Downtown Plan for Westminster, CA                 California State Polytechnic University Pomona                         C...
AcknowledgementsWe would like to express gratitude toward the following individuals from the City ofWestminster for taking...
CONTENTS1. Vision2. Background  2.1. Demographics to be Served  2.2. Boundaries of Sigler Village3. Sigler Park  3.1. Curr...
CHAPTER ONE  VISION              4
Imagine a place where you can let your dog play freely, have dinner at yourfavorite restaurant, and watch a movie under th...
6    Figure 1.1: Overview map of Sigler Village
CHAPTERCHAPTER TWOBACKGROUND              7
2.1. Demographics to be Served       Westminster thrives with its rich culture and history that is unmatched inOrange Coun...
residential homes will easily be able to access the park and all other services in thedowntown.Eastern boundary: Hoover St...
CHAPTER THREE SIGLER PARK                10
3.1. Current Features        In Sigler Village, parks are not just for kids! Sigler Park is currently a destinationfor com...
Figure 3.2 (left): Children’s playground; Figure 3.3 (right): Splash Pad3.2. Current Events & Opportunities       Sigler P...
Figure 3.4: New layout of Sigler ParkEntryway        A grand entryway will be erected on the north side of the park, facin...
Figure 3.6: Option #2 for Sigler Park entrywayRestrooms        Since the park is being expanded, wewant to add new men’s a...
Figure 3.8: Vietnamese garden at Sigler ParkDog park         A dog park will be a well-needed feature for the many furry f...
can become a butterfly or pirate, as they get their faces painted by local artists.Everyone will get to celebrate creativi...
CHAPTER FOUR  LAND USE               17
4.1. Current Land Use4.1.       The existing area consists of an assorted mix of land uses, poorly-maintainedbuildings, an...
4.2. ENVISIONED LAND USE       Sigler Village will be a neighborhood in which uses and activities flow effortlesslywith ea...
CHAPTER FIVEIDENTITY ELEMENTS                    20
Sigler Village will be a destination for people near and far. We want the image ofSigler Park to stay in the minds of the ...
Figure 5.4 (left): Black Locust tree; Figure 5.5 (right): Staghorn Sumac treeThese trees will enhance the downtown’s aesth...
Sidewalks       Sidewalks in Sigler Village will contrast the strong colors used for the buildings.To create unity within ...
Figure5.8: Extending sign and awning sign                 Figure 5.9: Sign on building and hanging sign• Gateway sign(s): ...
Figure 5.10: Sigler Village gateway signBuilding Design       Upon entering Sigler Village, one will not be able to help b...
Figure 5.9 (top left): Color palette for commercial buildings; Figure 5.8 (top right): Spanish style               archite...
Streetscape   • Benches: Enhancing the pedestrian      experience even further, the addition      of benches placed throug...
• Light posts: Metal, with two lantern-style   hanging lights. Found nowhere else in the   city, these lights will easily ...
• Public Space: A small landscaped area will be created on Westminster Boulevard       that will allow for passersby to si...
CHAPTER SIXCIRCULATION              30
One of the main goals for Sigler Village is to improve accessibility within thedowntown area. Anticipating the popularity ...
structures in different areas of the downtown will give visitors the choice of parking  near Sigler Park or parking closer...
Figure 6.2 (left): A typical                                                         crosswalk at Sigler Village;         ...
Alleys   While enjoying the downtown, pedestrians like to have a place where they canwalk freely without having to worry a...
CHAPTER SEVENIMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIESIMPLEMENTATION     ME                            35
7.1. Incentives for HomeownersMulti-family: Westminster Multi-Family Block Grant Program       The Multi-Family Block Gran...
Funding   • Funding would be available through various City, State and Federal grant       programs.Eligible Apartment Com...
The following images show what apartment buildings could look like once the propertyowners take advantage of this new ince...
Single-family: Home Enhancement Loan Program (HELP)       For single-family homes, the city of Westminster has a special p...
With this program, the city attaches a lean on a property against the equity youhave in your home. The city then gives you...
Figure 7.6: A typical two-story house in Sigler Village areaFigure 7.7: Possible renovation of home in Figure 7.6         ...
7.2 Incentives for Business Owners7.2Federal New Markets Tax Credit Program       The New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Progra...
CHAPTER EIGHT CONCLUSION                43
As the world’s communities become denser, “greener,” and more walkable,other cities can look to Sigler Village as a prime ...
APPENDIAPPENDICES             45
A.1. Cities ReferencedCity                       Articles/References City of Westminster, CA   Zoning Code update intinal ...
A.2. Housing StylesRanch:The predominant style for housing in the area is the single story Ranch style. The roofs in thear...
A.3. Churches     Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church         Good Shepard Utd. Methodist Church             14072 Olive Str...
Journey Evangelical Church     Westminster Lutheran Church    14614 Magnolia Ave.             13841 Milton Ave      Westmi...
EventsA.4. EventsFarmers’ MarketCertified Farmers’ Market sponsored by Orange County Farm Bureau(714) 573-0374Approx.: 20 ...
A.5. City History  •   The area of Westminster was originally founded as a colony in 1870, but there      have been many p...
A.6. City DemographicsHOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES: In 2006-2008 there were 27,000 households inWestminster city. The average h...
occupations, 27 percent; Service occupations, 20 percent; Production, transportation,and material moving occupations, 18 p...
