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Mega-Whats 2011 Semifinal 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Mega-Whats 2011 Semifinal
    Kiran Vijayakumar
  • 2. #
    Write Brothers
  • 3. ?
    5 questions
    Identify the person (5 points) and his middle name (5 points)
    10 points bonus if you get all
  • 4. 1
    This Utopian Socialist published The Human Drift (1894), which advocated that all industry should be taken over by a single corporation owned by the public, and that everyone in the US should live in a giant city called Metropolis powered by Niagara Falls. A later book, World Corporation (1910), was a prospectus for a company set up to create this vision. He offered Theodore Roosevelt the presidency of the company, with a fee of one million dollars—Roosevelt declined the offer. His last book, The People’s Corporation (1924), was written with Upton Sinclair. Identify this one time salesman for the Crown Cork and Seal Company.
  • 5. 2
    Identify this gentleman who almost always thought big?
  • 6. 3
    Whose unique date of death was the subject of a 1982 book by Peter Kreeft titled Between Heaven and Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death with ____, ____ and ____?
  • 7. 4
    On whose work is this movie based on?
  • 8. 5
    He drew inspiration from historic events (like Hitler’s Anschluss, the Mukden incident that led to the Chinese-Japanese War of 1934, the struggle between Romanian Iron Guard and King of Romania, Carol II, Cold War and the Space programs). He used the ligneclairestyle to enthrall millions all over the world. Who?
  • 9. ?
    Answers
  • 10. 1
    This Utopian Socialist published The Human Drift (1894), which advocated that all industry should be taken over by a single corporation owned by the public, and that everyone in the US should live in a giant city called Metropolis powered by Niagara Falls. A later book, World Corporation (1910), was a prospectus for a company set up to create this vision. He offered Theodore Roosevelt the presidency of the company, with a fee of one million dollars—Roosevelt declined the offer. His last book, The People’s Corporation (1924), was written with Upton Sinclair. Identify this one time salesman for the Crown Cork and Seal Company.
  • 11. 1
    King Gillette  Camp
  • 12. 2
    Identify this gentleman who almost always thought big?
  • 13. 2
    IsambardBrunel  Kingdom
  • 14. 3
    Whose unique date of death was the subject of a 1982 book by Peter Kreeft titled Between Heaven and Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death with ____, ____ and ____?
  • 15. 3
    C.S. Lewis  Staples
  • 16. 4
    On whose work is this movie based on?
  • 17. 4
    Philip K. Dick  Kindred
  • 18. 5
    He drew inspiration from historic events (like Hitler’s Anschluss, the Mukden incident that led to the Chinese-Japanese War of 1934, the struggle between Romanian Iron Guard and King of Romania, Carol II, Cold War and the Space programs). He used the ligneclairestyle to enthrall millions all over the world. Who?
  • 19. 5
    Georges Remi (Hergé)  Prosper
  • 20. #
    Dry Round
  • 21. 1
    Connect.
  • 22. 
  • 23. 1
    Gondolas – lift, airship, bridge, pod.
  • 24. Henry Dreyfuss, a young theatrical designer whose previous experience had been exclusively with designing stage sets and the interiors of cinemas, was commissioned in the early 1920s to design a replacement for the ‘candlestick’. He came up with a startlingly squat, slightly boxy, sleekly modern design that became the standard model throughout most of the world for most of the 20th century. It did its job so well and seemed so inevitable that it takes some effort to remember that someone had to conceive it, but in fact nearly everything about it—the amount of resistance, the low centre of gravity that made it next to impossible to knock over, the brilliant notion of having multiple functions contained in a single element—was the result of inspired thinking by a man who would normally never have been allowed anywhere near industrial design. What design?
    2
  • 25. 
  • 26. 2
    The telephone—with the cradle and receiver.
  • 27. 3
    In American history, the Gilded Age refers to the era of rapid economic and population growth during the post-Civil War and post-Reconstruction eras of the late 19th century. During the Gilded Age, ____, president of Standard Oil (and distantly related to a major coffee family), began collecting a specific item, usually from hard-up aristocrats, and eventually acquired about a third of all surviving copies, which today form the basis of an institution in Washington, DC. Who or what institution?
