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2012_Redwoods Group Presentation
 

2012_Redwoods Group Presentation

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  • AgendaAbout UsOur StrategiesKey Trends child well-being in North CarolinaHow children in Wake County fareTaking action for childrenQuestions
  • Action for Children employs seven main strategies in pursuit of these goals, including: Applied Research & Data:  Action for Children continuously analyzes the current data and research on child well-being and presents it in user-friendly format for policymakers, advocates and the general public.Communications & Media Advocacy:  Action for Children works with the media to educate North Carolinians about how children in our state are faring and how we can improve their lives.Outreach:  Action for Children provides technical assistance to communities statewide on how to use data and research to improve conditions for children and young people.Convening/Facilitating:  Action for Children brings together partner organizations to pool knowledge and coordinate public policy approaches.Education:  Action for Children informs law makers and community advocates of public policies and programs that benefit children and young people.Organizing:  Action for Children stimulates local and state-level action by serving as a catalyst and source of information.Technology:  Action for Children uses the latest technology to keep lawmakers, community advocates and the general public fully up-to-date on issues affecting children.
  • For 29 years, Action for Children North Carolina has led the way in securing opportunities for all North Carolina’s children to flourish.Our vision is that North Carolina will be the best place to be and raise a child.Our mission is to advocate for child well-being by educating and engaging all people across the state to ensure that children are healthy, safe, well-educated and have every opportunity for success.Action for Children is the North Carolina partner for the KIDS COUNT project, a national and state-by-state initiative of the Annie E. Casey Foundation which seeks to enrich local, state and national discussionsby tracking quantitative indicators of child well-being.
  • Action for Children employs seven main strategies in pursuit of these goals, including: Applied Research & Data:  Action for Children continuously analyzes the current data and research on child well-being and presents it in user-friendly format for policymakers, advocates and the general public.Communications & Media Advocacy:  Action for Children works with the media to educate North Carolinians about how children in our state are faring and how we can improve their lives.Outreach:  Action for Children provides technical assistance to communities statewide on how to use data and research to improve conditions for children and young people.Convening/Facilitating:  Action for Children brings together partner organizations to pool knowledge and coordinate public policy approaches.Education:  Action for Children informs law makers and community advocates of public policies and programs that benefit children and young people.Organizing:  Action for Children stimulates local and state-level action by serving as a catalyst and source of information.Technology:  Action for Children uses the latest technology to keep lawmakers, community advocates and the general public fully up-to-date on issues affecting children.
  • Children are a product of the families, communities and support networks in which they are raised.
  • Although improvements have been made in several health outcomes, the economic downturn has created clear challenges that undermine the well-being of children and youth in North Carolina.
  • White 55 percent, down 13 percent from 63 in 2000Black 24 percentAmerican Indian 1 percentAsian 1 percentHispanic 14 percent up 133 percent since 2000 from 6 percent
  • White 55 percent, down 13 percent from 63 in 2000Black 24 percentAmerican Indian 1 percentAsian 1 percentHispanic 14 percent up 133 percent since 2000 from 6 percent
  • White 55 percent, down 13 percent from 63 in 2000Black 24 percentAmerican Indian 1 percentAsian 1 percentHispanic 14 percent up 133 percent since 2000 from 6 percent
  • Although improvements have been made in several health outcomes, the economic downturn has created clear challenges that undermine the well-being of children and youth in North Carolina.Since the start of the recession roughly 127,000 children in North Carolina have fallen into poverty.
  • 35 percent of children lived in families where no parent has full time, year round employment (2010). 25 percent of children in low-income families has at least one parent in the labor force.Children in low-income households by race:Asian and Pacific Islander 38%Black or African American 66%Hispanic or Latino 74%Non-Hispanic White 26%Total 40%
  • 1 IN 9 children in NC lives in extreme poverty259,000 children in 2010
  • Ratio of infant deaths to live births.Infant mortality is a particularly useful measure of health status because it both indicates currenthealth status of the population and predicts the health of the next generation.In NC the leading cause is congenital anomalies (i.e., congenital malformations,deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities). Can also include: complications of placenta, cord, andMembranes, accidents and SIDS. Leading cause of infant mortality among African Americans is low birthweight.