OCCUPIED HOUSING UNIT CHARACTERISTICS: In 2006-2008, Westminster city had27,000 occupied housing units - 15,000 (57 percen...
A.7. Businesses Within the AreaHome Depot                     USPSKohl’s dept. store             The UPS storeArco gas sta...
A.8. Figure CitationsFigure 2.1: Satellite photo of district. Source: http://images.google.comFigure 3.2: Sigler Park play...
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Sigler village

  1. 1. Downtown Plan for Westminster, CA California State Polytechnic University Pomona College of Environmental Design By: Elaine Dulay -Steve Garcia -Danica Garva -Daniel Guerra -Jacob HuberMark Jimmerson -Kevin Kohan -Krystal Marquez -Narineh Shahinian -TJ Suwanswetr Instructor: Richard Zimmer
  2. 2. AcknowledgementsWe would like to express gratitude toward the following individuals from the City ofWestminster for taking the time to review our downtown plan and providing us withconstructive feedback. • Don Lamm, City Manager • Doug McIsaac, Community Development Director • Art Bashmakian AICP, Planning Manager • Chet Simmons, Economic Development • Steve Ratkay AICP, Associate Planner 2
  3. 3. CONTENTS1. Vision2. Background 2.1. Demographics to be Served 2.2. Boundaries of Sigler Village3. Sigler Park 3.1. Current Features 3.2. Current Events &Opportunities 3.3. New Design4. Land Use 4.1. Current Land Use 4.2. Envisioned Land Use5. Identity Elements 5.1. Landscaping 5.2. Sidewalks 5.3. Signage 5.4. Building Design 5.5. Streetscape 5.6. Public Space6. Circulation 6.1. Public Transit 6.2. Private Automobile 6.3. Pedestrians7. Implementation Strategies 7.1. Incentives for Homeowners 7.2. Incentives for Business Owners8. ConclusionAppendix A.1 .Cities Referenced A.2. Housing Styles A.3. Churches A.4. Events A.5. City History A.6. City Demographics A.7. Businesses within the District A.8. Figure Citations 3
  4. 4. CHAPTER ONE VISION 4
  5. 5. Imagine a place where you can let your dog play freely, have dinner at yourfavorite restaurant, and watch a movie under the stars, all within a walkable area. Aplace where your parking spot for home and work are the same space. A place calledSigler Village. Sigler Village will bring out the natural environment of Sigler Park into thecommercial and residential area to create a welcoming and relaxing ambiance forresidents and visitors alike. Our vision for Westminster is to provide the city with a gathering space that isboth unique and stands apart from Little Saigon and the Civic Center. In contrast toother neighborhoods in the city, Sigler Village will provide the perfect blend ofcommercial and recreational activities for everyone in the community. The mixed usesof this area will create unique opportunities for business owners and residents that areunmatched anywhere else in the city. The influx of visitors to the neighborhood willallow existing businesses to thrive, while creating new economic opportunities. Current and future residents of the downtown will be living an ideal lifestyle thatmany cities do not offer. They will be able to work, shop, dine, and play all withinfootsteps of their homes. With Sigler Park as the heart of the downtown, groups of allages and backgrounds will have a beautiful, welcoming space to meet and mingle. Theevolutionary process of combining different land uses, people, and opportunities inSigler Village will give the neighborhood a distinct identity that the whole city will beproud of. On the following page is an overview map of Sigler Village showing thelocation of improvements. 5
  6. 6. 6 Figure 1.1: Overview map of Sigler Village
  7. 7. CHAPTERCHAPTER TWOBACKGROUND 7
  8. 8. 2.1. Demographics to be Served Westminster thrives with its rich culture and history that is unmatched inOrange Country. More notably, its share of social conflicts, which include the birthplaceof what would eventually lead to Brown v. Board of Education, and the struggle of theVietnamese community. More recently, with the influx of a growing Latino population,Westminster has grown to become a diverse and proud community.2.2. Boundaries of Sigler Village Given the initial limitations for the new downtown (with a suggestion for usingthe Goldenwest/Westminster intersection), we chose to focus our plans around SiglerPark. With existing facilities, services, and community activities already located at SiglerPark, this makes it an ideal location to start the evolutionary process for creating thevision of Sigler Village. The area around the park was chosen because it is less than a ½-mile across, making it ideal for pedestrians to enjoy all areas of the downtown.Northern boundary: Westminster Boulevard Though Westminster Boulevard is a high-traffic area, its existing conditions allowfor the businesses to be easily overlooked. This street presents a perfect opportunity forrevitalization because of the many underutilized lots.Southern boundary: Main Street Our desire to create a walkable community makes Main Street a logicalsouthern boundary for the downtown. Residents of the surrounding multifamily 8
  9. 9. residential homes will easily be able to access the park and all other services in thedowntown.Eastern boundary: Hoover Street The existing train tracks and Hoover Street create a natural break and a clearentrance for the downtown.Western boundary: Goldenwest Street The existing commercial center on the northwest corner of theGoldenwest/Westminster intersection will serve as a complimentary retail center to thedowntown. The fact that Goldenwest Street is a wide, arterial street makes it difficult toexpand the downtown to the west. Figure 2.1: Boundaries for Sigler Village 9
  10. 10. CHAPTER THREE SIGLER PARK 10
  11. 11. 3.1. Current Features In Sigler Village, parks are not just for kids! Sigler Park is currently a destinationfor community events and, as a part of the downtown; it will continue to serve a widerange of visitors. The park is a six-acre recreational area which includes basketballcourts, two handball courts, picnic tables, restrooms, areas for children to play, and asoftball field. Figure 3.1: Current layout of Sigler ParkIn addition, Sigler Park includes a WIC Center, which is a federally funded health andnutrition program for women, infants, and children. The photos on the next page showthe children’s playground and Splash Pad at Sigler Park. 11
