Workforcecamp: An Introduction to Policy, Strategy, Implementation

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CSW presentation to inaugural WorkforceCamp 09, April 27-28, 2009, San Diego, CA. Overview, Policy, Theory of Change, Common Interventions, Simulation.

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Workforcecamp: An Introduction to Policy, Strategy, Implementation

  1. 1. WorkforceCamp: An Introduction to Workforce Policy, Strategy and Implementation
  2. 2.   Welcome & Overview of WorkforceCamp   For questions   Speak up   Index cards   Twitter backchannel #wfcamp09   Folderscontents on wiki http://workforcecamp.wikispaces.com/
  3. 3.   Pair up   Introduce yourselves to each other   Introduce your partner to the group – name, affiliation & location, three “tags”
  4. 4. UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT: BOB JONES, MARION PINES
  5. 5. BIG PICTURE ISSUES: POLICY & STRATEGY
  6. 6. Did you know (3.0) Laid off    
  7. 7. Thinking about our nation, your state or your community: What kept you awake last   night? Last year?   What is emerging that will keep you awake in the future?
  8. 8. UNPRECEDENTED? OR “HERE WE GO AGAIN”?
  9. 9.   Strategy& Purpose: “what” & “why”, not “how”   “Big Deal” Issues   Seeks to change behavior:   Individuals   Companies   What we do communally through government and in our communities
  10. 10.   Issues about:   Employment   Skills and knowledge of workers   Worker transitions   Worker/learner supports   Territory spans many silos:   Workforce boards   Community Colleges and other post-secondary   Adult education/basic skills development   Economic development   Human services skills & employment
  11. 11.   Multiple levels:   Federal   State   Regional/local
  12. 12. Formal Levers include: Informal Levers include:     Legislation Building guiding coalitions       Regulation   Advocacy   Directives   Engaging people in the issue   Organizational structures   Incentives   Funding   Performance requirements   Incentives
  13. 13. POLICY = “WHAT” & “WHY” PROGRAM = “HOW” Aimed at broader change Created to solve a specific     problem More readily integrative   Tend to form silos, create turf Systemic, lasting change;     Focus on delivery of service/ often affects multiple   programs solution to specific
  14. 14. BREAK (10 MINS)
  15. 15. Agric ultur Polic al y Defense
Policy
 Trade y th Polic 
Polic Heal y

  16. 16. Logic Model & Theory of   Change   Adaptive Strategy & Social Impact
  17. 17. Mission:
Prosperity
(good
jobs,
 thriving
communi3es)
 Strategy:
Increase
community
 1.  Purpose
 (regional)

agility
and
resilience
 Facilitate
healthy
community
networks
 focused
on
innova3on
and
transi3on
 (workers,
firms
communi3es)
 2.
Environment
 “Wicked
problem”
 
spaces
in
communi3es
 3.
Outcomes
 Partners
 5.
Learn
 • Alignment
(priori3es,
strategies,

 • Evalua3on
 resources,
investments)
 • Documenta3on
 • More
collabora3ve
ac3vity
across
 • Retrospec3ve
 diverse
partnerships
 • Feedback
loop
 Public
 • Survey
 • Measurable
changes
in
awareness,

 opinion,
percep3on,
aOtudes
 • Self‐organized
individuals
help

 themselves
and
each
other
 • More
meaningful
engagement
 4.
Ac9ons
 • Partnership
building:
Asset/resource

 mapping,
social
networking,

convening
 Impact
 • Increased
agility,
resilience
 • Informa3on:
data
gathering,
environmental
scan
 • Change
in
ways
of
doing
business
 • Strategy:
Ini3a3ve
development
&
 implementa3on

 • Increased
confidence
in
community
 • Engagement:
facilita3on,
events,
communica3on,
 • Improved
eco‐system
awareness
 promo3on
 • Increase
in
peer‐to‐peer
learning,
 bartering/brokering
 *
Based
on
Geoff
Mulgan’s
Adap3ve
Strategy
Model
ar3culated
in
The
Art
of
Public
Strategy
(Oxford
University
Press,
2009).