  • 28. 
  • 29. 3
    Henry Clay Folger’scollection of the First Folios of William Shakespeare form the basis of the great Folger Shakespeare Library.
  • 30. 4
    Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge developed the theory of punctuated equilibrium, in which evolutionary change occurs relatively rapidly, alternating with longer periods of relative evolutionary stability. It attracted fierce criticism from ‘gradualists’, some of whom jokingly referred to the theory as “evolution by ____”, which elicited Gould to respond in kind by describing gradualism as “evolution by ____”. Fill up with 2 derogatory terms (seemingly innocent by current standards).
  • 31. 
  • 32. 4
    Jerks; Creeps.
  • 33. 5
    What is the missing line from Paul Laurence Dunbar’s peomSympathy?
    ____, ah me,
    When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore,
    When he beats his bars and would be free;
    It is not a carol of joy or glee,
    But a prayer that he sends from his heart's deep core,
    But a plea, that upward to Heaven he flings –
    ____.
  • 34. 
  • 35. 5
    I know why the caged bird sings—Maya Angelou used it as the title of her autobiography.
    Bonus 
  • 36. B
    African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1872. In 1890, 18-year-old Dunbar wrote and edited Dayton’s first weekly African-American newspaper, The Tattler. A fledgling company set up by 2 of his high school acquaintances printed it during the entire 6 week run. Identify both of them.
  • 37. 
  • 38. B
    Wilbur and Orville Wright.
  • 39. 6
    Which phrase meaning ‘making every possible effort’ originates from what is shown here?
  • 40. 
  • 41. 6
    Pull out all the stops.
  • 42. 7
    This geek favourite is manufactured by a Milan- based company. It does not have an official pronunciation as it is a “brand name with undefined national identity”. The present-day version is specifically fashioned after Bruce Chatwin’sdescriptions of the ones he used in his travels. The name itself is a nickname that Chatwin uses in one of his most celebrated writings, The Songlines (1986). In this book Chatwin tells the story of his original supplier, a Paris-based seller who informed him that the last manufacturer, a small family-run firm in Tours, had discontinued production that year, after the death of the owner. What?
  • 43. 
  • 44. 7
    Moleskinenotebooks.
  • 45. 8
    This French mathematician was the captain and castellan of the castle at Ornans, for the King of Spain. He was later councillor and director general of moneys in the County of Burgundy. At Brussels, in 1631, he published his treatise La construction, l'usage, et les propriétés du quadrant nouveau de mathematiques, and dedicated it to the Infanta. His lasting claim to fame come from an improvement over something called Nonius. Who?
  • 46. 
  • 47. 8
    PierrerVernier—of the Vernierscale fame.
  • 48. 9
    Spin a yarn!
  • 49. 
  • 50. 9
    Green Eggs and Hamby Dr. Seuss.
    Bennett Cerf, his publisher, wagered $50 that Seuss could not write a book using only 50 different words. The bet came after Seuss completed The Cat in the Hat, which used 225 words.
  • 51. 10
    Connect:
  • 52. 
  • 53. 10
    Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) is situated in the premises of the erstwhile Prabhat Film Company in Pune, India.
  • 54. 11
    In Germany, it is ‘silent post’; in France, ‘Arab phone’; in Italy and Portugal, it is ‘cordless phone’; in Poland, it is ‘dumb telephone’; in US, it is just ‘telephone’. How it is commonly known in Britain and India, may be considered offensive elsewhere. What?
  • 55. 
  • 56. 11
    Chinese whispers.
  • 57. 12
    Where would one encounter some of the following: arrowhead, bank, bounce, brush fence, bullfinch, coffin, corner, ditch, drop fence, log fence, Normandy bank, oxer, rolltop, shark’s teeth, skinny, stone wall, sunken road, table, Trakehner and water?
  • 58. 
  • 59. 12
    These are the various types of obstacles in competitive horse jumping.
