Paulo Freire <ul><li>By Lisa Hollenbeck  </li></ul><ul><li>EDU 500  </li></ul><ul><li>May 8, 2007 </li></ul>
Biography <ul><li>Freire  was born in Brazil on September 19, 1921. </li></ul><ul><li>Educated  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>trad...
<ul><li>&quot;I’d like to say to us as educators: poor are those among us who lose their capacity to dream, to create thei...
Foundations of Freire <ul><li>To Name </li></ul><ul><li>To Reflect </li></ul><ul><li>To Act </li></ul>
To Name: Named the World <ul><li>Gave a voice to those who were oppressed, so educators who served them could better battl...
Reflection: Dialogue & Conversation <ul><ul><li>'Dialogue', Freire says, 'is the encounter between men, mediated by the wo...
Reflection: Situational Educational Activity <ul><li>Freire was concerned about using the imagination to produce new possi...
To Act: Praxis <ul><li>This action is not merely the doing of something, which Freire describes as activism. ( Taylor, 199...
Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to those who Dare Teach Fourth Letter- On the Indispensable Qualities of progressive...
Progressive Teacher Qualities Create Schools produce: <ul><li>thinking </li></ul><ul><li>participation </li></ul><ul><li>c...
Teachers Rights <ul><li>Freedom in Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>The right to speak </li></ul><ul><li>The right to better con...
Bibliography of Freire Works <ul><li>Education as a Practice of Freedom (1967, 1974)   </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural action f...
Bibliography <ul><li>Freire, P. (2005) Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to Those Who Dare Teach. Westview Press. Colo...
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Paulo Freire Powerpoint Presentation

  1. 1. Paulo Freire <ul><li>By Lisa Hollenbeck </li></ul><ul><li>EDU 500 </li></ul><ul><li>May 8, 2007 </li></ul>
  2. 2. Biography <ul><li>Freire was born in Brazil on September 19, 1921. </li></ul><ul><li>Educated </li></ul><ul><ul><li>traditional upper-class boys private high school. 1934 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>University of Recife in Brazil, law student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ph.D. Thesis, “Present-day Education in Brazil. 1959 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Died May 2, 1997 </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>&quot;I’d like to say to us as educators: poor are those among us who lose their capacity to dream, to create their courage to denounce and announce...&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Paulo Freire </li></ul>
  4. 4. Foundations of Freire <ul><li>To Name </li></ul><ul><li>To Reflect </li></ul><ul><li>To Act </li></ul>
  5. 5. To Name: Named the World <ul><li>Gave a voice to those who were oppressed, so educators who served them could better battle their oppression. </li></ul><ul><li>conscientization - developing consciousness, but consciousness that is understood to have the power to transform reality' (Taylor 1993: 52). </li></ul>
  6. 6. Reflection: Dialogue & Conversation <ul><ul><li>'Dialogue', Freire says, 'is the encounter between men, mediated by the world, in order to name the world'. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Reflection: Situational Educational Activity <ul><li>Freire was concerned about using the imagination to produce new possible ways of naming and acting in the world when working with people around literacy's. (Smith, 2005, http://www.infed.org/thinkers/et-freir.htm#contribution) </li></ul>
  8. 8. To Act: Praxis <ul><li>This action is not merely the doing of something, which Freire describes as activism. ( Taylor, 1993, http://www.infed.org/biblio/b-praxis.htm) </li></ul><ul><li>It is not simply action based on reflection. It is action which embodies qualities which include a commitment to human well being, a search for truth, and a respect for others. (Carr and Kemmis, 1986, pg. 190) </li></ul><ul><li>This enables society to act in ways which produce justice and allow mankind to flourish. (Smith, 2005, http://www.infed.org/thinkers/et-freir.htm#contribution) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to those who Dare Teach Fourth Letter- On the Indispensable Qualities of progressive Teachers for Their Better Performance <ul><li>Attributes Indispensable to Progressive Teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Humility – requiring courage, self-confidence, self-respect, and respect for others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lovingness – no only for the student, but also toward the process of learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Courage – to fight, to love, and to conquer fears to be a political agent of change to improve democracy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tolerance – requires respect, discipline, and ethics. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decisiveness – ability to make decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security – confidence in one’s actions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wisdom – to use both patience and impatience in unison to work patiently impatient, never surrendering entirely to either. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Verbal Parsimony – Those who live in the assumption of patience-impatience will rarely lose control over their words; they will rarely exceed the limits of considered yet energetic discourse. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Progressive Teacher Qualities Create Schools produce: <ul><li>thinking </li></ul><ul><li>participation </li></ul><ul><li>creation </li></ul><ul><li>Speaking/Dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>love </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to guess </li></ul><ul><li>and passionately embraces and says yes to life. </li></ul><ul><li>A school which does not quiet down and quit. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Teachers Rights <ul><li>Freedom in Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>The right to speak </li></ul><ul><li>The right to better conditions for pedagogical work </li></ul><ul><li>The right to paid sabbaticals for continuing education </li></ul><ul><li>The right to be coherent </li></ul><ul><li>The right to criticize the authorities without fear of retaliation. </li></ul><ul><li>The right and duty to be serious and coherent and to not have to lie to survive. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Bibliography of Freire Works <ul><li>Education as a Practice of Freedom (1967, 1974) </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural action for freedom (1968, 1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of the oppressed (1968, 1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Extension or communication? (1969, 1973) </li></ul><ul><li>The political literacy process (1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Witness to liberation, in Seeing education whole (1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Education for Critical Consciousness (1973) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy in Process: The Letters to Guinea Bissau (1977, 1978 ) </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of the act of reading (1982, 1983) </li></ul><ul><li>The politics of education: culture, power and liberation (1985) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of the City (1991, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of Hope (1992, 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to those who dare teach (1993, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Letters to Cristina: reflections on my life and work (1994, 1995) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of Freedom (1997, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of the Heart (1997) </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogy of Indignation (2000, 2004) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Bibliography <ul><li>Freire, P. (2005) Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to Those Who Dare Teach. Westview Press. Colorado. </li></ul><ul><li>Smith, M. K. (2005) Summary of Freire’s main Contributions and problematic areas retreived online on May 1, 2007 at http://fcis.oise.utoronto.ca/~daniel_schugurensky/freire/freirebooks.html </li></ul><ul><li>Torres, C. S. (2002) The Paulo Freire Institute at UCLA retrieved online on May 2, 2007 at http://www.paulofreireinstitute.org/ </li></ul>
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