  12. 12. Figure 3.2 (left): Children’s playground; Figure 3.3 (right): Splash Pad3.2. Current Events & Opportunities Sigler Park is a natural selection for the center of a downtown because of theannual community events that currently take place there. The park hosts summerconcerts in the park on Thursday evenings, where the community enjoys a variety offree concerts. Concertgoers bring picnic dinners and also enjoy the delicious food itemsavailable through non-profit organizations. In addition, Sigler Park hosts annual eventssuch as Public Safety Day, which is held once every summer. This fun and educationalevent provides children and their families an opportunity to become familiar with theCitys safety staff and services. In addition, Westminster Police Department and OrangeCounty Fire Authority display vehicles and equipment and present excitingdemonstrations.3.3. New Design The new design of Sigler Park will include an expansion of the park, extending toLocust Street on the west, making it ideal for new activities. The expansion will allow forthe addition of a Vietnamese garden, dog park, community garden, and amphitheater. 12
  13. 13. Figure 3.4: New layout of Sigler ParkEntryway A grand entryway will be erected on the north side of the park, facing ChestnutStreet, to welcome visitors. We have two options for the entryway. The entryway will beattached to a low wall that goes along the edges of the park, with openings at differentlocations. The wall will both protect children playing inside the park as well as provide anice sitting area. Figure 3.5: Option #1 for Sigler Park 13
  14. 14. Figure 3.6: Option #2 for Sigler Park entrywayRestrooms Since the park is being expanded, wewant to add new men’s and women’srestrooms that match with the style of theresidential buildings in the downtown.Restrooms may seem like a small addition, buthuman comfort is our main goal, and clean Figure 3.7 (above): New restrooms at Sigler Parknew restrooms will be just another reason for families and other visitors to stay in thepark.Vietnamese garden The Vietnamese-themed garden will spark conversation and remind visitors ofthe city’s rich history. The idea is to increase social interaction and recreation within thepark. It will also be an eye-catching node in the park. 14
  15. 15. Figure 3.8: Vietnamese garden at Sigler ParkDog park A dog park will be a well-needed feature for the many furry friends of residents.It will also act as a great host for the city’s recurring event, “The Little Westminster DogShow.”Amphitheatre A raised amphitheatre at the park will allow for the summer outdoor movies inWestminster to move to Sigler Park and provide entertainment in a naturalenvironment. The amphitheatre will also allow guests to sit back and relax while theywatch a concert or a play.Community events Public chalk walks and art exhibits at Sigler Park will let community membersshow off their artistic side while listening to live music. During the art exhibits, children 15
  16. 16. can become a butterfly or pirate, as they get their faces painted by local artists.Everyone will get to celebrate creativity together.Community garden A community garden in the park extension will enable residents to grow theirown food when they otherwise may not have had the chance. Figure 3.9: Community garden at Sigler ParkThe garden will be beneficial both physically (encouraging healthy eating habits) andsocially (encouraging interactions with other “gardeners”). Fresh produce is always inseason, and what better way to get people to work together than taking turns takingcare of a delicious assortment of fruits and vegetables? Possible sponsors could includethe local churches near Sigler Park, the local schools, private businesses, and theWestminster recreation department. 16
  17. 17. CHAPTER FOUR LAND USE 17
  18. 18. 4.1. Current Land Use4.1. The existing area consists of an assorted mix of land uses, poorly-maintainedbuildings, and little pedestrian activity. In its current state, the site lacks an individualidentity which separates it from the rest of the city. Currently, Sigler Park hosts manycommunity events, but it is lacking facilities that would utilize the full potential of thepark. The abundance of auto repair shops within the downtown boundaries makes thearea unappealing for other business owners to invest in, while residential properties inthe project area lack character and aesthetic appeal. Overall, this area is in need of anew identity. As shown in the land use map below, the uses are separatedgeographically, which does not unify the area. Figure 4.1: Current land use for the area 18
  19. 19. 4.2. ENVISIONED LAND USE Sigler Village will be a neighborhood in which uses and activities flow effortlesslywith each other. Its mixed-use areas will enable residents to live, work, and enjoy freetime all in one place. Sigler Park will be expanded to the west to allow for more activitiesthat will serve the needs of the community. Rather than demolishing all of the existingbuildings and replacing them with new ones, we want to work with the existingproperty owners and encourage the revitalization of the businesses as well as thehomes. The envisioned land use is shown below. The red area is commercial use, theblue is residential, and the yellow is mixed-use. Figure 4.2: Envisioned land use for Sigler VillageThe downtown will have a large mixed-use area, where residences will be combinedwith shops and restaurants, so that services and places of recreation will be very nearthe homes. 19
  20. 20. CHAPTER FIVEIDENTITY ELEMENTS 20
