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SXSW Interactive 2009 Report Presentation Transcript

  • 1. SXSW INTERACTIVE FESTIVAL Conference Notes Lori Marino March 26, 2009
  • 2. AGENDA
    • WHAT IS SXSW?
    • HOW TO SPEAK GEEK
    • MAKE YOURSELF MORE INTERESTING
    • BRANDING IN FOUR DIMENSIONS
    • THE SEARCH FOR A MORE SOCIAL WEB
    • UX TEAM OF ONE
    • JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF DESIGN
    • SOCIAL MEDIA TO CONNECT WITH CUSTOMERS
    • WIREFRAMES FOR THE WICKED
    • WEB STANDARDS PROJECT
    • UNIVERSAL BY DESIGN
    • TRENDING TOPICS
  • 3. WHAT IS SXSW?
    • South by Southwest Interactive Festival (SXSWi) is part of a larger festival that also includes Music and Film. The interactive festival is an event that celebrates the best minds and the brightest personalities of emerging technology.
    • Features five days of exciting panel content that consist of approximately 490 sessions.
    • SXSW Interactive Festival has a reputation as a breeding ground for new ideas and creative technologies.
    • Attendees range from hard-core geeks to web designers, content creators, and new media entrepreneurs.
    • The notes in these slides are limited in scope and based on the sessions I attended. They are not intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the conference.
  • 4.  
  • 5. HOW TO SPEAK GEEK
    • Memescape (noun) – the collection of all things currently existing or becoming massive cultural phenomena on the web, and the underlying pattern that connects them (LOL Cats)
    • The Cloud (noun) – a world existing in part or in total on the Interwebs and/or via electronic/telephonic/cellular communication, such as texting
    • Grok (verb) – to understand something so intuitively and with such empathy that you internalize it
    • Whuffie (noun) – “social capital” or the currency of the future
    • Crowd-sourcing (transitive verb) - for a blogger, crowd-sourcing is just outsourcing your research. For example, pose a question on Twitter and wait for the responses. The CEO of Forrester does this.
    • Microformats (noun) - a set of simple, open data formats built upon existing and widely adopted standards for developing better structured web microcontent publishing
    Source: The Austin Chronicle - http://www.austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Issue/story?oid=oid%3A751396
  • 6. MAKE YOURSELF MORE INTERESTING
    • Lane Becker, Get Satisfaction and Founder, Adaptive Path
    • Kristina Halvorson, President, Brain Traffic
    • DL Byron, Publisher, Bike Hugger
    • Amit Gupta (Founder, Photojojo)
    • Brian Oberkirch, Small Good Thing
    • Experiment – avoid measuring and analyzing
    • Apprentice yourself to great work
    • Give side projects front and center time
    • Focus on “delicious details
    • Find stuff you think is cool and share it around – this is how you develop reach and influence
    • Sustainable awesomeness – Plan – Create – Publish – Govern (the care and feeding of your epic stuff)
    • Talk to people like they are human beings
    • Marketing is now a 2-way conversation
  • 7. BRANDING IN FOUR DIMENSIONS
    • Jamie Monberg, Interactive Director, Hornall Anderson
    • Interactive is not just about digital.
    • Successful brands empower their users through interactive design.
    • It’s our responsibility to help brands become more interactive, whether it’s through a digital form or otherwise.
    • It’s more important than ever to connect with consumers in a meaningful, relevant way and to interact in a way that creates or supports a relationship.
    • When it comes to design, consider the cognitive load. In other words, make sure the tools aren’t too complex.
    Podcast download
  • 8. BRANDING IN FOUR DIMENSIONS
    • Jamie Monberg, Interactive Director, Hornall Anderson
    • “ Transparency is the cost of entry. It’s not a choice.”
    • Brands that embrace transparency not only can develop a more authentic dialogue with consumers, they can also stand to profit more as a result.
    Dialog Interactivity Authenticity
  • 9. THE SEARCH FOR A MORE SOCIAL WEB
    • Dave Morin, Platform Manager, Facebook
    • Computers have largely been
    • antisocial - it was only with the
    • advent of the computer that
    • we’ve been playing games
    • with ourselves. Only in the last
    • few years have computers
    • really started to become social.