  18. 18. Get into groups of 5-6     Select a “problem” from environmental scan   Develop a modified theory of change Define and give context   to problem (cause)   Identify what action(s) you will take to address it   Define outcome(s)   Report back
  19. 19. Exploration & Simulation
  20. 20. Sector Partnerships: Regional public-private   workforce partnerships in critical industries Career Pathways: How people advance from one job   to another based on skills and experience Entrepreneurship: How we help people make jobs   (not just find them) Community engagement: How we influence attitudes   and behaviors in firms, communities, and among people
  21. 21. Private State Funders Workforce Intermediary Education Work Workers and Support Businesses & Industry Training Providers Associations Providers Labor, Economic Developers
  22. 22. Convened by Richmond Works Strong career pathway focus.     (Local Workforce Investment Board) Targets at-risk youth in Richmond, CA.   Unprecedented level of Since its launch in April 2007, the     collaboration with employers, Adult partnership has placed 90% of its 130 Education, public and private graduates in green construction jobs training programs, unions, city paying $18+/hour. economic development, and the city housing authority. Richmond Works staff worked   closely with employers to understand skills needs across positions in the construction and solar installation sector. Public private partners provide in-   kind and financial support.
  23. 23. Involves identifying a set of occupations within an industry,   the relevant skills needed for each, and the steps (including coursework, certificates, degrees) needed to obtain employment and advance in each. Career “lattices” or “crosswalks” are a related concept,   indicating sets of skills that are transferrable across industries or related sub-sectors. Often at the center of a sector partnership’s activities, if   employers in the partnership identify this is as a missing piece to filling their workforce gaps. Many community colleges use employer or industry advisory   boards to help them create career pathway curriculum in target industries.
  24. 24. Entre- & Jobs & intra- Opportunity preneurs High Lifestyle Community growth Innovation businesses value firms
  25. 25. A region with mixed urban, suburban and rural areas, maybe 50 square miles;   roughly a population of 150,000 people. Pockets of poverty, mostly solid working class neighborhoods, increasingly diverse, but aging population. The area encompasses two local workforce areas, 3 community colleges, a   University, a handful of Chambers of Commerce, a few school districts; Regional economy made up traditionally of small- to mid-size manufacturing but   that sector has been shrinking; Relatively strong organized Labor presence;   High proportion of private construction contractors with little to no work in the   down economy, including insulation workers, welders, pipefitters, electricians, roofers and builders; The region also is home to a large software company advertising to the public   about recent sustainable business practice efforts. Data shows emerging growth in “green manufacturers” – e.g. 2 solar panel   manufacturers; a wind turbine manufacturer; a recycled carpet company; a few window supply companies trying to shift to energy efficient products; One of the solar manufacturers approached a local workforce board with this   question: “My company employers 12 people, but to grow quickly I need a dozen more entry- to mid-level workers who know their way around the basic technology that I use to design and produce my specialized solar panels. What can you do?”
  26. 26. Imagine this is an emerging opportunity in your region. A convener has been   given a small ($20K) grant to start a sector partnership in green manufacturing. You are all invited to be members of this new sector partnership. You will   play different roles – these are described on your role cards. One of you (in each group) has been assigned the role of “convener” or   “intermediary.” It’s your job to get this group talking coherently about relevant workforce needs, and possible joint efforts for sector growth. Get ready to facilitate. Take 2 minutes to get into your role – really think about the interests and   motivations of that person. Become that person. Get into it!
  27. 27. YOUR TASKS FOR THE NEXT 45 MINUTES CONSIDER THESE QUESTIONS: What is potentially different about this Start by introducing yourselves   partnership from existing workforce or training efforts? in your “role.” Then get to: How will you identify common, persistent   workforce challenges across employers 1.  Why we’re all here today; in this sector? What types of activities do you envision 2.  Some identification of   meeting the workforce needs of common needs; employers at the table? How will you know it is meeting their   3.  At least one idea for needs? How will this partnership engage additional employers? common action. What funding streams might be tapped   to support convening the partnership and mid- to long-term activities of the partnership? Who is not at the table that should be?  
  28. 28. Did you get distracted by   trying to define “green jobs”? What did “conveners” notice   about the process? What were the biggest   barriers to consensus? What ideas emerged?   What would be next for this   partnership?
  29. 29. Flickr friends: Video friends:     blumpy Dariopimentel (& Karl     Fisch & Co)   Tirajisu   reb5574   krossbow   demi-brooke   voxefx   Mike Schinkel   olikristinn   newzgirl   bettybraun

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