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Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche
 

Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche

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Appalachian Trail SGP

Appalachian Trail SGP

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  • Title Slide <br />
  • Title Slide <br />
  • Title Slide <br />
  • Title Slide <br />
  • Thesis <br />
  • <br />
  • photo: purebound.com <br />
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries. <br /> People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> (purebound.com) <br /> <br /> photo:purebound.com <br />
  • Backpacking is an rigorous form of hiking. Though backpackers are hiking they carry all the equipment they will need with them. Usually backpacking is an extended hike that lasts for at least a day. These backpacks carry the hikers essential equipment like food and water. Backpacking is harder than just the simple hike. These packs can weight 30-70lbs and the additional weight on the hikers legs and back can cause more injuries. <br /> People enjoy hiking for many different reasons. For some it separates them from the rest of the world and really lets them take a look at what else is around them and how beautiful nature can be. Unlike many other physical activities hiking allows people to move at a comfortable pace while still getting exercise. Some of the more extensive hikes like the AT are a form of a challenge (man vs wild); it is both a survival challenge and an endurance challenge of how many miles are hiked and the types terrain encountered. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> (purebound.com) <br /> <br /> photo:purebound.com <br />
  • Intro slide to backpacking and hiking <br /> What is backpacking? <br /> How is it different from hiking? <br /> Why it&#x2019;s done <br /> Its challenges <br /> <br /> photo: purebound.com <br />
  • The Appalachian Trail is the nation&apos;s longest marked footpath, at approximately 2,178 miles. The path travels from Mt. Katahdin, Maine to Springer Mountain, Georgia; touching 14 states total. Dubbed a privately managed national park the AT crosses six other&#xA0;national park system and eight national forests. The AT is maintained by 30 trail clubs and multiple partnerships; more than 6,000 volunteers contribute about 200,000 hours to the Appalachian Trail every year. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> It takes approximately 5 million footsteps to walk the entire length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> <br /> photo: Appalachian Trail Conservancy <br /> <br />
  • The Appalachian Trail is the nation&apos;s longest marked footpath, at approximately 2,178 miles. The path travels from Mt. Katahdin, Maine to Springer Mountain, Georgia; touching 14 states total. Dubbed a privately managed national park the AT crosses six other&#xA0;national park system and eight national forests. The AT is maintained by 30 trail clubs and multiple partnerships; more than 6,000 volunteers contribute about 200,000 hours to the Appalachian Trail every year. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> <br />
  • The general half-way point is at Harpers Ferry, WV. Here the Appalachian Trail Conservancy &#x201C;preserves and manages of the natural, scenic, historic, and cultural resources associated with the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in order to provide primitive outdoor-recreation and educational opportunities for Trail visitors.&#x201D; (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Since the 1990s the AT has expanded north into Canada. Quebec and New Brunswick. &#x201C;Nova Scotia signed on in 2007, and is currently in the planning stages, as is Prince Edward Island, which signed on in 2008. Paul Wylezol, chairperson if the IAT chapter in Newfoundland and Labrador (IATNL), says there are plans to expand the trail network into Europe as well. IAT officials are heading to Spain, Portugal, and Scotland this spring to begin the process of establishing chapters in those countries. And there are hopes of getting Norway, Ireland, France, and Morocco involved as well.&#x201D; (Dunlap, Rachael. "Appalachian Trail Heads North." Intelligent Travel. National Geographic, 16 Mar. 2009. Web. 5 May 2010. .) <br />
