Characteristics Of VGI Stakeholders

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The general characteristics of ‘Volunteered Geographic Information’ (VGI) stakeholders in terms of their perceived utility of VGI. The characteristics presented here are selected attributes from a …

The general characteristics of ‘Volunteered Geographic Information’ (VGI) stakeholders in terms of their perceived utility of VGI. The characteristics presented here are selected attributes from a much wider exploratory study into the VGI user terrain and stakeholder value perceptions of VGI.

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  • http://www.usergenerateddesign.co.uk Christopher J. Parker

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  • 1. CHARACTERISTICS OF VGI STAKEHOLDERS Christopher J. Parker www.UserGeneratedDesign.co.uk
  • 2. OUTLINE
    • Introduction
    • Methodology
    • Characteristics of Stakeholders
    • Conclusion
    • Future Research
  • 3. 1 INTRODUCTION
      • Need to understand Stakeholders to understand usability (Gould, Lewis 1985, ISO 1998, Tulloch 2008)
        • Who they are
        • How do they interact
        • What are their motivations
        • User requirements
    • To better understand what VGI actually is (Elwood 2008, Crampton 2008, Livingstone 1992)
  • 4. 2 METHODOLOGY
    • 15 respondents sourced from all stakeholder categories
    • Semi structured interviews
    • In depth analysis with NVivo 8
      • Analysed transcripts for 208 salient themes
      • Compared stakeholder groups against one another
      • Creation of a Rich Picture from results
  • 5. 2 DIFFERENT FORMS OF STAKEHOLDER (COOTE, RACKHAM 2008)
    • Consumers
      • “ A Person who make a decision to use a product or service for personal use”
    • Special Interest Mapping Groups
      • “ Individuals who come together to collaboratively achieve some shared mapping goal”
    • Local Communities
      • “ Local people who have a common desire to protect and improve their local area”
    • Professionals
      • “ Stakeholders who are employed by organisations that use geographic data to perform their business activities, whether to analyse, report, navigate or otherwise maintain systems.”
  • 6. 3 Usability Profiles:
      • Need to understand Stakeholders to understand usability (Gould, Lewis 1985, ISO 1998, Tulloch 2008)
  • 7. Usability Profiles: CONSUMERS
    • Desire ‘completeness’
    • Chose product to facilitate activities
    • Utilise end products of Traditional and Neogeographic projects
    • Apply personal requirements to all products
    • All have unique requirements and preferences
  • 8. Usability Profiles: S PECIAL INTEREST MAPPING GROUPS
    • Enjoy freedom with data
    • Producing something unique to their product
    • ‘ communist’ organisation in all members have the same voice
    • Work towards a greater goal AND own goals in projects
    • Like benefiting others
    • Strong bias towards their map product.
  • 9. Usability Profiles: COMMUNITIES
    • Enjoy freedom
    • Utilise their projects map
    • Community focused
    • Co-operate any agencies to achieve their goals
    • No express product development for externals
  • 10. Usability Profiles: PROFESSIONALS
    • Need data sets to be ‘complete’ across their entire work area.
    • Motivation of using data is increasing business position
    • Either VGI focused or PGI focused
    • Both groups affected by external influences
    • VGI offers a ‘mind of the user’
  • 11. 4 CONCLUSION
    • There are salient differences between stakeholder groups' perceptions
    • VGI has a great potential to add value when it fills holes in ‘proprietary maps’
    • People have an emotional connection with helping others through contribution (e.g. Haiti Map) and sharing experiences
    • Important aspects for stakeholder usability extends beyond ‘does it do X and Y’ and into ‘human factors’
  • 12. 5 FUTURE RESEARCH
    • 2 further studies in my PhD focusing on the consumer use of VGI
      • Differences between perceptions of VGI and PGI as concepts
      • What is the added value to ‘professional generated information’ by including VGI?
      • Further illustrate the strengths and weakness in VGI and PGI
  • 13. www.UserGeneratedDesign.co.uk
  • 14. REFERENCES
    • COOTE, A. and RACKHAM, L., 2008. Neogeography Data Quality - is it an issue? AGI Geocommunity '08, 23-25 September 2008 2008, Association for Geographic Information (AGI).
    • CRAMPTON, J.W., 2008. Cartography: maps 2.0. Progress in human geography, 33 (1), 91-100.
    • ELWOOD, S., 2008. Geographic Information Science: new geovisualisation technologies emerging questions and linkages with GIScience research. Progress in human geography, 33 (2), 256-263.
    • GOULD, J.D. and LEWIS, C., 1985. Designing for usability: key principles and what designers think. Communications of the ACM, 28 (3), 300-311.
    • ISO, 1998. ISO 9241-11:1998. Ergonomic requirements for offce work with visual display terminals (VDT)s - Part 11 Guidence on usability. ISO edn. ISO.
    • LIVINGSTONE, D.N., 1992. In defence of situated messiness: geographical knowledge and the history of science. GeoJournal, 26 (2), 228-229.
    • TULLOCH, D.L., 2008. Is VGI participation? From vernal pools to video games. GeoJournal, 72 , 161-171.