  21. 21. Sigler Village will be a destination for people near and far. We want the image ofSigler Park to stay in the minds of the young and old long after they leave thedowntown. We want people to come back frequently because it sets itself apart from itssurroundings. The only way to have all of these things is to create an identity that unifiesall of the areas of the downtown.5.1. Landscaping Taking environmental factors into consideration, we have chosen drought-resistant plants to beautify Sigler Village. We feel that it is important to select plantsthat will compliment the area and also withstand the dry summer months.Flowers The flowers will be placed in planters in various areas, such as adjacent toseating, along walls, and on sidewalks. Figure 5.1 (left): Achillea flower; Figure 5.2 (center): Bluebeard flower; Figure 5.3 (right): Baby’s breath flowerTrees The existing palm trees that line Westminster Boulevard provide no shade, andare unmaintained. The downtown will feature an eclectic assortment of trees. 21
  22. 22. Figure 5.4 (left): Black Locust tree; Figure 5.5 (right): Staghorn Sumac treeThese trees will enhance the downtown’s aesthetics year-round and provide much-needed shade for visitors exploring the downtown during hot months.Figure 5.6: Typical view of trees across Westminster Boulevard. The trees help tie inthe natural environment of the park with the rest of the downtown.Shade-giving trees would line the sidewalks and street medians to protect pedestriansfrom sun rays as well as to enhance the image of the street. 22
  23. 23. Sidewalks Sidewalks in Sigler Village will contrast the strong colors used for the buildings.To create unity within the downtown, the same tile pattern will be used at everycrosswalk in the district.Signage The downtown will have unique signage throughout the downtown designedspecifically for Sigler Village. Appropriate way-finding signage will identify specific sitesof interest and parking areas to residents and visitors as well as strengthen SiglerVillage’s image and help to create a sense of place. • Business signs/marquees: The business owners in Sigler Village will have a variety of sign options. This will enable businesses to distinguish themselves while maintaining unity within the downtown. This type of signage is directed at pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use frontages, streets and districts. Figure 5.7: Signs extending from building 23
  24. 24. Figure5.8: Extending sign and awning sign Figure 5.9: Sign on building and hanging sign• Gateway sign(s): One of the first things that will welcome guests to Sigler Village will be gateway signage, which will be located at each end of our district on Westminster Boulevard, at the Hoover Street and Goldenwest Street intersections. These signs will become recognizable landmarks for Sigler Village. 24
  25. 25. Figure 5.10: Sigler Village gateway signBuilding Design Upon entering Sigler Village, one will not be able to help but recognize thebeautiful palette of colors and distinguishing architecture that sets apart the downtownfrom the rest of the city. Playing off of some of the existing buildings in the city, thedowntown will incorporate Spanish architecture to maintain a connection to the rest ofthe city. The following images show our desired color palette and architectural style.The downtown will maintain Westminster’s small-town feel by ensuring that no buildingwill rise above two stories. Low building heights and eye-catching architecture willenhance the walkability of the downtown. 25
  26. 26. Figure 5.9 (top left): Color palette for commercial buildings; Figure 5.8 (top right): Spanish style architecture; Figure 5.10 (bottom): Possible colors for entire downtown. Figure 5.11: Potential look of various buildings in Sigler VillageThe businesses along Westminster Boulevard will incorporate a variety of colors that willcompliment each other while distinguishing the area from the rest of the city. 26
  27. 27. Streetscape • Benches: Enhancing the pedestrian experience even further, the addition of benches placed throughout the downtown adds an aspect of comfort to visiting patrons. Benches within the district will be wooden to bring out the fundamental nature of the park. Figure 5.11: Bench style to be used • Trash cans: To maintain the inviting atmosphere of Sigler Village, trash cans and recycle bins will be placed along the sidewalks to keep it clean. They will be wooden, to match the benches, to create a unified look. Figure 5.12 (left): Wooden trash can; Figure 5.13 (right): Wooden recycle bin • Lighting: Sigler Village will be as enjoyable at night as it is during the day. Lighting in the district will double as a safety feature, while creating an inviting ambiance. There will be three types of lighting throughout the downtown 27
  28. 28. • Light posts: Metal, with two lantern-style hanging lights. Found nowhere else in the city, these lights will easily identify Sigler Village.• Building lights: Buildings will have small lights on their walls that resemble the hanging lights on the streets. This will be to enhance the connection between streets with another unifying element.• Tree lighting: Trees along Westminster Boulevard will be wrapped with white lights year-round. Residential streets will not have this type of lighting, but they will Figure 5.14: Light post have lamp posts that are common style to be used throughout the downtown. This is so that Westminster Boulevard can maintain itself as the main thoroughfare for the downtown. This eye-catching feature is very effective in distinguishing a main corridor from other streets. Figure 5.15: Tree lighting for Westminster Blvd. 28
  29. 29. • Public Space: A small landscaped area will be created on Westminster Boulevard that will allow for passersby to sit down and relax before they continue on with their day. It will be a place to have a quiet lunch while people-watching. Public art may also be displayed in this space.Figure 5.16: Public space next to decorative wall. The wall hides the parkingstructure from pedestrian view. 29
  30. 30. CHAPTER SIXCIRCULATION 30
