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Gml images ch19

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Primary sources for use with Give Me Liberty by Eric Foner.

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  • The Greatest Department Store on Earth, a cartoon from Puck, November 29, 1899, depicting Uncle Sam selling goods, mostly manufactured products, to the nations of the world. The search for markets overseas would be a recurring theme of twentieth-century American foreign policy. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A 1906 pamphlet published by the United Fruit Company, seeking to encourage consumption of bananas grown on its plantations in Central America. United Fruit was a major beneficiary of American interventions in the region. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The World’s Constable, a cartoon commenting on Theodore Roosevelt’s “new diplomacy,” in Judge, January 14, 1905, portrays Roosevelt as an impartial policeman, holding in one hand the threat of force and in the other the promise of the peaceful settlement of disputes. Roosevelt stands between the undisciplined nonwhite peoples of the world and the imperialist powers of Europe and Japan. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The White Man’s Burden, a 1916 political cartoon depicting Woodrow Wilson attempting to carry Mexico over a difficult landscape. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • An airplane flies over Washington, D.C., in 1910. World War I would reveal the military uses for this new technology. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The liner Lusitania, pictured on a “peace” postcard. Its sinking by a German submarine in 1915 strengthened those who wished to see the United States enter the European war. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A 1916 Wilson campaign truck (a new development in political campaigning), promising peace, prosperity, and preparedness. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A poster addressed to Jewish immigrants by the U.S. Food Administration proclaims, “Food Will Win the War.” It adds, “You came here seeking freedom, now you must help preserve it.” Copies were also printed in other European languages. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A female figure wearing a cap of liberty rings the liberty bell in this patriotic illustration from 1918. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A vivid example of the anti-German propaganda produced by the federal government to encourage prowar sentiment during World War I. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Women during World War I: two women hauling ice—a job confined to men before the war. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Women during World War I: women’s suffrage demonstrators in front of the White House. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A 1915 cartoon showing the western states where women had won the right to vote. Women in the East reach out to a western woman carrying a torch of liberty. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The Liberty Bell, formed by 25,000 soldiers at Camp Dix, New Jersey in 1918, another example of the use of an image of liberty to inspire patriotic sentiment during World War I. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Civilians apprehended in a 1918 “slacker raid.” In a three-day drive in New York City, government agents stopped and questioned 61,000 men. About 1,500 were arrested for failing to carry draft cards. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The Lion’s Club of Trenton, New Jersey, displayed this billboard in 1922, urging native-born Americans to help immigrants assimilate. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Graduates of the Ford English School at the conclusion of their 1916 graduation ceremony. Dressed in their traditional national costumes, they disembarked from an immigrant ship into a giant melting pot. After teachers stirred the pot with ladles, the Ford workers emerged in American clothing, carrying American flags. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A 1919 Americanization pageant in Milwaukee, in which immigrants encounter Abraham Lincoln and the Statue of Liberty. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A cartoon from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 17, 1906, commenting on the lynching of three black men in Springfield, Missouri. The shadow cast by the Statue of Liberty forms a gallows on the ground. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • W. E. B. Du Bois, founder of the NAACP and editor of its magazine, The Crisis, in his New York office. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • A black veteran watches his regiment parade in New York City after the end of the war. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • The silent parade down Fifth Avenue, July 28, 1917, in which 10,000 black marchers protested the East St. Louis race riot. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • An advertisement placed by a steel company in a Pittsburgh newspaper announces, in several languages, that the steel strike of 1919 "has failed." The use of the figure of Uncle Sam illustrates how the companies clothed their anti-union stance in the language of patriotism. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Local police with literature seized from a Communist Party office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 1919. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Part of the crowd that greeted President Wilson in November 1918 when he traveled to Paris to take part in the peace conference. An electric sign proclaims “Long Live Wilson.” Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Interrupting the Ceremony, a 1918 cartoon from the Chicago Tribune, depicts Senate opponents of the Versailles Treaty arriving just in time to prevent the United States from becoming permanently ensnared in “foreign entanglements” through the League of Nations. Give Me Liberty!: An American History, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2007 W.W. Norton & Company
  • Transcript of "Gml images ch19"

    1. 1. Ch. 19, Image 1
    2. 2. Ch. 19, Image 2
    3. 3. Ch. 19, Image 3
    4. 4. Ch. 19, Image 4
    5. 5. Ch. 19, Image 5
    6. 6. Ch. 19, Image 6
    7. 7. Ch. 19, Image 7
    8. 8. Ch. 19, Image 8
    9. 9. Ch. 19, Image 9
    10. 10. Ch. 19, Image 11
    11. 11. Ch. 19, Image 12
    12. 12. Ch. 19, Image 13
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    21. 21. Ch. 19, Image 22
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    24. 24. Ch. 19, Image 25
    25. 25. Ch. 19, Image 26
    26. 26. Ch. 19, Image 27
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