  • The Appalachian Trail was founded by Benton MacKaye; he was &#x201C;convinced that the pace of urban and industrial life along the East Coast was harmful to people.&#x201D; (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). So he envisioned the A.T. as a path interspersed with planned wilderness communities where people could go to renew themselves. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). That idea never gained much traction, but the notion of a thousand-mile footpath in the mountains fired the imaginations of hikers and outdoorsmen from Maine to Georgia. Inspired by him, they began building trails and trying to connect them. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> The trail was completed in 1937. It fell into disrepair during World War II, when Trail maintainers were unable to work on it, and parts of the route were lost. After the war, a concerted effort was made to restore it, and it was once again declared complete in 1951. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> Arthur Perkins (an ex-judge) and Myron Avery (lawyer). (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> Both rekindled the idea of the Trail in 1928 and 1929 by using MacKaye&apos;s ideas to recruit volunteers, establishing hiking clubs up and down the coast, and actually going out to hike, clear brush, and mark paths themselves. When Perkins&apos; health failed in the early 1930s, Avery took over, establishing a network of volunteers, developing clubs, working with the government, building the organization of the ATC, and setting the Trail&apos;s northern terminus at Katahdin in his native Maine. Avery remained chairman of ATC until 1952. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> At first, the goal was to blaze a connected route so that the Trail led along old forest roads and other trails. Trail maintainers mostly just cleared brush and painted blazes. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy). &#x201C;Today&apos;s Trail has mostly been moved off the old roads and onto new paths dug and reinforced especially for hikers. Today&apos;s route, though engineered much more elaborately, often requires more climbing, because it leads up the sides of many mountains that the old woods roads bypassed.&#x201D; (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> (MacKaye, Benton. "An American Trail: A Project in Regional Planning." Journal of &#xA0;the American Institute of Architects 9 (Oct. 1921): 325-330. PDF file.) <br /> <br /> photo: www.mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker <br /> <br />
  • Since the completion of the trail people have embraced MacKaye&#x2019;s philosophy and hiked the AT to get away from the hectic of the urban world. (Henry, Brice, et al. "The Spirit of the Appalachian Trail." Interview by David&#xA0;Byers and Kate Russell. The Sprit of the Appalachian Trail. 2009. Google Videos. Web. 13 Apr. 2010. ). <br /> &#x201C;More than 10,000 people have reported hiking the length of the Trail.&#x201D;(Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> Through-Hiking: n. hike of the Trail&#x2019;s entire length in one season <br /> Section Hiking: v. The approach to walking the length of the Trail in segments <br /> <br /> &#x201C;Because the A.T. spans a great variety of terrain, ranging from relatively flat and easy, to extremely arduous, the following scale was created as a general guide: <br /> 1=Flat <br /> 5=Strenuous ups and downs, only occasional flat sections <br /> 10=Use of hands required, footing precarious &#x2014; not recommended for those with fear of heights and not in good physical condition.&#x201D; <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> &#x201C;Maine: 3-10, New Hampshire: 6-10&#x201D; <br /> (Graeber, Charles. "One Day at a Time on the Five-Million-Step Program."National Geographic Adventure Magazine June-July 2004: n. pag. National Geographic: One-Stop Research. Web. 30 Nov. 2009. ) <br /> <br /> <br /> picture: www.mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Preparation for backpacking, hiking the AT <br /> physically <br /> health <br /> what to pack <br /> how to pack <br /> special for through-hikers <br />
  • It&#x2019;s important to practice hiking and backpacking before you start your endeavor on the AT. Some good places to practice are local parks and around the neighborhood. This &#x201C;warmup&#x201D; is a perfect opportunity to break in your boots and become accustomed to your pack. The terrain on the AT is much more demanding than your local foot path so it&#x2019;d important to build leg muscle before going on the trail. This will also prevent injuries; like sprains, or pulled muscles. The most common injuries that occur on the AT evolve the knee, hamstrings, and back; so if you have preexisting problems with these areas it&#x2019;s important to take care of them by stretching or seeing your doctor for a brace of some sort. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • The muscles used when backpacking: the abdominals, lumbar muscles, dorsal muscles, gluteals, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. This diagram shows where they are in the body, to give a better understanding that it&#x2019;s just not walking; you&#x2019;re using all sorts of muscles. <br /> It is important to stretch these muscles before starting your hike everyday; you may have to stretch them multiple times a day, depending on how far and intense your hike is. The most frequently pulled muscles are your hamstrings and even your groin area. Making sure you stretch your hamstrings is also important because having tight hamstrings can effect your knees. <br /> (Berger, Karen. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide.) <br /> <br /> photo: blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/muscle.2.jpg <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • What you bring depends on how long your going to be out on the trail and what season you&#x2019;ll be hiking in. But what should you bring in general? <br /> dehydrated or food that doesn&apos;t need to be refrigerated, <br /> a lightweight sleeping bag (this can take up a lot of room, stores like REI and EMS sell special light weight bags that barely take up any space), <br /> a tent (depending on how many people there are you can split up the load, make sure it has a rain fly), <br /> a mess-kit (to cook your food in) <br /> a few clothing items (this should be limited to a few shirts and a few shorts) <br /> a first aid kit <br /> toothbrush and toothpaste (small, paste can be shared) <br /> a rain coat <br /> 2 water bottles and a bladder (hydration is one of the most important things when hiking) <br /> sandals (after a day of hiking miles and miles your feet need a break, however they should still be protective) <br /> extra hiking socks (will be worth it, it&#x2019;s important to keep you feet dry, there&#x2019;s only one thing worse than cold, wet, soar feet... wet toilet paper) <br /> toilet paper IN A WATERPROOF BAG (there&#x2019;s nothing as useless as wet toilet paper) <br /> however there&#x2019;s nothing more useful than duct tape(take it off the roll to save space) <br /> a cell phone (for emergencies so you wont use it often) <br /> a small wash cloth (to wipe down with and it comes in handy as a hot pad or &#x201C;oven mitt&#x201D;) <br /> a bandana and hat (keeps you cool and keeps the sun out of your eyes) <br /> sun screen (the most common injury on the AT is sunburn, it sucks and can get nasty) <br /> bug-spray (for those Westnile infested states like West Virginia) <br /> cards (you get bored, truly is a sanity item) <br /> deodorant (many hikers smell bad because of the lack of showers, deodorant makes the smell a little more bearable) <br /> a comb or brush (after a while hikers just seem to stop brushing their hair so a small brush or comb would be better) <br /> a small stove (it&#x2019;s easier to cook food on a stove and the heat can be more controlled than on a fire, also comes in handy when there&#x2019;s rain) <br /> matches (mans tool to create fire, and light a stove) <br /> a water purifier (back in the day the water may have been safe to drink but today there are all sorts of bacteria in that water than can make you spend you day in the privy or worse) <br /> and finally ONE LUXERY ITEM (this is the item that a hiker can bring for their enjoyment, like a book, teddy bear, ball, extra clothes, or an umbrella) <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • In times of emergency, and even just for convenience its important to keep frequently used things in an easy-yo-reach part of your bag; this way you wont be unpacking your bag every time you need something. Keeping the weight centered on the body is very important; because the pack is so large it&#x2019;s easy to become off balance. It also prevents injuring your back. Compressing your things gives you enough space to pack all the things you&#x2019;ll need. Sleeping bags are probably the hardest thing to compress and take up the most room. Keeping the pack streamline is important because there are branches that your pack could get caught on, also it helps keep your balance because you want things to be centered near your spine. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • In times of emergency, and even just for convenience its important to keep frequently used things in an easy-yo-reach part of your bag; this way you wont be unpacking your bag every time you need something. Keeping the weight centered on the body is very important; because the pack is so large it&#x2019;s easy to become off balance. It also prevents injuring your back. Compressing your things gives you enough space to pack all the things you&#x2019;ll need. Sleeping bags are probably the hardest thing to compress and take up the most room. Keeping the pack streamline is important because there are branches that your pack could get caught on, also it helps keep your balance because you want things to be centered near your spine. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • In times of emergency, and even just for convenience its important to keep frequently used things in an easy-yo-reach part of your bag; this way you wont be unpacking your bag every time you need something. Keeping the weight centered on the body is very important; because the pack is so large it&#x2019;s easy to become off balance. It also prevents injuring your back. Compressing your things gives you enough space to pack all the things you&#x2019;ll need. Sleeping bags are probably the hardest thing to compress and take up the most room. Keeping the pack streamline is important because there are branches that your pack could get caught on, also it helps keep your balance because you want things to be centered near your spine. