Basic IL for teachers & librarians

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lecture delivered by Ms. MaryAnn Ingua last May 22, 2008

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  • Basic IL for teachers & librarians

    1. 1. INFORMATION LITERACY FOR TEACHERS, LIBRARIANS AND INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Mary Ann M. Ingua
    2. 2. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society What is Information Literacy? &quot;Information Literacy is the ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.&quot; American Library Assocation. Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report. (Chicago: American Library Association, 1989.) <ul><li>ability to access, and use information from a variety of sources. ( Costa, 1985 ) </li></ul>
    3. 3. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society <ul><li>(a) know when they need information, (b) identify what information will address a particular problem, (c) find the needed information, (d) evaluate the information (e) organize the information, and (f) use of the information effectively in addressing the problem. Information literacy is more than computer literacy and more than library instruction (ALA, 1989) </li></ul>
    4. 4. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Concept Evolution <ul><li>- Kuhlthau’s work pointed the way toward the integration of information literacy with curriculum and presents the current development of the concept of information literacy with the library media center as the starting platform. </li></ul>
    5. 5. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society 1988 - published, “Information Power” (ALA, 1988), national guidelines for school library media programs. The stated mission of “Information Power” is “to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information (ED 315 028, p2). 1989 - concept of information literacy was advanced still further when the first Meeting of the National Forum on Information Literacy (NFIL) took place , NFIL is a coalition of over 60 organizations from business, government, and education sectors, all sharing an interest in and a concern for information literacy.
    6. 6. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Libraries and Literacy <ul><li>Libraries become involved quite early in the adult literacy Campaigns and activities </li></ul><ul><li>school and public library involvement in literacy and reading </li></ul>
    7. 7. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Characteristics of an Information Literate Person DETERMINE the extent of the information needed ACCESS the needed information effectively and efficiently
    8. 8. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society EVALUATE information and its sources critically INCORPORATE selected information into one's knowledge base USE information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
    9. 9. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society UNDERSTAND the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use of information ACCESS and use information ethically and legally. (ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Educationhttp://www.ala.org/acrl/ilintro.html)
    10. 10. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Importance of Information Literacy <ul><li>the need to evaluate the credibility of information </li></ul><ul><li>everyone must be constantly learning. </li></ul><ul><li>increasing quantity of information from all sources and the pressure to remain in a constant state of conscious learning means that we must be dexterous in the use of information </li></ul>
    11. 11. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Information Literacy for Lifelong Learning <ul><li>changing the role of the teacher from presenter of prefabricated facts to facilitator of active learning </li></ul><ul><li>librarian/media specialist as a collaborator in curriculum planning for effective use of information resources </li></ul>
    12. 12. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Information Literacy for Lifelong Learning <ul><li>Information literacy program encourage shifts in the roles of teachers and learners which is essential to prepare learners to live and work in an information-centered society. </li></ul>
    13. 13. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Benefits of Information Literacy For Students <ul><li>students take responsibility for their learning, and they retain more of t he information they have gathered for themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Information literate students are more effective consumers of information resources. </li></ul>
    14. 14. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Benefits of Information Literacy For Students <ul><li>They learn to recognize that information is packaged in a variety of ways, it is packaged using a variety of techniques, it serve a variety of interests, and that it contains a variety of value messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Information literate students are more critical when they make decisions about the resources they use. </li></ul>
    15. 15. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society For Citizens <ul><li>they understand that information is not necessarily knowledge until it has been analyzed, questioned, and integrated into their existing body of knowledge and experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>citizens appreciate the value and power of information. </li></ul><ul><li>believe in the need for information to address problems and questions in their own lives, in their communities, and in society. </li></ul>Benefits of Information Literacy
    16. 16. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society For Workers Benefits of Information Literacy <ul><li>workplace has become a place of disaster change and untold opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>early commitment to learning as a process, not as an end product </li></ul><ul><li>adapting to a rapidly changing work environment will mean multiple career and job changes </li></ul>
    17. 17. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Importance in Higher Education <ul><li>Information literacy is important to higher education, as it is a part of, and contributor to, lifelong learning (Allen, 2000). </li></ul><ul><li>individuals are able to reason and think critically, and learn how to learn, and grow intellectually </li></ul>
    18. 18. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Institution <ul><li>the university or college has an opportunity, and a challenge, to prepare students to meet the demands of the Information Age. </li></ul><ul><li>Institutions need to identify what graduates should know and be able to do </li></ul>
    19. 19. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Institution <ul><li>Institutions must be accountable for how far their students go from the freshmen year to graduation </li></ul>
    20. 20. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Academic Library and Librarian <ul><li>that libraries (and librarians) have an opportunity to improve the quality of undergraduate education by participating in and strengthening information literacy programs. </li></ul><ul><li>academic library becomes a teaching library, which is actively involved in all aspects of higher education – teaching, research and community service. </li></ul>
    21. 21. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society <ul><li>librarians need to become more vocal and more involved with the educational process in order to foster change with regards to the teaching of information literacy (Allen, 2000) </li></ul>The Role and Responsibilities of the Academic Library and Librarian
    22. 22. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Academic Library and Librarian <ul><li>partner to, or collaborator with, the teaching faculty </li></ul>
    23. 23. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Teaching Faculty <ul><li>Faculty and students need to view teaching and learning as a shared responsibility, where students take on more responsibility for their own learning, guided by the faculty (Stanford, 1992). </li></ul>
    24. 24. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society The Role and Responsibilities of the Teaching Faculty <ul><li>Faculties become facilitators of learning helping their students learn how to evaluate information and fit it into the developing framework of knowledge in that course.* </li></ul><ul><li>Faculties can mentor or coach their students, as they work through their own thought processes * </li></ul>*(Breivik, 1992; Jones, 1992; Stanford, 1992).
    25. 25. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Studies, Conferences and Assessment Activities on Information Literacy <ul><li>Information Literacy in the Information Age (Bulaong, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Demographic Assessment of the Information Literacy Competency of Freshmen UPCAT passers at UPLB” (Ingua, 2007) </li></ul>
    26. 26. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Studies, Conferences and Assessment Activities on Information Literacy <ul><li>“ Redefining Roles: Librarians as Partners in Information Literacy Education (William and Zald, 1997) </li></ul><ul><li>““ Information Literacy in Higher Education: A Review and Case Study” (Johnston and Weber, 2003) </li></ul>Model of an Information Literate Student Model of an Information Literate University
    27. 27. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society Methods of Developing Information Literacy Skills <ul><li>Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Reference </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul>
    28. 28. ALL Towards an Information Literate Society   &quot;Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for the rest of his life&quot; (Chinese proverb)

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