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Teaching Gamification
 

Teaching Gamification

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Presentation to the Gamification Summit, San Francisco, CA, April 18, 2013

Presentation to the Gamification Summit, San Francisco, CA, April 18, 2013

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    Teaching Gamification Teaching Gamification Presentation Transcript

    • Professor Kevin WerbachDept. of Legal Studies & Business EthicsWharton School, Univ. of Pennsylvaniawerbach@wharton.upenn.eduTwitter: @kwerbGamification Summit, April 2013
    • •  132 years old•  11 academic departments•  20 research centers•  240 faculty•  $900 million endowment•  92,000 alumni
    • •  132 years old•  11 academic departments•  20 research centers•  240 faculty•  $900 million endowment•  92,000 alumni•  43 years old•  2 sessions of 1 course•  1 webcam•  140,000 students
    • https://www.coursera.org/course/gamification
    • Stats from Session 1 (Fall 2012)•  81,600 registrations–  2/3 non-U.S.; over 150 countries represented–  77% of participants not in school/university•  Massive engagement–  >2,200,000 video views–  19,513 forum posts–  187,028 peer assessments,by 13,088 students–  Student-formed Facebookgroup: 3,468 members–  Hashtag #gamification12:>2,700 tweets
    • Pedagogical Challenges•  Novelty of MOOCs•  Diverse global students•  Asynchronous and one-way•  Assessing creative work
    • Pedagogical Challenges•  Novelty of MOOCs•  Diverse global students•  Asynchronous and one-way•  Assessing creative work•  No prior courses on the subject•  WTF is gamification, anyway?
    • Course Outline•  Week 1: Intro to games and gamification•  Week 2: Anatomy of games•  Week 3: Psychology•  Week 4: Design concepts•  Week 5: Enterprise and social impact applications•  Week 6: Challenges, critiques, and extensions
    • ENGAGEMENT
    • NoStinkin’Badges!
    • Traditional Course Design1   2   3   4   5   6   7  UnitsMidterm Final
    • OnboardingClimbingRestRestBossFightClimbingClimbingThe Player JourneyScaffoldingLevelUp
    • Gamification Course DesignOnboard Climb Climb Climb RestBossFightRestQuizQuizFinalMajorProjectQuiz+ProjectQuiz+Project
    • Student Motivation TypesSource: Richard Bartle
    • PuzzlesNotice anydifferences?
    • %  of  Registra4on  %  of  Starters  %  of  Submi:ers  %  of  Writers  0%  10%  20%  30%  40%  50%  60%  70%  80%  90%  100%  61%31%23%  19%  16%  15%  13%  11%   13%52%38%32%26%25%22%18% 21%74%61%50%48%42%35% 40%84%70%80%%  of  Registra4on  %  of  Starters  %  of  Submi:ers  %  of  Writers  ≈81,600registered8,280received certificate2x-4x Typical Completion Rate
    • MOTIVATIONLEARNING
    • Behavior GamesMarketing and economics Game design and psychologyIncentives ExperiencesSatisfying needs FunGame elements (inductive) Game thinking (deductive)Status MeaningPBLs PuzzlesRewards ProgressionMaking users do things Making players awesomeWould the Real Gamification Stand Up?
    • Behavior GamesLifelong learning online Lifelong learning onlineNew pedagogy New pedagogyPersonalization PersonalizationEmpowering active learning Empowering active learningFeedback FeedbackCommon Ground
    • Prof. Kevin Werbachwerbach@wharton.upenn.eduTwitter: @kwerbthank you!COURSEhttp://wdp.wharton.upenn.edu/books/for-the-win/BOOKhttps://www.coursera.org/course/gamification