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • In times of emergency, and even just for convenience its important to keep frequently used things in an easy-yo-reach part of your bag; this way you wont be unpacking your bag every time you need something. Keeping the weight centered on the body is very important; because the pack is so large it&#x2019;s easy to become off balance. It also prevents injuring your back. Compressing your things gives you enough space to pack all the things you&#x2019;ll need. Sleeping bags are probably the hardest thing to compress and take up the most room. Keeping the pack streamline is important because there are branches that your pack could get caught on, also it helps keep your balance because you want things to be centered near your spine. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • An example of centering the weight, and keeping the pack streamline. The man on the top shows the effects of the weight being too high in the pack and it throws you off balance. The man on the bottom shows the effects of weight being too low; this makes the pack feel heavier and makes you feel like your going to fall backwards if your standing up straight. <br /> For things, especially large things like a sleeping pad of parts if a tent, its better to have them stream line with the pack. It&#x2019;s easier to keep your balance and you wont get caught in branches and whatnot. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • showing in comic instead of with bag one of the best technique for compressing the backpack. <br /> First you make sure your bag is completely open and all the compression straps are loose. <br /> Then you pack your things in the pack. <br /> Then shake the bag and bounce it on the ground to use gravity to get things settled better. <br /> Then you compress the air out by pushing down and on the sides, and by tightening the compression straps. <br /> <br /> *make sure you don&#x2019;t have things that break easily in the pack while you&#x2019;re doing this. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • Exam gloves- to protect yourself from coming in contact with someone&#x2019;s body fluids when examining them. <br /> CPR face shield- protects yourself from airborne diseases when giving CPR to someone else <br /> Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads- for injuries, ect. <br /> Splints and a Triangle Bandage- for if someone is suspected to have broken their arm or has a sprain <br /> Moleskin/ Blister kit- for blisters <br /> Alcohol swabs and Antiseptic ointment- to disinfect open wounds like cuts and abrasions <br /> Scissors <br /> Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit- tick removal kit comes with tweezers and a bag to put the tick in in case you have to get it checked for lime disease, tweezers can also be used to remove splinters, etc. <br /> Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc)- to relieve pain, like for headaches <br /> These are all safety things that are not only for helping others, but for protecting yourself. <br /> <br /> *remember make sure the scene is safe before helping them, putting yourself at risk too will only mean having to help two people instead of one. Also if you don&#x2019;t know what to do or if the injury is serious call 911. <br /> <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • Exam gloves- to protect yourself from coming in contact with someone&#x2019;s body fluids when examining them. <br /> CPR face shield- protects yourself from airborne diseases when giving CPR to someone else <br /> Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads- for injuries, ect. <br /> Splints and a Triangle Bandage- for if someone is suspected to have broken their arm or has a sprain <br /> Moleskin/ Blister kit- for blisters <br /> Alcohol swabs and Antiseptic ointment- to disinfect open wounds like cuts and abrasions <br /> Scissors <br /> Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit- tick removal kit comes with tweezers and a bag to put the tick in in case you have to get it checked for lime disease, tweezers can also be used to remove splinters, etc. <br /> Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc)- to relieve pain, like for headaches <br /> These are all safety things that are not only for helping others, but for protecting yourself. <br /> <br /> *remember make sure the scene is safe before helping them, putting yourself at risk too will only mean having to help two people instead of one. Also if you don&#x2019;t know what to do or if the injury is serious call 911. <br /> <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • Exam gloves- to protect yourself from coming in contact with someone&#x2019;s body fluids when examining them. <br /> CPR face shield- protects yourself from airborne diseases when giving CPR to someone else <br /> Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads- for injuries, ect. <br /> Splints and a Triangle Bandage- for if someone is suspected to have broken their arm or has a sprain <br /> Moleskin/ Blister kit- for blisters <br /> Alcohol swabs and Antiseptic ointment- to disinfect open wounds like cuts and abrasions <br /> Scissors <br /> Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit- tick removal kit comes with tweezers and a bag to put the tick in in case you have to get it checked for lime disease, tweezers can also be used to remove splinters, etc. <br /> Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc)- to relieve pain, like for headaches <br /> These are all safety things that are not only for helping others, but for protecting yourself. <br /> <br /> *remember make sure the scene is safe before helping them, putting yourself at risk too will only mean having to help two people instead of one. Also if you don&#x2019;t know what to do or if the injury is serious call 911. <br /> <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • Exam gloves- to protect yourself from coming in contact with someone&#x2019;s body fluids when examining them. <br /> CPR face shield- protects yourself from airborne diseases when giving CPR to someone else <br /> Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads- for injuries, ect. <br /> Splints and a Triangle Bandage- for if someone is suspected to have broken their arm or has a sprain <br /> Moleskin/ Blister kit- for blisters <br /> Alcohol swabs and Antiseptic ointment- to disinfect open wounds like cuts and abrasions <br /> Scissors <br /> Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit- tick removal kit comes with tweezers and a bag to put the tick in in case you have to get it checked for lime disease, tweezers can also be used to remove splinters, etc. <br /> Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc)- to relieve pain, like for headaches <br /> These are all safety things that are not only for helping others, but for protecting yourself. <br /> <br /> *remember make sure the scene is safe before helping them, putting yourself at risk too will only mean having to help two people instead of one. Also if you don&#x2019;t know what to do or if the injury is serious call 911. <br /> <br /> (Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions.) <br />
  • responsibilities and courtesies of the trail <br /> terrain <br /> wildlife <br /> cautions <br /> shelters and towns <br /> signs <br /> water sources <br /> trail magic- what is it, why it&#x2019;s awesome <br />
  • responsibilities and courtesies of the trail <br /> terrain <br /> wildlife <br /> cautions <br /> shelters and towns <br /> signs <br /> water sources <br /> trail magic- what is it, why it&#x2019;s awesome <br />
  • through hikers are hikers that are hiking the entire trail <br /> sectional hikers hiker parts of the trail, like a week or month long hike. They can people who are just on trips or it can be a way to hike the entire trail; ex: hiking a few states then taking a few months off and hiking another few states until you&#x2019;ve hiked the whole thing. <br /> through hikers and sectional hikers can become part of the 2000 mile club. People with the 2000 miler patch get props when hiking, and in certain places like some hostels, restaurants, and at the conservancy they get free food and/or board. <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Leave no trace is a way of preserving the trail by making as little effect on the wildlife as possible. Though it is primarily on the honor system there are a few laws in place for areas that pass through state and national parks. Ways to &#x201C;leave no trace&#x201D; are: staying on the trail and staying single file to minimize the size of the trail, not littering and picking up trash you see, when making a fire use a pre-made fire pit and use already fallen tinder instead of chopping it down. <br /> Leave no trace also includes making sure that when you use the bathroom on the trail that you&#x2019;re off the trail, dig a hole at least 6in deep, and carry and trash out with you. <br /> <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • There are 165,000 blazes along the length of the Trail. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> These trail blazers help hikers stay on the path and distinguish other paths; like paths to a shelter or to a water source. <br /> Warning signs may also be posted to warn hikers or upcoming dangers and obstacles. <br /> Signs can also be used to give direction and let the hiker know where they are. <br /> photo: www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/2009/03/ <br /> purebound <br /> http://hiketaker.blogspot.com/ <br />
