Literate Environment Analysis
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Literate Environment Analysis

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Exploring different literacy perspectives and demonstrating how they have been incorporated into my classroom.

Exploring different literacy perspectives and demonstrating how they have been incorporated into my classroom.

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  • 1. Literate EnvironmentAnalysis Presentation Kathryn Wool Walden University
  • 2. Getting to Know Your StudentsOn average, a student is in my classroomfor thirty five hours a week. It is imperativethat teachers are able to learn as muchabout each student not only their personalinterests but how each student learns. Ifeach teacher takes the time to do this thenthey will be better serving the educationalneeds of their students.
  • 3. Getting to Know Your StudentsGetting to know the students of my classroom is one ofmy first priorities. You can gain information about yourstudents through various assessments. A new way that Ilearned how to find out more about my students wasthrough “me stew” (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).The students bring in three items that are important tothem and tell you about how these three items “makethem”. In Preschool, the recipe part is a little advancedbut the act of the student choosing three items andbringing them in will demonstrate interests which theteacher can relate to.
  • 4. Getting to Know Your StudentsBy further ingraining the importance of getting to knowmy students through my current course, I can selecttexts or choose activities that will capture my studentsattention. Knowing how a student learns whether it behands-on or visually enables me to enhance the learningenvironment within my classroom to further educate mystudents. One assessment that I often use is the GarfieldReading Attitude Survey. This assessment allows me tounderstand my student’s feelings towards reading andenables me to help my students write a LiteracyAutobiography of good events.
  • 5. Selecting Texts The use of a tool such as a Literacy Matrix (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b) allows a teacher to examine a text based on the number of pictures or words on each page, whether the text is fictional or informational, and on some matrices how difficult the text is.• Research (Cite at least one learning resource from this course that supports this practice.)
  • 6. Selecting TextsWhile studying how to select texts, I found that theintroduction of informative text in the early literacy yearsis crucial in order to build background knowledge ontopics that students will learn more in-depth about asthey get older. The benefit of reading more informativetexts will help students avoid or recover from whatexperts refer to as “the fourth grade slump” (LaureateEducation, Inc., 2010c). After learning this information, Ihave begun trying to incorporate at least one informativetext for each unit to help build the background knowledgeof my students. Another way that I have found is toreview still pictures or short documentaries that focus onour theme.
  • 7. Selecting TextsOnly one in four students who enter “the fourthgrade slump” typically close the gap. Thusleaving 75% of students who are having difficultyto fail. Since I am usually one of the firstteachers that my students have, I believe it is myresponsible to introduce informative text and togive a positive connotation to reading. My hopeis that when my students look back on theirLiteracy Autobiographies, they remember me assomeone who encouraged them, ignited a desireto read and they knew cared and believed inthem.
  • 8. PerspectivesThere are three perspectives that Iexamined throughout this course: interactive, critical and response
  • 9. Literacy Lesson: Interactive PerspectiveThe interactive perspective is teachingstudents how to read and to be strategicprocessors and thinkers. Through mycurrent course, I have learned newstrategies on ways to instruct reading andhow to teach students to read.
  • 10. Instructive PerspectiveA new tool that I have learned was the utilizationof word ladders (Tompkins, 2011). In myclassroom, I used playdoh and letter cookiecutters for the students to manipulate in order tocreate words. I have seen the benefit of usinghands-on activities with my students and theyreally enjoyed word ladders. This is an activitythat can eventually be extended to letter tiles forstudents to stack letters on top of each other tocreate new words.
  • 11. Critical and Response Perspectives Critical Perspective teaches students how to examine texts critically. The students look at who wrote the text, what was the author’s perspective, and how the author’s background has affected their text. Response Perspective allows children the opportunity to experience and respond to the text. There are multiple ways that a student can respond to text; whether it be artistically or through writing.
  • 12. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response PerspectivesBased on what I have learned during this course, Ihave found that I need to incorporate different waysfor my students to respond to a text. At this point, I donot ask for written responses since my students arestill learning how to write; however, I believe thatexpressing their responses through drama or drawinga picture would be a better indicator of whether or notthey understood the text. I will continue to look forother ways my students can express themselves inage-appropriate ways that are more than just oralresponses.
  • 13. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response PerspectivesCritical Perspective: By creating readers who are critical of what they read, they begin to look for validity. This is a great characteristic for students to have especially when they get older and begin using internet sources. Building background knowledge and teaching our students to be critical about text will allow our students to determine whether or not a text is a valid source (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010d).
  • 14. Response Perspective: The goal for our students is that a text should effect them in some way. A great metaphor that I learned about was the imagining that a student and text were two balls of clays and that when they collided with each other, they left dents. These dents were an indication that a reaction had occurred (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010e).
  • 15. References• Laureate Education, Inc. (2010a). Getting to Know Your Students. [Motion Picture]. In C. Arnold (Producer), The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Los Angeles, Laureate Education, Inc.• Laureate Education, Inc. (2010b). Analyzing and Selecting Texts. [Motion Picture]. In C. Arnold (Producer), The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Los Angeles, Laureate Education, Inc.• Laureate Education, Inc. (2010c). Informational Text in Early Years. [Motion Picture]. In C. Arnold (Producer), The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Los Angeles, Laureate Education, Inc.• Laureate Education, Inc. (2010d). Critical Perspective. [Motion Picture]. In C. Arnold (Producer), The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Los Angeles, Laureate Education, Inc.• Laureate Education, Inc. (2010e). Response Perspective. [Motion Picture]. In C. Arnold (Producer), The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Los Angeles, Laureate Education, Inc.• Tompkins, G.E. (2011) Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach. Allyn & Bacon: Boston, MA.