Technetium (Zach Ewing)

539 views
389 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
539
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Technetium (Zach Ewing)

  1. 1. Technetium – Tc The lone element on the Periodic Table. [98] 43
  2. 2. History • The Element Technetium is defined as... “A radioactive metal, the first synthetically produced element, used as a tracer and to inhibit corrosion in steel.”1 • The name is derived from the Greek ‘tekhnetos’, meaning artificial.1 • It was discovered by Emilio Segre and Carlo Perrier in 1937 in Italy.1
  3. 3. Properties • Technetium’s Melting point is a very toast 2,200°C (2,473.15K, or 3,992°F)1 • Its Boiling Point is 4,877°C (5150.15K, or 8811°F)1 • Its normally a solid at room temperature (No Way!!!!!)1 • Its color is silver.2
  4. 4. Properties Cont’d….. • The density, at 20°C, is 11.5 g/cm3 1 • In order to use it with steel, you must melt the technetium and meld it with steel to make rust-proof steel that’s radioactive.1 • Major Isotopes of Technetium are Tc-97, 98, 99, and 99m. ( “m” means metastable)3. • Tc- 97, 98, & 99 are long living isotopes, dangerous to health. Tc-99m is used as a tracer in medicine.3
  5. 5. Availability • Technetium is not commonly found on earth. Some scientists claim that there are very little amounts of it in the crust. • Technetium is found in some “red giant” stars. (scientists viewed and analyzed the emission spectrum and found a series matching Technetium’s) • Most Technetium is created in a nuclear reactor. • In 1960, it was priced at $2,800 per gram, no it is $60 a gram to O.R.N.L permit holders.4 • O.R.N.L stands for Oak ridge National Laboratory.
  6. 6. Uses • Can be made into an alloy with steel to prevent corrosion of steel, but this makes the steel radioactive. • Is also used as a tracer in medicine. It deposits in the brain, liver, kidneys, spleen, and bones.
  7. 7. Resources 1. http://www.facts-about.org.uk/science- element-technetium.htm 2. http://www.rsc.org/chemsoc/visualelements/pa ges/technetium.html 3. http://www.ead.anl.gov/pub/doc/technetium.p df 4. http://www.radiochemistry.org/periodictable/el ements/43.html 5. http://www.ornl.gov/info/ornlreview/rev25- 2/net1625.html

×