  • Ratio of infant deaths to live births.Infant mortality is a particularly useful measure of health status because it both indicates currenthealth status of the population and predicts the health of the next generation.In NC the leading cause is congenital anomalies (i.e., congenital malformations,deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities). Can also include: complications of placenta, cord, andMembranes, accidents and SIDS. Leading cause of infant mortality among African Americans is low birthweight.
  • 1Wake234,6132Mecklenburg233,3383Guilford114,4834Cumberland85,5415Forsyth85,401Total population1Mecklenburg919,6282Wake900,9933Guilford488,4064Forsyth350,6705Cumberland319,431
  • NC DATA$43,417 IN 2011$44, 772 in 20073% decline since the downturn
  • Current unemployment rate 8.3%Unemployment rate has grown 137 percent since the start of the economic downturn (3.5)Perspective current unemployment rate is 10.5% up 119 percent from 2007 (4.8%)Wake’s unemployment rates is about 21 percent lower than the state average.
  • In fact, Wake residents have higher degrees of educational attainment than average for the state2010 ACSNorth CarolinaNo HS 22 percentHS 31.6 percentSome college or associate’s 41.2Bachelor’s or higher 5.3WakeNo HS 14.7HS 18.2Some college or associates 53.3Bachelor’s degree or higher 13.9
  • 11.1 percent of children lack health insurance.
  • As unemployment remains above the national average and median household income has declined to pre-recession levels, the Earned Income Tax Credit is a vital tool to help working families make ends meet. National research released by the U.S. Census Bureau last year estimated that the EITC reduced the child poverty rate by more than 4 percentage point. (Supplemental Poverty Measure). 40% of NC children live in low-income households.
  • SafetyS77 Smoke alarm billEducationThe senate budget would add 2,000 unfunded slots to DCD, causing other cutsSchools face a $600 million hole cased by the loss of federal EduJob funds and discretionary reductionsBudgetThe proposed Senate budget increases total funding for state government by about one percent over the budget approved last year. The Governor's proposed budget increased funding by 4.9 percent, while the House proposed budget increased funding by 1.6 percent. Like the House budget, the Senate budget does not include the temporary sales tax increase that allowed the Governor to invest more heavily in public education.

2012_Redwoods Group Presentation 2012_Redwoods Group Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • NC KIDS COUNT CHILD WELL-BEING ACROSSTHE STATE AND IN WAKE COUNTY Laila A. Bell, MPA | laila@ncchild.org Director of Research and Data
  • TODAY’S AGENDA01 ABOUT ACTION FOR CHILDREN NORTH CAROLINA02 WHAT ACTION FOR CHILDREN DOES03 MEASURING CHILD WELL-BEING04 KEY CHILD WELL-BEING TRENDS IN NORTH CAROLINA05 A GLIMPSE AT CHILD WELL-BEING IN WAKE COUNTY06 POLICY STRATEGIES/LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
  • ABOUT01 ACTION FOR CHILDREN NORTH CAROLINA
  • Working to make NorthCarolina the best placeto BE and RAISE a child
  • WHAT02 ACTION FOR CHILDREN DOES
  • 02 OUR STRATEGIESAPPLIED RESEARCH AND DATACOMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA ADVOCACYOUTREACHCONVENING, ORGANIZING AND FACILITATINGPUBLIC EDUCATIONTECHNOLOGY
  • WHEN OUR CHILDREN DO WELL, WEALL DO WELL Childhood is a critical period in the developmental process that prepares children for future success in life.
  • Adverse experiences during childhoodcreate a lifetime of damage: • Reduced labor market participation and earnings • Lower academic achievement • Poor health • Greater risk of criminal justice system involvements
  • HOW03 ACTION FOR CHILDREN MEASURES CHILD WELL-BEING
  • A whole child approachto examining well-being.