  31. 31. One of the main goals for Sigler Village is to improve accessibility within thedowntown area. Anticipating the popularity of the downtown, the vision would be tocreate a space which is easily accessible by car, public transit, and by pedestrians.6.1. Public Transit The current public transit system which serves the downtown area will besufficient in addressing the future needs of riders who will visit the downtown. Thereare currently two main bus routes that run through the district. The Orange CountyTransportation Authority offers discounted rates for seniors and students, and this willaid in encouraging visitors of all ages into the downtown.6.2. Private Automobiles The expected influx of visitors to the downtown will create a need for additionalparking that the area cannot currently handle. To mitigate this issue, the proposition of parallel street parking with curb extensions along Westminster Boulevard has been offered as a solution. Moreover, the additions of on street parking as well as twodesignated parking garages for the downtown are envisioned for the increased parking demand. The structures will be located at: (1) Olive St. and Plaza St. and (2) behind the McDonald’s on Locust St. The structures will have a façade that matches the proposedarchitectural styles of the area and will have retail on the first floor with parking on the second and third floors. The parking lot will be hidden from view on the Westminster Boulevard side by a decorative or vegetation-covered wall. Having two parking 31
  32. 32. structures in different areas of the downtown will give visitors the choice of parking near Sigler Park or parking closer to the main thoroughfare, Westminster Boulevard. Figure 6.1: Location of parking structures6.3. Pedestrians In the spirit of emanating the park’s characteristics out into the surroundingcommunity, we want the downtown to be as full of pedestrians as possible. Seeingothers walk beside you or cross your path gives a level of comfort that cars speedingpast does not. We want to make Sigler Village as pedestrian-friendly as possible, and wehave come up with three main ways to do it.Crosswalks Though added parking will be necessary to facilitate access to the downtown, wewant to create a safe and inviting experience for pedestrians. Several crosswalks will beadded in order to improve the flow of pedestrian traffic throughout Sigler Village. 32
  33. 33. Figure 6.2 (left): A typical crosswalk at Sigler Village; Figure 6.3 (above): material for crosswalksCurb extensions To provide an increased sense of safety for pedestrians, curb extensions will beadded on Westminster Boulevard and possibly other high-traffic streets. Theseextensions give more room to pedestrians and provide more space for landscaping. Curbextensions also provide for more variety in how a street looks. Straight, narrowsidewalks are boring, and curb extensions give interest to the streetscape and providefor more freedom of movement. Figure 6.4: Curb extensions along Westminster Boulevard 33
  34. 34. Alleys While enjoying the downtown, pedestrians like to have a place where they canwalk freely without having to worry about the distraction of cars driving by. Alleys inthe commercial and mixed-use areas will add to the pedestrian accessibility to thesurrounding areas in our district. The alleys will enhance the pedestrian experienceby creating nooks where automobile traffic is blocked. Since cars will not be passingthrough the alleys, the alleys will be places where special events can take place, likea farmers’ market or street fair. The following image shows how an alley can bemade into a colorful, pedestrian-only walkway. Figure 6.5: Pedestrian alley 34
  35. 35. CHAPTER SEVENIMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIESIMPLEMENTATION ME 35
  36. 36. 7.1. Incentives for HomeownersMulti-family: Westminster Multi-Family Block Grant Program The Multi-Family Block Grant program for Westminster is offered through theCity of Westminster’s Redevelopment agency; and is designed to assist multi-familyresidential complexes with funding for aesthetic improvements to their buildings.Complexes and multi-family residences that are owned by a single property owner, andnot owned by a corporation would be eligible to qualify for these newly created grants ifthe structures have between 4-15 rentable units. The grant would be available to any multi-family complex located near or aroundSigler Park, with boundaries to the North of Westminster Blvd, Eastern boundary ofHoover, Western boundary of Golden West Blvd and Southern boundary Main Street.Furthermore this grant would enable the eligible multi-family complexes to improvetheir overall appearance, increase their marketability and safety, and create a unifiedvisual impact on the community.Purpose • Revitalize the surrounding community and homes around the newly created Westminster Village. • Increase neighborhood beatification, neighborhood safety and increase marketability of existing rental complexes • Appeal to the most common types of complexes in the area, roughly 4-15 unit complexes. 36
  37. 37. Funding • Funding would be available through various City, State and Federal grant programs.Eligible Apartment Complexes • Complexes ranging from 4-15 rentable tenant dwellings with 70% equity in the property. • Complexes that have an 80% or more occupancy rate. • Property must be located in Sigler Park development area, with boundaries to the North of Westminster Blvd, Eastern boundary of Hover, Western boundary of Golden West Blvd and Southern boundary Main Street.Eligible Projects Building code violations Driveway (concrete) Electrical repairs Exterior painting Fencing/Gates Fumigation Heater/A.C Fixing external facades Landscaping Repairing unit front doors Exterior Painting Replacing window screens Window repairs Re-roofing Sandblast/Stucco Structural repairs Needed tenant repairs Water heater repairs 37
  38. 38. The following images show what apartment buildings could look like once the propertyowners take advantage of this new incentive program.Figure 7.2: Typical apartment complex within Sigler VillageFigure 7.3: Possible renovation of apartment complex 38
