Social Media In Prevention #wspc2011
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Social Media In Prevention #wspc2011

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A getting started 101 social media workshop at the Wisconsin State Prevention Conference, June, 2011 through the Central Regional Team for the Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies. ...

A getting started 101 social media workshop at the Wisconsin State Prevention Conference, June, 2011 through the Central Regional Team for the Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies. All materials, links and resources at http://technologyinprevention.wikispaces.com/wspc2011

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  • Welcome
  • How many in our group today uses Twitter? (show of hands) Our hashtag today is WSPC2011 for Wisconsin State Prevention Conference For those who don’t use twitter –but want to see what others who do are saying, you can look up the messages (tweets) posted today by going to http://search.twitter.com and searching for #WSPC2011.
  • What made you choose this workshop? I’m assuming you are curious and want to learn more about social media. But what? Turn to the person next to you and describe where you find yourself curious about social media? You have 2 minutes. (set timer)Harvest
  • Review distinctions between traditional media, social marketing and social media Identify & Share examples and tools Choose at least one action step to engage people in prevention via social media
  • Social media is people. Doing all the things people do – meeting, texting, learning, working, protesting, serving, greeting …
  • So what are all these?These are Social media tools and they are a few of the many ways we talk with each other, share resources and insights and most of all, learn from and with each other.
  • So, social media is another channel for communications … like tv, radio, and newspapers, right? Not exactly.So how is social media the same or different from other media?
  • These have been the tools in our toolkit for our work for the past 50+ years. But things are changing, dramatically.What’s been happening to newspapers this past year? (dropping like flies)And what shift is television making relative to social media? (Television is going social e.g., iReporter (CNN), “green room chat”, apps CNN, MSNBC. What’s happening to radio? (Internet radio shows, satellite radio)
  • At some point along the way, we figured out if we were going to reach a lot of people to raise awareness and to some degree educate people – we could do social messaging using these media. Afterall, we were selling ideas. We took traditional media methods and applied them to social messages. Can you give me an example or two? (e.g., This is your Brain on Drugs; The Truth Campaign; The Anti-Drug; Op eds, Ads, Articles, PSAs, in some cases shows like Addiction, Intervention
  • At first we were seeing through our traditional media lens. Afterall we have two complete fields – marketing and public relations – that thrive in the mainstream media environment – developng messages, monitoring media, running interference. So it isn’t surprising that social media at first looked like just another “channel”. Marketing and PR jumped in with traditional “push”. What they didn’t count on – is the voice of the people formerly known as the audience – talking back!
  • Enter. Social Media.Social media is like having that fifth gear – it’s a whole new ride. Just like the Guttenberg press changes printing forever, making printed materials available for less cost – social media is doing something quite similar for our time.We each have a design, printing, publishing and distributions system on our desks.
  • John Seeley Brown and colleagues at Harvard describe the early conditions as the Age of Push. Most of our media was simple one way – from the networks to the people. He calls this “push”. We were along for the ride with few options for influencing mainstream media.
  • Whether online or offline we can: connect (join), comment (conversations, likes, follows, RTs), Collaborate (wikis, Google Docs), Listen-Learn (track/monitor data), Share (publish your stuff and links to others who are doing interesting and engaging work). Weave it all together to create your online presence. Remember: Social media is a grassroots tool – little or no cost and all it takes is a computer, Internet connection and a browser (or mobile)Online/offline should be reflective of the other. When we meet we talk about what we’ve accessed and learned online in the groups with which we belong. When online we carry F2F conversations with us to inform online discussions.
  • We learn and are influence in the conversations we engage in and we cross-pollinate to other groups we frequent or that others from our group frequent. Experts don’t have to be isolated – but can be networked with others, placing everyone in closer proximity, reducing barriers of time and geography when it comes to learning with and from each otherWe still have hierarchies and they are still important; And now we can connect not only top down but bottom up and across networks.