  • 60. 13
    This company was founded in 1887 and was originally called The Universal Woodworking Company Ltd. Their most famous product, named after an educational institution, was launched in 1935 and has worldwide sales of over 100 million units. Each unit bears the inscription “Complete & Accurate” and has a tin case containing 9 or 10 items, with practically no change from the original design. Identify this product popular in India as well.
  • 61. 
  • 62. 13
    Oxford Set of Mathematical Instruments, made by Helix.
  • 63. 14
    In 2009, ABC News research found that the Library of Congress lists 72 variants of (X), and the New York Times, Associated Press and Xinhua news sources used 40 additional variants. The confusion surrounding (X) is attributed to the lack of standardization of transliterating written and regionally pronounced Arabic. A1981 Saturday Night Live segment ridiculed the confusion with comparisons to ‘Jacuzzi’ and ‘Campari’. What is (X)?
  • 64. 
  • 65. 14
    English spelling of Muammar Gaddafi.
  • 66. 15
    What record started with C.I.D.in1956 and ended with MeriBiwiKaJawabNahinin 2004?
  • 67. 
  • 68. 15
    Jagdish Raj Khurana’s playing the role of a police officer in 144 films.
  • 69. 16
    His historic achievement came on May 6, 1954. In a BBC interview to commemorate the 50th anniversary, he said that saw his subsequent forty years of practicing as neurologist and some of the new procedures he introduced as being more significant than the achievement. His major contribution in academic medicine was in the field of autonomic failure, an area of neurology focusing on illnesses characterized by certain automatic responses of the nervous system (for example, elevated heart rate when standing up) not occurring. Who?
  • 70. 
  • 71. 16
    Dr. Roger Bannister, of the 4-minute mile fame.
    Bonus 
  • 72. B
    The historic run by Roger Bannister at Iffley Road Track in Oxford was broadcast live by BBC Radio. Who was the commentator? Also, name the stadium announcer who famously “teased” the crowd by drawing out the announcement as long as possible: “Ladies and gentlemen, here is the result of event 9, the one-mile: 1st, No. 41, R.G. Bannister, Amateur Athletic Association and formerly of Exeter and Merton Colleges, Oxford, with a time which is a new meeting and track record, and which - subject to ratification - will be a new English Native, British National, All-Comers, European, British Empire, and World Record. The time was 3...”
  • 73. 
  • 74. B
    Harold Abrahams, of Chariots of Fire fame and Norris McWhirter, of the Guinness Book of World Records fame.
  • 75. #
    Write Brothers
  • 76. 1
    He received a doctorate in systematic theology from Boston University in 1955 on the strength of a dissertation comparing the theologians Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Weiman. In a 1989–1990 review, the university discovered that he had plagiarized about a third of his thesis from a previous student’s dissertation. His most important ‘work’ was ‘inspired by’ something Archibald Carey Jr. did at the Republican National Convention in 1952. Who?
  • 77. 2
    Identify these rivers:
    Flows through Seoul where a total of 27 bridges cross it—one of which features prominently in The Host.
    The longest river on the Indonesian island of Java. Many discoveries of early hominid remains have been made at several sites in its valleys, including that of the first early human fossil found outside of Europe, the so-called ‘Java Man’ skull.
  • 78. 3
    This rock-shelter, meaning ‘big cave’ in Occitan, can be found near the commune of Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil(a UNESCO World Heritage Site) in southwestern France. What is its name?

  • 79. 3
  • 80. 4
    In pathology, this word is used as an adjective to mean ‘pertaining to tension, especially of muscles’. 17th century Greek writers believed health to be derived from firmly stretched muscles and thus the term was applied to restorative medicine. It is also used in music to denote the first note of a scale. What?
  • 81. 5
    Taken from the lady’s website. What text has been blackened?
  • 82. #
    Answers
  • 83. 1
    He received a doctorate in systematic theology from Boston University in 1955 on the strength of a dissertation comparing the theologians Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Weiman. In a 1989–1990 review, the university discovered that he had plagiarized about a third of his thesis from a previous student’s dissertation. His most important ‘work’ was ‘inspired by’ something Archibald Carey Jr. did at the Republican National Convention in 1952. Who?
