supplies, white boards, overhead projectors, TVs, DVDs, cameras, video cameras
  13. 13. Visual Non-Digital Technologies Picture books, art supplies, white boards, overhead projectors, TVs, DVDs, cameras, video cameras Digital Technologies Monitors, digital cameras, camcorders, scanners.
  14. 14. Intrapersonal
  15. 15. Intrapersonal It is the part of us that expects learning to be meaningful. The more we find pertinence in what we study, the more inclined we are to take ownership for our learning and the better we will retain what we have learned.
  16. 16. Intrapersonal It is the part of us that expects learning to be meaningful. The more we find pertinence in what we study, the more inclined we are to take ownership for our learning and the better we will retain what we have learned.
  17. 17. Intrapersonal It is the part of us that expects learning to be meaningful. The more we find pertinence in what we study, the more inclined we are to take ownership for our learning and the better we will retain what we have learned. Include:
  18. 18. Intrapersonal It is the part of us that expects learning to be meaningful. The more we find pertinence in what we study, the more inclined we are to take ownership for our learning and the better we will retain what we have learned. Include: feelings, values, attitudes - “Why do I need to learn this?” Learning must be meaningful.
  19. 19. Intrapersonal Observable Actions Express, imply, support, sponsor, promote, advise, advocate, encourage, champion, justify, rationalize, characterize, defend, validate, vindicate, assess, evaluate, judge, challenge, survey, poll.
  20. 20. Intrapersonal
  21. 21. Intrapersonal Non-digital Technologies Journals, diaries, surveys, voting machines, learning centers, children’s literature.
  22. 22. Intrapersonal Non-digital Technologies Journals, diaries, surveys, voting machines, learning centers, children’s literature.
  23. 23. Intrapersonal Non-digital Technologies Journals, diaries, surveys, voting machines, learning centers, children’s literature. Digital Technologies Online forms, real-time projects, webquest
  24. 24. Existential
  25. 25. Existential The intelligence of understanding processes within a larger, existential context. Students have the ability to summarize and synthesize ideas from many disciplines and sources.
  26. 26. Existential The intelligence of understanding processes within a larger, existential context. Students have the ability to summarize and synthesize ideas from many disciplines and sources.
  27. 27. Existential The intelligence of understanding processes within a larger, existential context. Students have the ability to summarize and synthesize ideas from many disciplines and sources. Include:
  28. 28. Existential The intelligence of understanding processes within a larger, existential context. Students have the ability to summarize and synthesize ideas from many disciplines and sources. Include: aesthetics, philosophy, religion, see place in big picture - classroom, world, universe
  29. 29. Existential Observable Actions Reflect, contemplate, deliberate, ponder, summarize, synthesize, associate, relate, recap, enxapsulate, elaborate, appreciate, eppraise, critique, evaluate, assess, speculate, explore, dream, wonder.
  30. 30. Existential
  31. 31. Existential Non-Digital Technologies Art replicas, planetariums, stage dramas, classic literature, classic philosophy, simulation games.
  32. 32. Existential Non-Digital Technologies Art replicas, planetariums, stage dramas, classic literature, classic philosophy, simulation games.
  33. 33. Existential Non-Digital Technologies Art replicas, planetariums, stage dramas, classic literature, classic philosophy, simulation games. Digital Technologies Virtual reality, virtual communities, blogs, wikis, simulations.