  39. 39. Single-family: Home Enhancement Loan Program (HELP) For single-family homes, the city of Westminster has a special program thatprovides an incentive for homeowners to improve their properties. The HomeEnhancement Loan Program (HELP) offered by the Westminster Redevelopment Agencyis to assist low-to-moderate income homeowners to finance home repairs andimprovement activities on a citywide basis for the primary purpose of eliminatingunsafe, unsanitary, or deteriorating conditions. Furthermore, it is to improve the overallquality of residential neighborhoods through preserving the architectural integrity ofhousing and providing a visual impact of the community. Figure 7.4: Vision of typical residential street in Sigler VillageEligible Properties1. The property must be a single family detached home.2. The property must be in need of repairs to: correct existing code violations, and provide exterior/interior improvements, and promote neighborhood safety.3. Property must be located in the City of WestminsterEligible Projects Building code violations Driveway (concrete) Electrical repair Exterior painting Fencing/Gates Fumigation Heater Interior painting Landscaping Front door Garage door Screens Windows Re-roofing Sandblast/Stucco Structural repairs Vinyl flooring Water heater 39
  40. 40. With this program, the city attaches a lean on a property against the equity youhave in your home. The city then gives you money and it’s not due to be repaid back tothem unless you sell your house or take out a second mortgage on your house. Youmust own the home before you can qualify, so you can’t be making any mortgagepayments. The lean means that it is a legal obligation against the property by the city,and it must be dealt with before any other action can be taken with the property. Thefollowing images show how single-family homes could be improved with HELP.Figure 7.5: Typical house in Sigler Village (currently)Figure 7.6: Possible renovation of house in Figure 7.5 40
  41. 41. Figure 7.6: A typical two-story house in Sigler Village areaFigure 7.7: Possible renovation of home in Figure 7.6 41
  42. 42. 7.2 Incentives for Business Owners7.2Federal New Markets Tax Credit Program The New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program permits taxpayers to receive acredit against Federal income taxes for making qualified equity investments indesignated Community Development Entities (CDEs) such as Westminster’s CommunityRedevelopment Agency. The credit provided to the investor totals 39 percent of the costof the investment and is claimed over a seven-year credit allowance period. In each ofthe first three years, the investor receives a credit equal to five percent of the totalamount paid for the stock or capital interest at the time of purchase. For the final fouryears, the value of the credit is six percent annually. Investors may not redeem theirinvestments in CDEs prior to the conclusion of the seven-year period. The program would be offered to businesses along Westminster Boulevard andwill spur investment of private sector capital in the community by providing a tax creditfor taxpayers who make qualified equity investments. 42
  43. 43. CHAPTER EIGHT CONCLUSION 43
  44. 44. As the world’s communities become denser, “greener,” and more walkable,other cities can look to Sigler Village as a prime example of a perfect downtown. Citiesof comparable size can use this example as a template for fostering new developmentwhile retaining their character. Other cities in southern California have tried to createdowntowns where one is lacking, but they oftentimes fail because they ignore thepotential of what is already there. We realize that Sigler Park is already a big part of the community, which is why itwill be the center of the downtown. The expansion of the park will make it possible forall visitors to enjoy the recreational and social activities it provides. With the improvedsidewalks and eye-catching streetscape, pedestrians will not have a dull moment whilewalking through the downtown. Tourists will also be welcomed with plenty of parkingspaces. What all visitors will notice and remember is the unique identity of Sigler Village,provided by the unifying architecture and color palette. With the implementationstrategies we have proposed, it will be possible to turn an ordinary community into anextraordinary downtown. With the possibility of shopping, dining, and playing all within the same area,there will be no better place than Sigler Village to leave your itinerary to… serendipity. 44
  45. 45. APPENDIAPPENDICES 45
  46. 46. A.1. Cities ReferencedCity Articles/References City of Westminster, CA Zoning Code update intinal study, City of Westminster, 2009 City of Pasadena, CA The Planning Center, 1580 Metro Drive Costa Mesa, CA 92626 City of Long beach, CA Wendy Grant, Senior Planner City of Pomona, CA City of Fullerton, CA Downtown Action Plan Update, City of Redmon, OR, 2006 City of Arcadia, CA The Oregon Downtown Development Association City of Covina, CA Salem, OR, 97308; Vicki D Dugger, Executive Director City of St. Louis, MO City of Stockton, CA Downtown Stockton Strategic Action Plan, August 2006 City of Redmond, OR Moore Iacofano Goltsman, Inc. 800 Hearst Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710 Daniel Iacofano, Eric Phillips, Dan Drazen 46
  47. 47. A.2. Housing StylesRanch:The predominant style for housing in the area is the single story Ranch style. The roofs in thearea are mostly low-pitched hipped roofs, although there are several gabled roofs in the area,which are finished with asphalt shingles. The houses have standard 12” overhangs. The frontporches are formed by either small shed roofs, or wood supported roofs. The exterior walls arepredominantly stucco finished, although some brick cladding is also used.Neo-Tudor:There is also a presence of Neo-Tudor style houses in the area. These multistory houses havelow-pitched gabled roofs, which are finished with asphalt shingles. The exterior walls arefinished with stucco and false half timbering.Spanish:There are a few examples of Spanish architecture in the area. These multistory houses use acombination of hipped and gabled roofs, finished with a concrete S-tile. The exterior walls arestucco finished, with a light color, and false clay pipe details at the gable ends. Several columnsthat form arches overhead support the entryways. The windows are surrounded by stuccocovered foam trim and by false shutters.Commercial:The commercial architecture in the area is typical box retail. The commercial buildings in thearea are typically single story, flat roofed, buildings. The exterior walls are predominatelystucco finished, but some examples also have wood siding or stone cladding. The entrywaysare covered by stucco overhangs, which also hold the signs for the businesses 47