  • On the Appalachian Trail hikers will also come across a lot of views, these are usually on cliffs where there&#x2019;s a clearing through the trees. <br />
  • Because of bacteria in the water hikers can no longer drink untreated water directly out of the stream. The bacteria can cause different illnesses, but the most common is severe vomiting and diarrhea. To drink the water hikers have to use water purifiers like iodine tablets, a water pump, and by boiling the water. <br /> There are pros and cons to each of these methods: the iodine tablets taste disgusting and you have to wait a few minutes to drink the water however it&#x2019;s lightweight and doesn&#x2019;t take up much room in your pack, pumps can be a real work out for your arms to use and take some time to fill up your water bottle they also take up space in your pack and the weight can very however it doesn&#x2019;t make your water taste bad like the iodine and it also filters out leaves and other &#x201C;floaters&#x201D;, boiling also takes a while and you have to make the fire and you have to wait for the water to cool before drinking but it is also very effective. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br />
  • Along the trail there are many different shelters and campsites for hikers to stay in. Some general rules include &#x201C;leaving-no-trace&#x201D;, and letting through hikers or single/ a group of two hikers stay in the shelter instead of large groups, and keeping your food out of animals reach. There are usually things people can hang there food on, but if there is a bear advisory make sure your food is hung up in a tree away from the campsite. (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> There will also be a shelter log, this is for hikers to sign there name and leave a comment if they like. Though it seems like just a social thing it&#x2019;s really a way to track a hiker if they&#x2019;re missing; rangers will use these logs to see where the hiker was last and hopefully be able to get an idea of where they may have been planning to go, and may not have gotten to. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> <br />
  • The AT houses more than 2,000 occurrences of rare, threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species at about 535 sites. (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br /> In &#x201C;Bear Country&#x201D; it is not unusual for hikers to carry pepper spray with them, just incase they do come in contact with a bear. Pepper spray has been proven to be the most effective way of turning back aggressive bears. It is also easy to carry. Bears and other wildlife are frequently easily kept away just by making a lot of noise. Hanging your food and putting it in a bear container is a very effective way of keeping bears away from your food and away from you. (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
  • Over the 2,000+ miles of the Appalachian Trail there are many different terrains that hikers hike through. Some can be leisurely and some can be treacherous and rocky. The northern states like new hampshire and vermont are known for its boulder terrain and steep mountains. Rocky terrain is common but Pennsylvania is infamous and is nick-named &#x201C;the knee and ankle breaker&#x201D;. Maryland and parts of other sections of states have more gradual hills and flat areas. Occasionally hikers will have to cross streams and creeks. The best way to cross these streams is in groups, especially if you have to go against the current. The trail also intersects with many roads and highways. The only precaution here is watching for cars, but most interstates and heavy highways have an overpass to cross. <br /> (O&#x2019;Bannon, Allen. Allen and Mike&#x2019;s Really Cool Backpackin&#x2019; Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) <br /> (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) <br />
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Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche Appalachian Trail by Laila Poche Presentation Transcript

  • (blueridgeoutdoors.com/current-issue/great-falls-national-park-va/) Backpacking and Hiking The Appalachian Trail Laila Poche
  • Thesis Nowadays we are always surround by civilization and its technology. People are so preoccupied on the mayhem in their lives and on having material things that they forget what they already have. Nature is everywhere, but I think sometimes we all forget how beautiful it is. With this project I hope to make people want to go out and explore more of the outdoors.
  • Personal Relevance The Appalachian Trail has become a large part of my life because of the many adventures I’ve experienced on it with my friends. It was an experience like no other and has helped me grow as a person by giving me a chance to be responsible for myself and for my friends.