    • Facebook Connect allows users to make their identities portable.
    • It allows us to see what our friends are up to – he jokes “If your friend does something on the internet and nobody knows about it, did it actually happen?”.
    • TechCrunch comments have become more authentic than ever before because users can log in with real names, which are linked to their Facebook accounts (using Facebook Connect).
  • 10. UX TEAM OF ONE
    • Leah Buley, Adaptive Path
    • This session focused on tips for working as a user experience team of one. Leah recommended a process to come up with several ideas before deciding on one. As ideas are refined, the best ones begin to emerge.
    • Brainstorm (without using the computer) – instead, using paper and pen and various brainstorming tools:
      • 6-up template: use to sketch ideas. You’ll hit a wall after two. Keep going and fill out all 6 sketches
      • Conceptual frameworks: spectrum, 2x2’s, grids, word associations, inspiration library
    • Assemble an ad-hoc team (project managers, developers, etc.)
      • Organize a workshop with populated sketchboards using butcher paper on a wall
      • Host open design sessions
      • Give them a problem and ask them to help solve it
  • 11. UX TEAM OF ONE
    • Leah Buley, Adaptive Path
    • Pick the best ideas:
      • Come up with 5-7 pithy statements about what you want the experience to be
      • Define the “Quiddity” of the experience (e.g. Google Calendar)
          • “ Fast, visually appealing and joyous to use”
          • “ Your whole life in one place”
    • Wireframes are obsolete
      • Move from sketches to interactive prototype
      • Add sketches to PPT and include hyperlinks to simulate interactivity
    • Helpful tools & Resources
      • Adaptive path workshop: “From sketching to prototyping in two days”
      • Slides for this presentation at www.slideshare.net/ugleah
      • www.adaptivepath.com/ideas
      • “ Concept Share” – tool for sharing creative concepts remotely
  • 12. JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF DESIGN
    • Jared Spool, User Interface Engineering
    • Discussed concepts of “self-design” (37 Signals) vs. “user-centered design” (Don Norman)
    • There is no evidence that user-centered design has ever worked
    • Apple doesn’t do much usability testing anymore. Microsoft does thousands of user tests every year. What does that tell you?
    • Don’t always do things the same way. Methodologies can be too limiting.
    • It’s about good teamwork. If everyone works together toward the same end, you’ll be much better off than people working alone and complaining.
    • Beware of “voodoo” techniques like eye tracking and analytics.
    • It’s about time we replaced the user-centered design dogma with informed design.
  • 13. JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF DESIGN
    • Jared Spool, User Interface Engineering
    • Three core user experience attributes:
      • Vision
      • Feedback Loop
      • Culture
    • Three questions for implementing informed design:
    • Can everyone on the team describe the experience of using your design five years from now? (Vision)
    • In the last six weeks, have you spent more than two hours watching someone use your design (or a competitor’s)?
    • In the past six weeks, have you rewarded a team member for a major design failure? (Intuit has a culture that accepts mistakes and learns from them.)
    • Resources: www.uie.com/brainsparks , www.uiconf.com , UIE tips newsletter
  • 14. SOCIAL MEDIA TO CONNECT WITH CUSTOMERS
    • Hosted by Chris Boller, Digital and Social Technology Lead, Razorfish with panelists from H&R Block, J.C. Penney and Carnival Cruise Lines
    • H&R Block: Customer connections build a lifelong relationship
      • They use Facebook, MySpace, widgets for Blogs with latest tax news
      • YouTube as a showcase for TV commercials
      • Client Community – populated year-round with content related to events, health benefit enrollment time, school enrollment, etc.
      • On Twitter since 2007 (@HRBlock)
      • Superbowl campaign – Cyclops
      • Yahoo answers – tax questions answered, powered by 100,000 H&R Block tax professionals
    • J.C. Penney
      • Created the “Doghouse” viral video to create awareness around jewelry stores in J.C. Penney
      • Video created by Sachi & Sachi and DeBeers. New Media Strategies did the seeding, banner ads, etc.