  34. 34. Dinner Break 30 minutes
  35. 35. Bloom’s Taxonomy EDUC 522 Learning in the 21st Century: Multiple Intelligence and Instructional Technology
  36. 36. The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. -Plutarch
  37. 37. What is Higher Order Thinking? A guide to Productive Pedagogies: Classroom reflection manual states that: Higher-order thinking by students involves the transformation of information and ideas. This transformation occurs when students combine facts and ideas and synthesize, generalize, explain, hypothesize or arrive at some conclusion or interpretation. Manipulating information and ideas through these processes allows students to solve problems, gain understanding and discover new meaning. When students engage in the construction of knowledge, an element of uncertainty is introduced into the instructional process and the outcomes are not always predictable; in other words, the teacher is not certain what the students will produce. In helping students become producers of knowledge, the teacher’s main instructional task is to create activities or environments that allow them opportunities to engage in higher-order thinking. (Department of Education, Queensland, 2002, p. 1)
  38. 38. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited
  39. 39. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives
  40. 40. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom
  41. 41. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking
  42. 42. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool
  43. 43. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models
  44. 44. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models • Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the higher order levels of thinking
  45. 45. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models • Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the higher order levels of thinking • 1990s - Lorin Anderson (former student of Bloom) revisited the taxonomy
  46. 46. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models • Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the higher order levels of thinking • 1990s - Lorin Anderson (former student of Bloom) revisited the taxonomy • As a result, a number of changes were made
  47. 47. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revisited • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • 1950s - developed by Benjamin Bloom • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models • Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the higher order levels of thinking • 1990s - Lorin Anderson (former student of Bloom) revisited the taxonomy • As a result, a number of changes were made (Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, pp. 7-8)
  48. 48. Original Terms New Terms (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  49. 49. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  50. 50. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  51. 51. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  52. 52. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  53. 53. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating Analysis Analyzing (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  54. 54. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating Analysis Analyzing Application Applying (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  55. 55. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating Analysis Analyzing Application Applying Comprehension Understanding (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  56. 56. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating Analysis Analyzing Application Applying Comprehension Understanding Knowledge (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  57. 57. Original Terms New Terms Evaluation Creating Synthesis Evaluating Analysis Analyzing Application Applying Comprehension Understanding Knowledge Remembering (Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8)
  58. 58. Change in Terms • The names of six major categories were changed from noun to verb forms. • As the taxonomy reflects different forms of thinking and thinking is an active process verbs were more accurate. • The subcategories of the six major categories were also replaced by verbs • Some subcategories were reorganized. • The knowledge category was renamed. Knowledge is a product of thinking and was inappropriate to describe a category of thinking and was replaced with the word remembering instead. • Comprehension became understanding and synthesis was renamed creating in order to better reflect the nature of the thinking described by each category. (http://rite.ed.qut.edu.au/oz-teachernet/training/bloom.html (accessed July 2003) ; Pohl, 2000, p. 8)
  59. 59. BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMY Higher-order thinking Creating Generating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing things Designing, constructing, planning, producing, inventing. Evaluating Justifying a decision or course of action Checking, hypothesizing, critiquing, experimenting, judging Analyzing Breaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationships Comparing, organizing, deconstructing, interrogating, finding Applying Using information in another familiar situation Implementing, carrying out, using, executing Understanding Explaining ideas or concepts Interpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing, classifying, explaining Remembering Recalling information Recognizing, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding
  60. 60. Remembering The learner is able to recall, restate and remember learned information. Recognizing Listing Describing Identifying Retrieving Naming Locating Finding Can you recall information?
  61. 61. Remembering Activities List Listen Memorize Group Relate Choose Show Recite Locate Distinguish Review Give example Quote Reproduce Record Quote Match Repeat Select Label Underline Recall Know Cite Group Sort Read Write Outline
  62. 62. Products Include Quiz Label Definition List Fact Workbook Worksheet Reproduction Test Vocabulary
  63. 63. Classroom Roles Student roles Teacher roles Responds Absorbs Directs Remembers Tells Recognizes Shows Memorizes Examines Defines Questions Describes Evaluates Retells Passive recipient
  64. 64. Potential Activities and Products 1. Make a story map showing the main events of the story. 2. Make a time line of your typical day. 3. Make a concept map of the topic. 4. Write a list of keywords you know about…. 5. What characters were in the story? 6. Make a chart showing… 7. Make an acrostic poem about… 8. Recite a poem you have learnt.

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