  • Now the audience talks back! Using a HUGE variety of tools – facebook, twitter, texting, blogs, and location-based services -- that ramp up the volume and expose what has often been hidden. The back talk isn’t always consistent with marketing and public information strategies! BP chose to do the traditional public information approach for “message control”. How’d that work for them? Photo Source: Creative Commonshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/11018968@N00/4656148830
  • Our mom’s taught us that we have two ears and one mouth so that means we should spend twice as much time listening as talking. A good rule for social media. Find the key people you want and need to listen to and make it a regular practice. How do you do that?
  • Activity – mapping your partners, members, stakeholders. Beginning with those you work with most often and branching out to include those you meet with, do projects with or otherwise support in the community.
  • Take the list from the activity and make the “who” side as complete as possible. Once you have a healthy list of WHO your members, stakeholders and supporters are and as much specific contact information as possible, then research their social media presence. Where do they engage online? Do they have RSS feeds that you can subscribe to and follow? Do they host a FB page that you can “like”? A twitter account to follow? Etc.
  • Given what you’ve discovered about your network, where does it make most sense for you to be present online? Where are your people? What are your communications needs? Where do you “push”? Where do you “pull”?
  • How the community thinksWhat the community valuesWhere people go for information What is being said about the issues, topic or organization Where are the conversations happening
  • Tell the Sarah Story about setting this up and getting a hit the very first day.
  • Icon source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/programwitch/362848115/
  • We learn and are influence in the conversations we engage in and we cross-pollinate to other groups we frequent or that others from our group frequent. Experts don’t have to be isolated – but can be networked with others, placing everyone in closer proximity, reducing barriers of time and geography when it comes to learning with and from each otherWe still have hierarchies and they are still important; And now we can connect not only top down but bottom up and across networks.
  • Given what you’ve discovered about your network, where does it make most sense for you to be present online? Where are your people? What are your communications needs? Where do you “push”? Where do you “pull”?
  • What are you involved in that you can post, update, tweet or otherwise celebrate? Who’s stories, besides your own, could you tell? What will help you raise awareness or build capacity in your community?
  • In larger context. Describe Home, Outposts, and Passports. Four pillar areas – Connect & Listen, Network & Communicate, Contribute & Create Buzz and Participate & Collaborate. Each has suggested actions. Most important – do you hold an intention to learn? Will you act with an intention to serve the common good (the good of your group and others?)You’ll find that your presence evolves over time and you’ll join and prune memberships as conditions change and your needs or interests change.
  • Listening opens the door to connecting in surprising ways with other coalitions you might not have met otherwise.  Photo: used with permission http://www.flickr.com/photos/dmswart/1003713064/sizes/m/
  • Listening opens the door to commenting, reviewing and contributing your own insights, experience and gifts to the conversation.
  • Once in awhile the listening opens the door to correcting misinformation.  Walk gently, speak in ways that people can hear what you have to say. (no preaching or judgment). Better to ask questions that help you understand the circumstances.
  • Listening opens the door to sharing and networking in ways that amplify the topic, campaign, or idea -- creating buzz on the Net. Creating buzz is the equivalent of cross-pollination on the Web - sharing ideas and information that matters.
  • Listening opens the door to participation and collaboration on projects. 
  • In your lifetime, how has communication changed? Letters? Faxes? Does anyone here remember “party lines”? Or wall phones with curly cords that tethered you? Do you remember BA – before answering machines? Bag phones? Brick phones?

Social Media In Prevention #wspc2011 Social Media In Prevention #wspc2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Social Media in PreventionWisconsin State Prevention Conference
    LaDonna Coy, MHR, CPS, CDLA
  • LaDonna Coy, MHR, CPS, CDLA
  • #Hashtag
    #WSPC2011
    http://search.twitter.com
    View slide
  • Where
    are you
    curious
    about
    Social
    Media?
    View slide
  • Objectives
    • Review media distinctions
    • See how the landscape has changed
    • Assess positions in the landscape
    • Assess our orientation to push/pull
    • Use capacity building tools
    • Identify & share examples & tools
    • Choose a single action step
  • What is . . .
    Social
    Media?
  • What are all these things then?
    Social
    Media
    Tools
  • So,
    Social
    Media
    is just
    another
    Channel?