  48. 48. A.3. Churches Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church Good Shepard Utd. Methodist Church 14072 Olive Street 8152 McFadden Ave. Westminster Westminster CA 714-892-4489 714-897-0100 Korean Catholic Ministry Little Saigon Vietnamese Church 7655 Trask Ave, Westminster, CA 10321 Bolsa Ave. Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-897-6510 714-839-8733 Westminster Orthodox Presbyterian Church First Presbyterian Church 10101 Cunningham Ave 10321 Bolsa Ave Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-531-9950 714-839-8733Chinese Presbyterian Church of Orange County Church of Jesus Christ LDS 14614 Magnolia St. 10332 Bolsa Ave Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-893-5500 714-554-7747 Christ Church of Westminster Bethany Bible Fellowship Church 14061 Chestnut Street 13431 Edwards Street Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-893-6555 714-891-5859 Orange Korean Evangelical Church La Puerta Avierta Church 13522 Goldenwest Street 14061 Chestnut Street Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-891-2370 714-899-2243 Calvary Chapel Pacific Coast Church of Jesus Christ LDS 6400 Westminster Blvd. 14271 Locust Street, Westminster, CA Westminster, CA 714-893-4141 714- 897-6060 Reformation Lutheran Church Westminster Foursquare Church 15750 Magnolia Street 8091 22nd Street Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-893-5183 714-891-5869 48
  49. 49. Journey Evangelical Church Westminster Lutheran Church 14614 Magnolia Ave. 13841 Milton Ave Westminster, CA Westminster CA 714-893-5500 714-895-3838 Mid cities Baptist Church First Presbyterian Church 14391 Newland Street 7702 Westminster Blvd Westminster, CA Westminster, CA714-893-1624 or 714-379-5833 714-893-1393 Vietnamese Baptist Church Vietnamese Christian Church 14200 Goldenwest Street 13421 Edwards Street Westminster Ca Westminster Ca 714-892-7835 714-897-1033Vietnamese Full Gospel Church Inspirational Spiritualist Church 14381 Magnolia Street 14282 Beach Blvd Westminster Ca Westminster Ca 714-891-8035 714-891-7291 49
  50. 50. EventsA.4. EventsFarmers’ MarketCertified Farmers’ Market sponsored by Orange County Farm Bureau(714) 573-0374Approx.: 20 vendorsEvery Wednesday 12-5, in the Mall (Goldenwest & Bolsa, Ave)Ours could be on SaturdaysArt FairCurrently: “Art-A-Fair” at the Mall (Goldenwest & Bolsa, Ave)Every Wed. 12-5 50
  51. 51. A.5. City History • The area of Westminster was originally founded as a colony in 1870, but there have been many previous settlers before then that dated all the way back to approximately 8,000 years ago. These included the Oak Grove who were the original settlers and then followed by the Gabrieleno Natives later. • In the year 1492, the most of the area of North America was under the ownership of Spain, and was under Spanish control until the 1800s when the U.S. moved in to occupy the area. • During California’s admission to the Union in the 1850s, an American named Abel Stearns acquired shares from the former Rancho Los Bolsas of the Spanish. • The official founding of Westminster colony was by the Presbyterian Reverend, Lemuel P. Webber in 1870 after purchasing around 6,000 acres of Stearn’s ranch area. The name “Westminster” was named from the assembly of 1643 which prescribed the basic tenants of the Presbyterian Church. The Reverend promoted others to move to the colony and this made the population grow. • By the end of 1874 the colony grew to 225 inhabitants, and the first community newspaper was started in 1878 • All throughout the 1880s, Westminster flourished agriculturally. • Continuing throughout the 1990s, Westminster continued to grow with it’s agriculture and laborers were coming in from other areas including Los Angeles and even San Francisco. • By the 1930s, Westminster began to grow into more than just a farming community but the depression and natural disasters hindered with growth. • WWII brought change to the area in the 1940s, and many men joined the armed forces and the Japanese Americans were relocated out of Westminster. • By the time the 1960s came around, population almost quadrupled and this was a period of great growth for the community. • The 1980s saw a huge wave of immigration from Southeast Asia, as people fled after the Vietnam War. Because of this, many Southeast Asian businesses opened up in Westminster, especially in the Bolsa Ave area. • Westminster still continues to grow today and further into the next decade. 51
  52. 52. A.6. City DemographicsHOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES: In 2006-2008 there were 27,000 households inWestminster city. The average household size was 3.4 people.Families made up 77 percent of the households in Westminster city. This figure includesboth married-couple families (59 percent) and other families (19 percent).Nonfamily households made up 23 percent of all households in Westminster city. Mostof the nonfamily households were people living alone, but some were composed ofpeople living in households in which no one was related to the householder.NATIVITY AND LANGUAGE: Forty-seven percent of the people living in Westminster cityin 2006-2008 were foreign born. Fifty-three percent was native, including 40 percentwho were born in California.Among people at least five years old living in Westminster city in 2006-2008, 64 percentspoke a language other than English at home. Of those speaking a language other thanEnglish at home, 29 percent spoke Spanish and 71 percent spoke some other language;57 percent reported that they did not speak English "very well."GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY: In 2006-2008, 86 percent of the people at least one year oldliving in Westminster city were living in the same residence one year earlier; 10 percenthad moved during the past year