Research, process and practice
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Research, process and practice

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    Research, process and practice Research, process and practice Presentation Transcript

    • defining practice
    • ask yourself questions lots and continuously what do you like doing? why do you make work? what’s your work for? what do you want from your work? what do you get from your work? what is your work about? who is your audience? where does the work go?
    • building a reference point(s)
    • art history music dance connections writing general history geography/place contemporary practice science
    • materials and process’s understand what you work with become an expert
    • TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO ROLL CREASE FOLD STORE BEND SHORTEN TWIST TWINE DAPPLE CRUMPLE SHAVE TEAR CHIP SPLIT CUT SEVER DROP REMOVE SIMPLIFY DIFFER DISARRANGE SHAVE OPEN MIX SPLASH KNOT SPILL DROOP TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO OF OF OF OF OF OF OF TO TO TO TO TO TO FLOW SWIRL ROTATE SMEAR FLOOD FIRE IMPRESS INLAY LIFT CURVE SUPPORT HOOK SUSPEND SPREAD HANG TENSION GRAVITY ENTROPY NATURE GROUPING LAYERING FELTING COLLECT GRASP TIGHTEN BUNDLE HEAP GATHER TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO TO ARRANGE REPAIR DISCARD PAIR DISTRIBUTE SURFEIT SCATTER COMPLEMENT ENCLOSE SURROUND ENCIRCLE HIDE COVER WRAP DIG TIE BIND WEAVE JOIN MATCH LAMINATE BOND HINGE MARK EXPAND DILUTE LIGHT REVISE TO TO OF OF OF OF OF OF OF OF OF OF OF OF TO TO TO TO TO TO TO OF OF OF OF TO OF OF MODULATE DISTRILL WAVES ELECTROMAGNETIC INERTIA IONIZATION POLARIZATION REFRACTION SIMULTANEITY TIDES REFLECTION EQUILIBRIUM SYMMETRY FRICTION STRETCH BOUNCE ERASE SPRAY SYSTEMATIZE REFER FORCE MAPPING LOCATION CONTEXT TIME TALK PHOTOSYNTHESIS CARBONIZATION 67-68 TO CONTINUE
    • reflective practice
    • reflection in action - (while doing something) on action (after you have done it)
    • your making - contextual framework social personal political critical/ theoretical historical geographical institutional cultural
    • social context Making and seeing an image always takes place in a social context. The way it is seen and how it is seen are culturally constructed. Audience for work - who is included/excluded/implicated on the ways an image is produced, circulated and consumed
    • political context Specific political issue broad political issue gender - race - ethnicity - sexual orientation - class - disability - religion
    • personal context Biography - narrative of the self particular issues - memories What motivates/ drives you? Your particular skills as an artist/ designer/writer/photographer What strategies do you use when the work is not going well? How do you relate to the forces that in part condition what you know and in which you make things?
    • critical/theoretical context Does your work relate to particular critical debates about contemporary art and design practices? Is your work informed by/engaging with/contesting particular theoretical frameworks/issues?
    • historical context Understand how/whether your practice relates to a tradition, with a history How knowledge relates to periods in time.
    • geographical context Local, regional, national, international, global. Where do you make your work? Do you make your work in relation to a particular place? studio home church city rural cyberspace
    • institutional context MA Course - school of design Your educational background/experience Your professional background/experience Your family background/experience
    • cultural context In it’s broadest sense - ‘a whole way of life’ - this relates to all the other categories. More specifically, what works of artists, designers, writers, filmmakers, photographers, musicians are important to you and your work - why?
    • mapping your practice Any other contexts worth considering? Importance Overlapping change - evolution of practice
    • why develop context? vacuum learning position moving forward growing aspiration
    • Practical – moving forward – the doing photo archive databases bibliography studio work/portfolio practice-based research proposal reflective journal concept maps storage by colour coding - analysis - discussion - background - methodology - projects - review
    • Practical – moving forward – the doing Keep keywords in mind - spectacles and sieves – helps focus and select. Colour code to identify different types of information. Each article/book/moment – interrogate consistently – What? Why? Who? Where? How? When? It makes comparison easier. Note quality of information – clarity, accuracy, precision, brevity, depth, relevance, rigour, consistency, reason, effective analysis, synthesis.
    • The role/place of documentation writing diary reflective journal analysing D D reading making questioning D tape recording photographing questionnaire analysing analysing making notes writing reviews
    • making-thinking define research ideation prototype choose implement learn ideation (idea generation) – is the process of creating new ideas.
    • 3 - How? Practice based methodology criteria formal framework review of context structure / timescale methods external rational generation of Data issue problem challenge raised in practice 2 - why 4 - so what? play sieves critical analysis discussion /conclusions 1 - what is known? interpretations / meanings
    • stage 1 • finding the need • begin to wonder – what if... • could this be better – personal dissatisfaction • recognising gaps – professional stimulus • raising questions • strengths and weaknesses
    • stage 2 • the identification of a ‘hunch’ – leading to an identifiable question • so what....the wider significance - why is your research needed? • how are you going to develop an appropriate methodology? gathering, generating relevant • what do you hope to gain by undertaking research?
    • stage 3 • Initial search for information that supports your hunch • Initial feedback – peers
    • stage 4 • No apparent external rationale – could the work be too indulgent/idiosyncratic for a research project
    • stage 5 • Refocusing the initial proposal based on your discoveries so far
    • stage 6 • Mapping the terrain • Surveying the context – to increase understanding • Selecting what is relevant – evaluating critically • Identifying gaps
    • Stage 7 • Identifying a question • Using this to develop a plan • Aim, objectives, rationale, methodology, projected outcomes and outputs • Ethics?
    • stage 8 • • • • • • So far Planned the journey Mapped the terrain Located your position Now – crossing the terrain Modes of transport – methodology and methods
    • stage 9 • Interpreting the map • Evaluate – what is valuable, relevant, significant?
    • stage 10 • Conclusion - so what? • Critical evaluation – making visible • Identification of future research
    • to conclude - research should Be required and relevant – clear – an external, professional and personal rationale – a need Be intentional – envisioned, proposed, prepared for, strategic, planned, focused Be disciplined – rigorous, critical, ordered – it is a structured investigation Develop a research approach – initiation, context, methods, making findings visible Be revelatory – contributing new /alternative perspectives and insights Be public – open to public and future use