  • All children are safe in All children have their homes, schools and economic security. communities. CHILD WELL-BEING All children are provided the opportunity andAll children are healthy. resources to succeed in their education
  • KEY04 TRENDS IN NORTH CAROLINA CHILD WELL- BEING
  • A NATIONAL STUDY RANKED NORTH CAROLINA 38TH IN OVERALL CHILD WELL-BEING2011 KIDS COUNT Data Book
  • After a period of improvement, NC’sstate rank increased in 2011 KIDS COUNT Data Book measures child well-being using 10 indicators Between 2003 and 2009 the state rank improved from a low 45 to 37 in the nation for overall child well-being This ranking does not capture the impact of recent budget cuts to children’s programs
  • 1 in 4 North Carolina residents is a childunder the age of 18 North Carolina’s child population is larger and more diverse than ever before Still, with the exception of Latino children, most groups experienced no change or a slight decline in child population over the past decade NC ranks 11th in the country in child population
  • The recession eroded economic security forfamilies across the state Children living in families that are economically secure have the best opportunity to thrive, succeed in school, find employment and become contributing members of society, Median household income fell from $44,772 in 2007 to $43,417 in 2010
  • 1 in 4 children in North Carolina live inpoverty Income below $23, 050 for a family of two adults and two children in 2012 25% increase since the start of the economic downturn NC ranks 38th in the country for the percent of children living in poverty
  • African American and Latino children in North Carolina are 1.6 times more likely to live in poverty than average. 43% 40% State Average 17% 14% Non-Hispanic White Black or African Asian and Pacific Hispanic or Latino American IslanderU.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey
  • Number of children living in householdsearning less than half the FPL is rising Income below $11,500 for a family of two adults and two children 38% increase since start of the economic downturn NC ranks 35th in the country for the percent of children living in extreme poverty
  • Once the highest in the nation, NorthCarolina’s infant mortality rate is improving A measure of the number of children who do not live to see their first birthday Improvement has been made, but there is still much work to be done NC ranks 45th in the country for infant mortality
  • The percent of low-birthweight births remainsa cause for concern A measure of the percentage of children born weighing less than 2,500 g or 5 lbs. 5 ozs. The leading cause of infant mortality among African American children in the state NC ranks a low 42nd in the country for low- birthweight births
  • 05 A GLIMPSE AT CHILD WELL- BEING IN WAKE COUNTY
  • 1 in 10 children in North Carolina live in WakeCounty Wake County is the second most populous county in the state 234,613 children reside in Wake County. If the Wake County child population were its own city, it would be the 8th largest city in the state of North Carolina
  • Household Income in Wake is at pre-recession levels The median household income represents the data point that splits the income distribution into two equal halves Median household income in Wake is $61,594
  • Unemployment in Wake County has more thandoubled since the start of the downturn A measure of the percentage of the civilian labor force that does not have a job, but is available and looking for work Wake has a lower unemployment rate than average, but experienced faster growth since the start of the economic downturn
  • More than 35,000 children in Wake live inpoverty Wake has the 3rd lowest child poverty rate in the state (15.2%) behind Union and Camden Counties
  • 8 in 10 Wake students graduate high school ontime with their peers A measure of the percentage of an incoming freshman class who graduate from high school within four years Wake has the highest cohort graduation rate in the state (82.6%) followed by Alleghany
  • 1 in 9 children in Wake are uninsured Healthy children have the best opportunity for success in school and in life All children need access to quality affordable health insurance, preventive health care, a medical home, and specialized services when necessary More than 27,000 children in Wake lack access to healthcare
  • 06 SUPPORTING IMPROVED WELL-BEING FOR NC CHILDREN
  • Support children in working families by strengthening the stateEarned Income Tax Credit. • The federal EITC lifts an estimated 3.3 million children out of poverty annually. • The state EITC pumped nearly $100 million back into local economies across the state.
  • Preserve public health insurance programs for North Carolinachildren. • More than 250,000 children across the state lack access to health insurance. • Despite looming cuts to Medicaid, it is imperative that public health coverage for children is not diminished.
  • THE CURRENT LEGISLATIVE SESSION HAS BEENA MIXED BAG FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH • Earned Income Tax Credit • Programs to support children’s health • Bills to increase child safety • Budget
  • Get involved in efforts to improve child well-being in your community • Contact your legislators • Stay informed • Connect with others
  • For more information visit Action for Children online: www.ncchild.org datacenter.kidscount.org/nc www.twitter.com/nckidscountwww.facebook.com/ActionforChildrenNorthCarolina