  • 84. 1
    Martin Luther King Jr.
  • 85. 2
    Identify these rivers:
    Flows through Seoul where a total of 27 bridges cross it—one of which features prominently in The Host.
    The longest river on the Indonesian island of Java. Many discoveries of early hominid remains have been made at several sites in its valleys, including that of the first early human fossil found outside of Europe, the so-called ‘Java Man’ skull.
  • 86. 2
    Han. Solo.
  • 87. 3
    This rock-shelter, meaning ‘big cave’ in Occitan, can be found near the commune of Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil(a UNESCO World Heritage Site) in southwestern France. What is its name?

  • 88. 3
  • 89. 3
    L’abri de Cro-Magnon.
  • 90. 4
    In pathology, this word is used as an adjective to mean ‘pertaining to tension, especially of muscles’. 17th century Greek writers believed health to be derived from firmly stretched muscles and thus the term was applied to restorative medicine. It is also used in music to denote the first note of a scale. What?
  • 91. 4
    Tonic.
  • 92. 5
    Taken from the lady’s website. What text has been blackened?
  • 93. 5
    The Kinsey Report.
    Kinsey Millhone’s PI report on Sue Grafton.
  • 94. #
    Dry Round
  • 95. 1
    The term ____ is used to describe the geographical “lay” of San Marino, Vatican City and Lesotho. The term ____ is used to describe the “lay” of Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan. Identify both terms and tell us how they differ. (Both lists are exhaustive.)
  • 96. 
  • 97. 1
    Enclave  landlocked by a single country (on all sides).
    Doubly landlocked  a person in such a country has to cross at least two borders to reach a coastline.
  • 98. 2
    An era comes to an end. Explain.
  • 99. 
  • 100. 2
    The last picture to be developed on Kodachrome film. The photo was taken by Steve McCurry.
  • 101. 3
    G.K. Chesterton’s 1915 poem about a 16th century battle ends thus:
    ____ on his galley sets the sword back in the sheath
    (Don John of Austria rides homeward with a wreath.)
    And he sees across a weary land a straggling road in Spain,
    Up which a lean and foolish knight forever rides in vain,
    And he smiles, but not as Sultans smile, and settles back the blade...
    (But Don John of Austria rides home from the Crusade.)
    Fill up the blank and identify the battle.
  • 102. 
  • 103. 3
    Cervantes.
    Battle of Lepanto (1571)—the last major naval battle fought almost entirely between oar-powered galleys.
  • 104. 4
    Discovered by 2 workers from the frozen ground beneath a hut at Cape Royds in 2006, they were thawed under precise laboratory conditions in New Zealand. In January 2011, Richard Paterson and Vijay Mallya flew there on Mallya’s private jet to pick these up. The cargo hold of a commercial plane would not have been able to provide the proper conditions for the safety and conservation of these precious, rare artifacts. Because of the legal limits imposed by airlines, they couldn’t fly in the passenger cabin either. Careful analysis was done and replicas were created each to be sold for about $160. What are we talking about?
  • 105. 
  • 106. 4
    Whisky bottles from Ernest Shackleton’s expedition.
  • 107. 5
    This John J. Graham creation (introduced on May 22, 1956 to replace the Xylophone) was inspired by the increase in colour programming on television. Another reason was that RCA was a leading manufacturer of colour TV sets and it was intended to be a marketing tool prompting people to purchase colour TV sets. What are we talking about?
  • 108. 
  • 109. 5
    NBC’s peacock logo.
  • 110. 6
    What occasional ‘misfortune’ connected people associated with the following?
  • 111. 
  • 112. 6
    Their subjects were occasionally called ‘idiots’.
  • 113. 7
    In the 16th century, wars usually involved brutal hand-to-hand affairs but it was conducted under rules of engagement that seem now somewhat quaint. These were laid out in some detail by the British Army’s Rules and Ordynaunces for the Warre(1554) and Robert Barrett’s Theorikeand Practice of ModerneWarres (1598). At sunset, all hostilities ceased and the soldiery went back to their camps to bed. What name was given to the signalling of this done using drums or similar instruments?
