Check It Before You Wreck It<br />Using your assignment sheet to guide you to a successful finish<br />
Tales from the Writing Center<br />The assignment: Compare “Learning to Read and Write” with “Graduation in Stamps.”<br />...
Drawing a blank<br />We discussed the assignment briefly and I gave the student some pointers.<br />The student sat there ...
Well begun is half done<br />After the student had been working for about an hour, I checked on his progress.  At this poi...
Driving cross country without a map<br />Main idea of paragraph one: education<br />Main idea of paragraph two: dominant c...
It only works if you work it<br />    The Writing Process<br />Collecting: gathering your ideas and taking notes.<br />Sha...
Avoiding informationoverload<br />Teachers can pack a lot of information onto an assignment sheet.<br />To begin with, loo...
Before…<br />Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br />Organizethis...
…After<br />Explore<br />Organize<br />Introduce<br />State<br />Provide<br />Argue<br />Remind<br />Suggest<br />Revise<b...
Before…<br />Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br />Organizethis...
…After<br />  Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br />  Organiz...
Check it wreck it
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Check it wreck it

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Successfully Using Assignment Sheets

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Check it wreck it

  1. 1. Check It Before You Wreck It<br />Using your assignment sheet to guide you to a successful finish<br />
  2. 2. Tales from the Writing Center<br />The assignment: Compare “Learning to Read and Write” with “Graduation in Stamps.”<br />Look at how a dominant culture affects a minority.<br />Look at how patterns of imagery establish theme.<br />Look at how a person’s life choices affect one’s destiny.<br />Analyze authors’ theme.<br />
  3. 3. Drawing a blank<br />We discussed the assignment briefly and I gave the student some pointers.<br />The student sat there staring at a blank white screen.<br />He hadn’t taken any notes in preparation for writing a draft.<br />He hadn’t annotated his assignment sheet to pick out the highlights.<br />He hadn’t annotated the two essays in his textbook<br />
  4. 4. Well begun is half done<br />After the student had been working for about an hour, I checked on his progress. At this point, he had a typed rough draft just over one page in length. Two pages was the length requirement. The student was very tired and frustrated. I checked his draft, hoping to be the bearer of good news. Unfortunately, this is what I saw:<br />
  5. 5. Driving cross country without a map<br />Main idea of paragraph one: education<br />Main idea of paragraph two: dominant culture<br />Main idea of paragraph three: education<br />Main idea of paragraph four: education<br /> As you can see, he had only answered one question completely and another in part. His draft was both incomplete and repetitive.<br />
  6. 6. It only works if you work it<br /> The Writing Process<br />Collecting: gathering your ideas and taking notes.<br />Shaping: figuring out which ideas you want to tackle and in what order.<br />Drafting: going from handwritten notes to a rough draft to a smooth draft.<br />Revising: adding development, flow, and polish.<br />
  7. 7. Avoiding informationoverload<br />Teachers can pack a lot of information onto an assignment sheet.<br />To begin with, look for verbs. Verbs tell you what to do. Use a highlighter to mark the verbs. Also highlight key words. This is an easy shortcut.<br />If the assignment sheet uses numbered questions or bullet points, check these off as you write your draft. <br />
  8. 8. Before…<br />Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br />Organizethis list into logical groups. <br />Introducethe works under analysis and the authors.<br />Stateyour thesis, that is, the main point you are trying to make by choosing to write about these two works.<br />Provide background material on the relevance or appeal of the works.<br />Argue the similarities or differences by analyzing appropriate passages.<br />Remind the reader of the writer’s theme and the important literary elements.<br />Suggestthe wider significance of your analysis.<br />Revise your analysis, insertingtransitional words and phrases.<br />Checkfor style and grammar<br />Avoida series of short, choppy sentences.<br />Combinesentences for a smooth, logical flow of ideas.<br />
  9. 9. …After<br />Explore<br />Organize<br />Introduce<br />State<br />Provide<br />Argue<br />Remind<br />Suggest<br />Revise<br />Check<br />Avoid<br />Combine<br />
  10. 10. Before…<br />Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br />Organizethis list into logical groups. <br />Introducethe works under analysis and the authors.<br />Stateyour thesis, that is, the main point you are trying to make by choosing to write about these two works.<br />Provide background material on the relevance or appeal of the works.<br />Argue the similarities or differences by analyzing appropriate passages.<br />Remind the reader of the writer’s theme and the important literary elements.<br />Suggestthe wider significance of your analysis.<br />Revise your analysis, insertingtransitional words and phrases.<br />Checkfor style and grammar<br />Avoida series of short, choppy sentences.<br />Combinesentences for a smooth, logical flow of ideas.<br />
  11. 11. …After<br /> Explore similarities and differences by listing the elements that the works have in common.<br /> Organizethis list into logical groups. <br /> Introducethe works under analysis and the authors.<br /> Stateyour thesis, that is, the main point you are trying to make by choosing to write about these two works.<br /> Provide background material on the relevance or appeal of the works.<br /> Argue the similarities or differences by analyzing appropriate passages.<br /> Remind the reader of the writer’s theme and the important literary elements.<br /> Suggestthe wider significance of your analysis.<br /> Revise your analysis, insertingtransitional words and phrases.<br /> Checkfor style and grammar<br /> Avoida series of short, choppy sentences.<br /> Combinesentences for a smooth, logical flow of ideas.<br />

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