Rigor and Talk Checklist

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A checklist to help teachers consider the level of rigor in their classroom discussions

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Rigor and Talk Checklist

  1. 1. Rigor and TalkStudents and Dispositions  Students are curious shown by comments such as “tell me more” and “show me how” and “What if we did this…”  Students are reflective shown by comments such as “to me, this means” and “as I understand what you’re saying” and “after thinking about this some more” and “when I reconsider…”  Students tolerate ambiguity, letting multiple ideas or positions exist side by side while evidence is being presented or sorted  Students are patient, giving ideas and others a chance to grow  Students are tentative meaning they offer rather than assert, are open- minded rather than narrow-minded, are more interested in questions that are to explored rather than questions that are to be answeredStudents and Texts  Students use texts to expand, deepen, challenge, and clarify their own knowledge  Students use evidence from one or more texts to back up claims  Students make connections within a text to clarify, extend, or question  Students make connections across texts to clarify, extend, or question  Students refer to what was learned in previously read textsStudents and Ideas  Students change their minds about ideas from time to time and offer reason  Students hypothesize  Students are able to consider alternative positions and are willing to ask “What if?”  Students encourage others to “tell me more” or “give me an example” to keep conversations on alternative ideas going  Students identify topics that they need to know more about before reaching conclusionsStudents and Reasoning and Evidence  Students provide examples and reasons for their statements/opinions  Students present information in some sort of logical order—causes and effects, sequential, lists of reasons or examples  Students avoid “just because” statements  Students recognize faulty assumptions and helpfully encourage each other to examine those assumptions  Students recognize persuasive techniques  Students question the author’s motives when appropriate to do so By Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst, from Notice and Note: Strategies that Encourage Close Reading, Heinemann, 2012 (in press)

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