  • 114. 
  • 115. 7
    Beating the Retreat.
  • 116. 8
    Cracking this nut takes about 300 lb/sq.inch (21 kg/sq.cm.) of pressure, which is roughly equivalent to 6 elephants standing on top of you. The only species in the animal kingdom (other than man) that crack them for food is shown here. Both share the first 4 letters in their names. Identify both.
  • 117. 
  • 118. 8
    Macadamia nuts and Macaw (Hyacinth Macaw).
  • 119. 9
    Close-up of which humongous trophy? (Specific name please, not the name of the event). Why is the trophy usually photographed only from a few angles?

  • 120. 9
  • 121. 
  • 122. 9
    Borg-Warner Trophy, named for United States automotive supplier BorgWarner, is symbolic of victory in the Indianapolis 500.
    On the top of the trophy is a man waving a checkered flag. Because this man is depicted naked, after the tradition of ancient Greek athletes, the trophy is most often photographed so that the man’s arm is swooping down in front of him.
  • 123. 10
    Vägmärken(Markings) was written by X and published in 1963. It is highly regarded as a classic of contemporary spiritual literature—a collection of X’s diary reflections, the book starts in 1925, when he was 20 years old and ends at his death in 1961. It was translated into English by Leif Sjöberg and refined by Y, who also wrote a foreword. X’s countrymen found numerous shortcomings with the translation—a New York TimesBook Review credited Y with rendering X ’s thoughts in “pellucid English”. Identify X and Y.
  • 124. 
  • 125. 10
    X Dag Hammarskjöld
    Y W.H. Auden
    Bonus 
  • 126. B
    The numerous shortcomings in the above-mentioned translation is believed to be the main reason for what?
  • 127. 
  • 128. B
    The reason for Auden being not awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.
  • 129. 11
    The transliteration of the local name would be HaKotelHaMa’aravi. The name Mur des Lamentations was used in French, el-Mabka in Arabic and Klagemauerin German. What are we talking about?
  • 130. 
  • 131. 11
    Wailing Wall in Jerusalem.
    Bonus 
  • 132. B
    What reason is attributed to the emotion commonly associated with the above-mentioned place?
  • 133. 
  • 134. B
    The mourning for the destruction of the Temple.
  • 135. 12
    It began life as a wallpaper cleaner used to clean soot off of walls. But when people switched from using coal burning furnaces to oil fueled ones in the ‘40s and ‘50s, demand for the product evaporated. Kutol, a manufacturing company in Cincinnati, was watching their sales dwindle when the son of its founder, Joe McVicker, repackaged it as a fun product at the suggestion of his sister-in-law Kay Zufall. What are we talking about?
  • 136. 
  • 137. 12
    Play-Doh.
  • 138. 13
    Photo of a hotel in Brussels that opened in 2010 and is a big tourist attraction. What’s its name?
  • 139. 
  • 140. 13
    Hotel Pantone.
  • 141. 14
    The most significant ‘outcome’ of the Hampton Court Conference in January 1604 celebrates its 400th anniversary this year. The Shakespeare’s Globe theatre marked the anniversary by a week-long complete recital. The Royal Shakespeare Company commissioned a new play, Written on the Heart, dealing with it, to premiere in October 2011. What are we talking about?
  • 142. 
  • 143. 14
    The King James Version of the Bible.
  • 144. 15
    This work perennially figures in the list of Britain’s favouritepieces of classical music. This year it topped the list in a BBC survey. Identify the composer. By what name, popular by association, is it known?
  • 145. 
  • 146. 15
    Rachmaninov.
    Brief Encounter theme (Piano concerto No.2).
  • 147. 16
    (A) And (B) are trophies awarded for the World team championships in contract bridge held every 2 years. (A) is open to both genders while (B) is for women players only. What is special about the names given to the trophies?
  • 148. 
  • 149. 16
    Both are named after the first venues—Bermuda Bowl and Venice Cup.
  • 150. .
    Finis