  • (purebound.com) Backpacking and Hiking
  • Backpacking and hiking A&L cool bp ATCon (purebound.com)
  • Backpacking and hiking A&L cool bp ATCon What is Backpacking? Backpacking vs Hiking Why Do People Do It? It’s allows people to separate themselves from the rest of the world Nature Going at you’re own pace The Challenge (purebound.com)
  • The Appalachian Trail (purebound.com)
  • The AT • About 2,178 miles long (the nations largest marked footpath) • Touches 14 states (Appalachian Trail Conservancy)
  • The AT • from Springer Mountain, Georgia to (thebody.com/content/art12597.html) Mt. Katahdin, Maine (purebound.com)
  • The AT • Harpers Ferry, West Virginia • The “half-way point” • Location of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (purebound.com) (channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/appalachian- trail-3591/Photos)
  • The At • The International AT • Extended into eastern Canada in the 1990’s • about 750 miles in Quebec, New (agiweb.org/geotimes/mar08/article.html?id=geomedia.html) Brunswick and Newfoundland
  • HISTORY • Benton MacKaye • “convinced that the pace of urban and industrial life along the East Coast was harmful to people.” (AT.org). • Arthur Perkins and Myron Avery • Fully completed in 1951 • Earl Shaffer • first man to hike the entire Appalachian Trail in one continuous trip (Appalachian Trail Conservancy) (mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker)
  • Why Hike the AT? • The Challenge • The Rough Terrain • Main and New (mensjournal.com/original-thru-hiker) Hampshire • To Get Away
  • Before going on the trip
  • Prepping Physically for the Trail • Hiking (Practicing) • Around local parks or the neighborhood • Also lets you break in your boots and get to know your pack • Strengthening leg muscle • Injuries • Knee • Hamstrings • Back
  • Muscles Used (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • Muscles Used Abdominals Dorsal Muscles Lumbar Muscles Gluteals Hamstrings Quadriceps Calves (blogs.sun.com/mjsim/resource/ muscle.2.jpg)
  • WHAT TO PACK
  • toothbrush and a first-aid toothpaste kit dehydrated food WHAT TO PACK a cell phone 2 water bottles duct tape and a bladder
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier dehydrated a tent food a lightweight WHAT TO PACK sleeping bag extra hiking a cell phone socks 2 water bottles matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier dehydrated a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK sleeping bag extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat 2 water bottles matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier dehydrated a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK sleeping bag sandals extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat 2 water bottles matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier dehydrated a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit sleeping bag sandals extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat 2 water bottles matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier sun screen dehydrated a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit sleeping bag sandals extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit sleeping bag sandals extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
  • toothbrush comb or hairbrush and a first-aid a small stove toothpaste kit a water purifier sun screen deodorant dehydrated a small wash cloth a tent food toilet paper a few clothing items a lightweight WHAT TO PACK a mess-kit sleeping bag sandals a bandana and hat cards extra hiking a cell phone socks a rain coat and one luxury item 2 water bottles bug-spray matches and a bladder duct tape
  • How to Pack • Accessibility • Keep things you’ll need in easy access, like your map, water, etc • Balance • Weight’s distributed equally on both sides and the heaviest things are against your spine in • Compress • Streamline • Avoid bulging, keep the pack (Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment)
  • Packing (Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment) (Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment)
  • Packing (Allen and Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment)
  • First Aid Kit • Exam gloves • CPR face shield • Bandages: Elastic roll bandage, Adhesive tape, Adhesive bandages, Gauze pads, etc • Splints and a Triangle Bandage • Moleskin/ Blister kit • Alcohol swabs and Antiseptic ointment • Scissors • Tweezers, and/or a Tick removal kit • Ibuprofen (Tylenol etc) campingtourist.com/camping-tips/the-perfect- first-aid-kit-for-your-camping-trip/
