Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Eatwell
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Eatwell

5,549

Published on

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,549
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
148
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The eatwell plate
  • 2. Learning objectives <ul><li>To recognise the eatwell plate. </li></ul><ul><li>To recognise the nutrients found in each food group. </li></ul><ul><li>To understand that salt and some fluids are not shown on the eatwell plate. </li></ul><ul><li>To know how the eatwell plate can be used with composite foods. </li></ul>
  • 3. The eatwell plate <ul><li>The eatwell plate shows the types and proportions of different foods needed to make up a healthy balanced diet. </li></ul><ul><li>The eatwell plate does not have to apply to every meal. Balance can be achieved over a day or several days. </li></ul><ul><li>The eatwell plate is for everyone over two years of age. </li></ul>
  • 4. The food groups of the eatwell plate <ul><li>Fruit and vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>Bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods. </li></ul><ul><li>Milk and dairy foods. </li></ul><ul><li>Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein. </li></ul><ul><li>Food and drinks high in fat and/or sugar. </li></ul>
  • 5. Fruit and vegetables <ul><li>This group provides: </li></ul><ul><li>Dietary fibre (NSP); </li></ul><ul><li>Vitamins A, C; </li></ul><ul><li>Minerals; </li></ul><ul><li>Water or fluid. </li></ul>One third of the diet should be made up of these foods.
  • 6. Fruit and vegetables <ul><li>Fruit and vegetables are good sources of dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to eat at least five portions a day. </li></ul><ul><li>Eat a wide variety of different fruits and vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>These are high in dietary fibre which keeps the gut healthy. </li></ul><ul><li>Fruit and vegetables are also low in energy and fat which can help to maintain a healthy weight. </li></ul>
  • 7. Bread, rice, potatoes and pasta and other starchy foods. <ul><li>This group provides: </li></ul><ul><li>Carbohydrate; </li></ul><ul><li>Dietary fibre (NSP); </li></ul><ul><li>B vitamins; </li></ul><ul><li>Minerals, e.g. iron and calcium. </li></ul>One third of the diet should be made up of these foods.
  • 8. Bread, rice, potatoes and pasta and other starchy foods. <ul><li>This group is made up of bread, rice, potatoes and pasta. These foods provide the body with energy. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different types of starchy foods available. For example, </li></ul><ul><li>Bread: bagel, naan, chapatti, and soda bread. </li></ul><ul><li>Rice: basmati, aborio, and wild rice. </li></ul><ul><li>Potatoes: charlotte, desiree and nadine. </li></ul><ul><li>Pasta: macaroni, risoni, penne, and spaghetti. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to choose wholegrain varieties where possible. </li></ul>
  • 9. Milk and dairy foods <ul><li>This group provides: </li></ul><ul><li>Protein; </li></ul><ul><li>Calcium; </li></ul><ul><li>Vitamin A. </li></ul>A moderate amount of these foods are needed in the diet.
  • 10. Milk and dairy foods <ul><li>This group is made up of milk, yogurt and cheese. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different types of milk and dairy foods available. For example, </li></ul><ul><li>Milk: cow’s milk, goat’s milk and sheep’s milk. </li></ul><ul><li>Yogurt: live, probiotic and bio yogurts. </li></ul><ul><li>Cheese: cheddar, parmesan, mozzarella, and stilton. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to choose lower fat varieties where possible. Children under the age of 2 should be offered whole or full fat products. Children under the age of 5 can be offered semi-skimmed products, but not skim products. </li></ul>
  • 11. Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein <ul><li>This group provides: </li></ul><ul><li>Protein; </li></ul><ul><li>Vitamins, e.g. A, B, D; </li></ul><ul><li>Minerals, e.g. iron. </li></ul>A moderate amount of these foods are needed in the diet.
  • 12. Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein <ul><li>This group is made up of meat, fish, eggs, and beans. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different types of these foods available. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>Meat: beef, lamb, pork and chicken. </li></ul><ul><li>Fish: salmon, haddock and pilchards. </li></ul><ul><li>Beans: Borlotti, haricot, butter, and kidney. </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing fish with soft edible bones can increase your mineral intake, e.g. calcium. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, choosing lean meat and not adding fat when cooking will reduce the amount of fat in the diet. </li></ul>
  • 13. Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein <ul><li>Two portions of fish should be consumed twice a week, one of which should be oily. </li></ul><ul><li>This is because oily fish contains omega 3 fatty acids and believed to be good for heart health. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of oily fish are salmon, herring and sardines. </li></ul>
  • 14. Food and drinks high in fat and/or sugar <ul><li>This group provides: </li></ul><ul><li>Fat; </li></ul><ul><li>Carbohydrate (sugars). </li></ul>Foods from this group are not necessary for a healthy diet, but can be enjoyed occasionally. These foods should be eaten in small amounts.
  • 15. Food and drinks high in fat and/or sugar <ul><li>This group is made up of food and drinks high in fat and/or sugar. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many different types of these foods available. For example, </li></ul><ul><li>Foods high in fat: oil, chips, cake. </li></ul><ul><li>Foods high in sugar: sweets, cakes, and some carbonated drinks. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to eat these foods occasionally and in small amounts. </li></ul>
  • 16. Salt <ul><li>Salt does not appear on the eatwell plate. </li></ul><ul><li>It is estimated that 75% of the salt we eat comes from the food we buy, such as bread and cereal products, meat products and some ready meals. It is important to check the labels when buying foods. </li></ul><ul><li>Salt intake can be further reduced by not adding salt to food during cooking or at the table. </li></ul>
  • 17. Fluid <ul><li>The eatwell plate shows some fluids such as milk and fruit juice in food groups. </li></ul><ul><li>On average the body needs 2 litres of fluid a day to help the body function properly. This is the same as roughly 6-8 glasses of fluid. </li></ul><ul><li>Water, tea and coffee are not shown, but can form a large part of the body’s fluid intake. </li></ul><ul><li>All food and drinks count towards fluid intake, </li></ul><ul><li>except alcoholic drinks. </li></ul>
  • 18. Fluid - alcohol <ul><li>Alcohol does not feature on the eatwell plate, but those who drink there are recommendations </li></ul><ul><li> ● Males - no more than 3-4 units per day </li></ul><ul><li> ● Women - no more than 2-3 units per day. </li></ul><ul><li>Over consumption of alcohol, or binge drinking should be avoided. </li></ul>
  • 19. Fluid – one unit of alcohol <ul><li>One unit of alcohol is: </li></ul><ul><li>half a pint of standard strength (3 to 5% ABV) beer, lager or cider; </li></ul><ul><li>a pub measure of spirit; </li></ul><ul><li>half a glass of wine is about 2 units; </li></ul><ul><li>two thirds of an Alcopops. </li></ul>How many units of alcohol would this be?
  • 20. Composite foods <ul><li>Much of the food people eat is in the form of dishes or meals rather than individual foods, e.g. pizzas, casseroles, lasagne, and sandwiches. </li></ul><ul><li>These are called composite foods. </li></ul><ul><li>Composite foods are made up from more than one food group from the eatwell plate. </li></ul>
  • 21. Composite foods <ul><li>Think about how these foods combine the groups of </li></ul><ul><li>the eatwell plate. </li></ul>

×