      • 4.1 million views, 60% completion rate
  • 15. SOCIAL MEDIA TO CONNECT WITH CUSTOMERS
    • Hosted by Chris Boller, Digital and Social Technology Lead, Razorfish with panelists from H&R Block, J.C. Penney and Carnival Cruise Lines
    • Carnival Cruise Lines
    • Cruising is inherently social
    • Social media team consists of: strategist, community manager and two specialists
    • Created a community in 2005 around a group planning tool that included forums. The planning tool didn’t take off, but the forums did.
    • On Twitter since 2007 (@carnivalcruise)
    • One of their cruise directors, John Heald, has a very successful blog
    • Like branding, social media is difficult to measure. If you don’t use it, you run the risk of alienating the younger generation.
  • 16. WIREFRAMES FOR THE WICKED
    • Michael Angeles, Nick Finck, Donna Spencer
    • Reviewed six types of wireframes:
    • Reference zones, high fidelity, story boards, standalone, specification, sketch style
    • Each project may require a different process, depending on needs. Sketches? Wireframes? Interactive prototypes?
    • Helpful resources and tools:
    • Balsamiq.com – mockups
    • Viseo stencils available on Nick’s personal site. Viseo has a sketch style?
    • Omnigraffle sketch stencils
    • Protoshare – prototyping software for creating interactive prototypes
    • Slides of this presentation with details of each type of wireframe available on slideshare.
  • 17. WIREFRAMES FOR THE WICKED Moving from Sketching to Wireframing
  • 18. WEB STANDARDS PROJECT
    • Derek Featherstone, Accessibility Consultant and WaSP Team Lead; Glenda Sims, Stefanie Sullivan, Adobe Task Force; Aaron Gustafson, developer, A List Apart
    • This session was the annual meeting of the Web Standards Project (WaSP). The Web Standards Project is a volunteer, grassroots coalition fighting for standards which ensure simple, affordable access to web technologies for all.
    • Microsoft and IE8
    • WaSP has a joint task force with Microsoft to work collaboratively on IE8
    • The entire rendering engine for IE8 was re-written, and is the first browser to be fully compliant with CSS 2.1 specs.
    • IE8 has a compatibility list. It will list your site if it is not standards compliant. Molly Holzschlag refers to it as a “black list”
    • We need to make sure that thomsonreuters.com is compliant
    • WaSP has started an educational organization to aid in the adoption of standards: http://interact.webstandards.org
  • 19. WEB STANDARDS PROJECT
    • Aaron Gustafson, developer, A List Apart
    • This is where the term “Progressive Enhancement” originated, which is sometimes referred to as the “three layer cake”.
    • “ Build it so it doesn’t break
    • from the ground up.”
    Learn more on this topic from Aaron’s article on A List Apart
  • 20. UNIVERSAL BY DESIGN
    • James Craig, Apple, WaSp, WC3
    Universal Design - “ Design that is so thoughtful, it works for everyone.” Things that now being worked on to accommodate the disabled will be cool for everyone (eg: hatpics).
    • Examples of universal design:
    • Cuts in the curb to accommodate wheelchairs
    • Closed captioning
    • Text messaging, which has replaced TTY machines
    • The future:
    • Haptics – receiving feedback based on the sense of touch
      • The Navy’s tactile situational awareness system
      • Haptic radar headband
  • 21. TRENDING TOPICS
    • Using GPS and location to enhance social networking
    • Interoperability of various social networking apps. For example, many are beginning to gravitate to “O Auth” for authentication. Move toward openness and sharing.
    • Games on the iPhone, especially Facebook games using their new API (Facebook Connect). Playfish launched Facebook games on the iPhone during SXSW.
    • Web Fonts - The technology is available to display custom fonts in the browser using an embedding method (@font-face). There are issues with type foundries with regard to licensing, but since Thomson Reuters owns its corporate font, this should not be an issue for us. For more information, see:
      • http://sxswtypography.com : describes how to use @font-face to display custom fonts
      • http://webfonts.info : much info on @font-face embedding
      • http://webtypography.net