    Not exactly.
  • Traditional Media
    Newspaper
    Radio
    Television
  • Social Marketing
    }
    Social marketing is like
    Traditional Media with a Social Twist
  • Social Media Marketing
    Oooh, more
    V
    Channels
    Reach
    Message
    Control
    PR
  • The Social Media Shift
  • The Age of Push
    Content
    Broadcast
    Control
    Marketing
    Brown et al. (2010) The Power of Pull
  • The  Age of Pull
    Comment
    Connect
    offline
    Collaborate
    Share
    Listen-Learn
    online
  • Pull= Networked Expertise
    Knowledge gets shared throughout Networks
  • Remember the Gulf Oil Disaster?
  • Turn the Megaphone Around
    Listen
  • Assessment
    Who
    are your
    People?
  • Mapping Presence
    Where?
    Who?
  • Social
    Presence
    Defining
    Media
  • Why do we listen?
    be informed about issues and norms
    • understand & honor perspectives 
    • engage in conversations that matter
    • opportunities to interact with the community 
    • learn with and from our community
  • Listen & Track
  • So, how
    do you get
    startedwith
  • http://alerts.google.com
  • Type of Search
  • How often?
  • Your Email
  • Really
    Simple
    Syndication
    RSS is …
  • RSS is … the waiter
  • Delivering Your Order
  • So,
    Now what?
  • Listening Tracking
  • Listening Tracking - Source
    Coalition
    Provider
    Agency/Org 
    Main Stream Media
    Individual
  • Listening Tracking - Sentiment
    Positive
    Negative
    Neutral
  • Track it ... then what?
  • Pull= Networked Expertise
    Knowledge gets shared throughout Networks
  • Social
    Presence
    Defining
    Media
  • Social
    Presence
    Defining
    Media
    Website
    FB
    Twitter
  • Social
    Presence
    Defining
    Media
    Website
    FB
    Conferences
    Meetings
    Events
    Stories
    Other
    Papers
    Media
    Data
    Blogs
    Articles
    Editorials
    Twitter
  • Connect
    Listen
    Learn
    Collaborate
    Share
    Comment
    Weave Your Presence
  • SoMe & Community Framework
  • Listening
    opens the
    Door to ...
  •  Connect
    Image Used with permission: dswart
  • Comment &
    Contribute
  • Correct
    Misinformation
  • Create Buzz
    Share&
    Network
  • Participate &
       Collaborate
  • Share
    Your Stories?
  • What
    Questions
    do you have?
  • What one step will you take to increase your Presence online?
  • References & Resources
    Twitter feed, http://search.twitter.com enter #wspc2011
    Slides at http://www.slideshare.net/ladcoy
    All other tools posted to: http://technologyinprevention.wikispaces.com/WISC2011
    Social Media & Community Framework http://bit.ly/axnlOm
    Social Media-Traditional Media Distinctions (PDF) http://bit.ly/m2pzrq
    Brown et al, (2010) The Power of Pull
    HBR A Brief History of the Power of Pull http://bit.ly/moQs9e
    Li & Bernoff, (2009) Groundswell
    Kanter & Fine (2010) The Networked Nonprofit
    Block, P. Community: (2009)The Structure of Belonging
    Block, P. (2010) The Abundant Community
    Shirky, C. (2009) Here Comes Everybody
    Social Networking (Forrester) http://bit.ly/9H12cn
  • Photo Citations
    Photo Source: Creative Commonshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/11018968@N00/4656148830
    Remaining photo from istockphoto.com or my personal archive
  • This presentation is licensed under CREATIVE COMMONS.
    This means you can use it, or parts thereof, as long as appropriate attribution is given and your resulting product is made available under this same license. The license prohibits using this presentation for commercial purposes. A list of citations and links is included for your reference and use. Please cite all creative commons photos to the original source.
    Suggested Attribution:
    Source: LaDonna Coy, MHR, CPS, CDLA for the Wisconsin State Prevention Conference, June 14-16, 2011. Delivered in agreement with the Central Regional Team, Centers for the Application of Prevention Technologies.