from another residence in the same county, 2 percentfrom another county in the same state, 1 percent from another state, and 1 percentfrom abroad.EDUCATION: In 2006-2008, 74 percent of people 25 years and over had at leastgraduated from high school and 21 percent had a bachelors degree or higher. Twenty-six percent were dropouts; they were not enrolled in school and had not graduatedfrom high school.The total school enrollment in Westminster city was 24,000 in 2006-2008. Nurseryschool and kindergarten enrollment was 2,200 and elementary or high schoolenrollment was 15,000 children. College or graduate school enrollment was 6,600.INDUSTRIES: In 2006-2008, for the employed population 16 years and older, the leadingindustries in Westminster city were Manufacturing, 20 percent, and Educationalservices, and health care, and social assistance, 15 percent.OCCUPATIONS AND TYPE OF EMPLOYER: Among the most common occupations were:Sales and office occupations, 27 percent; Management, professional, and related 52
  53. 53. occupations, 27 percent; Service occupations, 20 percent; Production, transportation,and material moving occupations, 18 percent; and Construction, extraction,maintenance and repair occupations, 8 percent. Eighty-three percent of the peopleemployed were Private wage and salary workers; 10 percent was Federal, state, or localgovernment workers; and 8 percent was Self-employed in own not incorporatedbusiness workers.TRAVEL TO WORK: Eighty-one percent of Westminster city workers drove to work alonein 2006-2008, 9 percent carpooled, 3 percent took public transportation, and 4 percentused other means. The remaining 3 percent worked at home. Among those whocommuted to work, it took them on average 26.6 minutes to get to work.INCOME: The median income of households in Westminster city was $59,731. Eighty-two percent of the households received earnings and 15 percent received retirementincome other than Social Security. Twenty-eight percent of the households receivedSocial Security. The average income from Social Security was $14,507. These incomesources are not mutually exclusive; that is, some households received income frommore than one source.POVERTY AND PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS: In 2006-2008, 11 percentof people were in poverty. Fourteen percent of related children under 18 were belowthe poverty level, compared with 12 percent of people 65 years old and over. Tenpercent of all families and 18 percent of families with a female householder and nohusband present had incomes below the poverty level.POPULATION OF Westminster city: In 2006-2008, Westminster city had a totalpopulation of 90,000 - 46,000 (51 percent) females and 44,000 (49 percent) males. Themedian age was 38.1 years. Twenty-four percent of the population was under 18 yearsand 14 percent was 65 years and older. For people reporting one race alone, 45 percent was White; 1 percent was Black orAfrican American; less than 0.5 percent was American Indian and Alaska Native; 43percent was Asian; less than 0.5 percent was Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander,and 8 percent was some other race. Two percent reported Two or more races. Twenty-four percent of the people in Westminster city was Hispanic. Thirty percent of thepeople in Westminster city was White non-Hispanic. People of Hispanic origin may be ofany race.HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS: In 2006-2008, Westminster city had a total of 28,000housing units, 4 percent of which were vacant. Of the total housing units, 61 percentwas in single-unit structures, 27 percent was in multi-unit structures, and 12 percentwas mobile homes. Eleven percent of the housing units were built since 1990. 53
  54. 54. OCCUPIED HOUSING UNIT CHARACTERISTICS: In 2006-2008, Westminster city had27,000 occupied housing units - 15,000 (57 percent) owner occupied and 12,000 (43percent) renter occupied. Two percent of the households did not have telephoneservice and 6 percent of the households did not have access to a car, truck, or van forprivate use. Multi Vehicle households were not rare. Thirty-nine percent had twovehicles and another 29 percent had three or more.HOUSING COSTS: The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners was $2,300,nonmortgaged owners $395, and renters $1,302. Fifty-four percent of owners withmortgages, 11 percent of owners without mortgages, and 64 percent of renters inWestminster city spent 30 percent or more of household income on housing.Source:http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/NPTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=16000US0684550&-qr_name=ACS_2008_3YR_G00_NP01&-ds_name=&-redoLog=false 54
  55. 55. A.7. Businesses Within the AreaHome Depot USPSKohl’s dept. store The UPS storeArco gas station Ocean Bridge EnterprisesOffice Furniture Outlet DatamartMc Donalds B & S Tax & Business ServicesCity Center Service Bodie’s Glass ServiceATM World Advantech Office EquipmentMarina Label Inc Furniture storesSunny Printing and Copy K O D Home ProductE Labels Vision SignDirectchannel Wholesale Inc. Bonjour Staffing IncThanh Media Hispanic Services CorporationLe’s Travel A variety of fast food (American)Le Hoi Consultant A variety of sit down and pick up restaurants (Vietnamese) 55
  56. 56. A.8. Figure CitationsFigure 2.1: Satellite photo of district. Source: http://images.google.comFigure 3.2: Sigler Park playground. Source: http://www.westminster- ca.gov/oldsite/commsrvs/parks/city_parks.htmlFigure 3.3: Splash Pad at Sigler Park. Source: http://www.westminster- ca.gov/oldsite/commsrvs/parks/city_parks.htmlFigure 4.1: Satellite photo of district. Source: http://maps.google.comFigure 4.2: Satellite photo of district. Source: http://maps.google.comFigure 5.12: Light post style to be used. Source: http://quezi.com/wp- content/uploads/2009/03/lyme_regis_street_light.jpgFigure 5.13: Wooden trash can. Source: http://www.acsupplies.com/images/woodenTrashCan.jpgFigure 5.14: Wooden recycle bin. Source: http://peaceinheart.com/images/Part%20No%201200WD00%20- %20Wood%20DBL%20Recycle%20Bin.jpg 56

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