  • On the Trail
  • Some Terms You Might Want to Know • Through Hiking: hike of the Trail’s entire length in one season • Section Hiking: The approach to walking the length of the Trail in segments • Trail Magic: Random acts of kindness by nonhikers for through hikers and long distance sectional hikers
  • Courtesies and Responsibilities
  • Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail
  • Courtesies and Responsibilities • Leave No Trace • Staying on Trail • Picking up trash • Collecting fallen wood for fire, not chopping it down
  • Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue
  • Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue Warning Signs
  • Signs Trail Blazers Appalachian Trail- white Water Spring- blue Warning Signs Signs for giving Direction
  • Views
  • Water • Unfortunately today we cant drink right out of the steams anymore • Bacteria can cause hikers to become very sick • Purifying water • iodine tablets • pump (purebound.com) • boiling
  • Shelters • General Rules to Shelters • Keep your food out of reach to animals, especially if there is a bear advisory • Larger groups should let smaller groups and through hikers stay in the trail • Keep the site clean and trash free • Towns • Restock on food, fresh water • Bath and wash clothes
  • Wildlife • Animals can rip into packs and tents • Raccoons, Bears, Deer, Chipmunks • Avoid them by hanging your food or putting it in a bear container
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Terrain • Northern Boulders • New Hampshire and Vermont • Rocky • Pennsylvania • Flat with Hills • Through crossing steams • On intersecting roads and highways purebound.com alaskanalpinetreks.com/ramblings/2010/02/18/many-rivers-to-cross/
  • Application Component
  • Application Component
  • Class Activity
  • Class Activity We’re Going On a “Hike”!
  • Works Cited • “Appalachian Trail Conservancy.” Appalachian Trail Conservancy. Appalachian Trail Conservancy, 2009. Web. 10 Nov. 2009. <http://www.appalachiantrail.org> • Berger, Karen. Backpacking & Hiking. First American Edition ed. New York: DK, 2005. Print. Eyewitness Companions • - - -. Hiking & Backpacking: A Complete Guide. 1995. New York: Norton, 1995. Print. Trailside Ser. Guide • Dunlap, Rachael. “Appalachian Trail Heads North.” Intelligent Travel. National Geographic, 16 Mar. 2009. Web. 5 May 2010. <http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/////trail-heads-north.html> • “Expert Advice: Camping & Hiking.” REI.com. REI, n.d. Web. 30 Nov. 2009. <http://www.rei.com//> • Graeber, Charles. “One Day at a Time on the Five-Million-Step Program.” National Geographic Adventure Magazine June- July 2004: n. pag. National Geographic: One-Stop Research. Web. 30 Nov. 2009. <http:// www.nationalgeographic.com///.html> • Henry, Brice, et al. “The Spirit of the Appalachian Trail.” Interview by David Byers and Kate Russell. The Sprit of the Appalachian Trail. 2009. Google Videos. Web. 13 Apr. 2010. <http://video.google.com/?docid=-3783635289523659971#>. • “How To’s & Hiking Information.” AmericanHiking.org/. Ed. Gregory A. Miller, Ph.D. and Margie Cohen. American Hiking Society, 2009. Web. 30 Nov. 2009. <http://www.americanhiking.org//Tos/> • MacKaye, Benton. “An American Trail: A Project in Regional Planning.” Journal of the American Institute of Architects 9 (Oct. 1921): 325-330. PDF file • O’Bannon, Allen. Allen & Mike’s Really Cool Backpackin’ Book; Traveling & Camping Skills for a Wilderness Environment. Illus. Mike Clelland. 2001. Guilford: FalconGuide, 2001. Print • The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club. Appalachian Trail Guide to Maryland and Northern Virginia With Side Trails. Ed. Melissa L. Lanning. Sixteenth Edition ed. Vienna, VA: Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 2000. Print • Rubin, Robert A., ed. Trail Years: A History of Appalachian Trail Conf. Special 75th Anniversary ed. Spec. issue of Appalachian Trailway News (July 2000): 1-50. Web. 3 Dec. 2009. <http://www.appalachiantrail.org//c.mqLTIYOwGlF/. 4914753/.C511/.htm>.
  • Conclusion The Appalachian Trail is a place to just get away from it all and have your own adventures. Through this project I was able to share a great experience with people that they may never have experienced otherwise.