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Neer Core Services & Cloud Computing V4.5

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MG Stephen Gross (USAFR) NEER IPT Chair Deputy Director Deloitte & Touche Center for Cyber Innovation Using a Cloud Computing Model to Establish Net-Enabled Emergency Response (NEER) Core Services

MG Stephen Gross (USAFR) NEER IPT Chair Deputy Director Deloitte & Touche Center for Cyber Innovation Using a Cloud Computing Model to Establish Net-Enabled Emergency Response (NEER) Core Services

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  • 1. Using a Cloud Computing Model to Establish Net-Enabled Emergency Response (NEER) Core Services NCOIC Cloud Computing Workshop September 21, 2009 presented by MG Stephen Gross USAFR NEER IPT Chair Deputy Director Deloitte & Touche Center for Cyber Innovation
  • 2. Recommendations for effectively establishing NEER core services  We will begin with our concluding recommendations  Produce operational, capability and technical patterns for a network-of-networks based on nationally defined, locally implemented cloud computing storefronts hosting NEER core services interfaced to local mesh networks – Subscribe and Publish architecture • Information is both “pushed” AHAW Logistics and “pulled” alerts Digital Geo- Rights – Get the right information Spatial SECURE, Management CLOUD-BASED to the right people Data DISTRIBUTED at the right time STOREFRONTS Shared up and down all for NETWORK CENTRIC OPERATIONS chains of command SUPPORTING PUBLIC SAFETY Directories Identity and EMERGENCY RESPONSE CORE SERVICES – Focus on responder Management Access communities Mesh Control Networks – Focus on victims Integration Broadband Backbones – “Everything Over IP” Mobile is fundamental Responders Fixed – Security as required Agencies at all levels 2
  • 3. Challenges to effectively establishing NEER core services  Balkanized control of emergency IT – 120,000 ER jurisdictions in the Public Safety/Emergency Responder US alone, mostly small COI (Non-Military) in the USA* – Nearly as many in the EU/NATO/ allied European countries 20000 18000  Lack of coordinated national, 16000 EOCs provincial/state leadership Urgent Care 14000  Stove pipe agency consumer 12000 Hospitals solutions PSAPs 10000 – Dominance by vendors; land Public Health 8000 EMS mobile radios prevalent 6000 Fire  >$100 Billion in legacy systems 4000 Law rarely designed to interoperate 2000 – >$1 Trillion worldwide 0  Lack of widely available broadband Number of Agencies infrastructure for emergency Source: and responder COI 3
  • 4. Challenges to effectively establishing NEER core services (continued)  Wisconsin State Patrol Chairman Casey Perry attributed a great deal of his problems to squabbles among states, counties and municipalities. He said more federal grant money needs to be conditional to hold state and local governments accountable for creating interoperable networks  "Each entity resists losing their share of control," Perry said. "This is the underlying root of the problems we face today." 4
  • 5. Common requirements from multiple COI not being effectively addressed today  Standardized communications from and to any device, source  Intelligence about people – Responders and victims – Secure when necessary  Access to special resources – People, e.g., interpreters, neurosurgeons, mental health professionals, officials, telecomm manager – Things, e.g., hospital beds, specialized vehicles, shelters, bulldozers, ambulances, generators, cell sites – Decision Support, e.g., predictive algorithms, geospatial information, protocols, incident map, matching people to shelters, directories  Effectively addressing these requirements will require a national establishment of NEER core services implemented nationally, regionally and locally 5
  • 6. What are NEER core services?  NEER core services are those services necessary for full information interoperability of the emergency responder communities of interest for both day-to-day operations and for response to complex humanitarian disasters 6
  • 7. Agency locator  Registration of all responders – Identify who each emergency responder is – Identify each emergency responder’s organization – Describe organization type • role-based access – Define the incident types about which each responder needs to be alerted • Jurisdiction based and/or geographically based • Help needed/wanted • Just interested – Define in advance where and to what devices each responder wants calls and data sent – Define in advance each responder’s radio frequencies, gateways, CODECs, etc 7
  • 8. Identity management and access control  Identify each information recipient – Individual user and/or organization  How is each recipient represented (Identifiers) – Username, Log-in (Password, PINs, Smartcards, Biometrics, etc  Define how each recipient is to be authenticated – Validation of identifiers  Describe what each recipient can do when authenticated (Authorization) – What functions can be performed – What data can be accessed – Role-based – tied to identifiers – user and organization  Define how each recipient will know the information exchange is working properly (Auditing) 8
  • 9. Digital rights management  Classification of data – By data element, data segment, entire record  Granting of access rights (informed consent) – Permissions - what grantee is allowed to do by action (access, print, update, change, distribute, etc.) – Constraints - restrictions on the permissions (i.e. cannot redistribute, access granted only if tied to an emergency, etc.) – Obligations - what grantee has to do/provide/accept – Rights Holders - who is entitled to what 9
  • 10. All hazards – all warnings (AHAW) alerting  Provide a practical, pragmatic methodology for efficient and timely generation, authentication or confirmation and distribution of emergency alerts and warnings – Nationally mandated, integrated at the regional, state and local levels – Based on the latest version of the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) Standard from the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) – Positions the use of CAP in a global system of systems, network of networks, using a SOA which will be reused in multiple NEER patterns • The SOA which supports this set of patterns is based on the Reference Model for SOA (SOA-RM)[RD/05], an OASIS standard developed by the SOA-Reference Model Technical Committee (SOA- RM TC) approved in March 2005 10
  • 11. Examples of standards required for NEER core services establishment  Examples of NEER core services standards MECI Demo / Sample Architectural Elements (not an exhaustive list) • SIP • Portable WiMax C2 appliances CAP • EDXL-DE, other emerging EDXL standards Cellular Comms Emergency Kit • Directory Services – EPAD Wireless and Terrestrial Systems SATCOM Gateway IP Connectivity (Voice, Video, Data) • Wireless Mesh Networks – 802.11, 802.16 • Wireless Local Area Networks (LAN) – 802.11 Broken Links • Connectionless Networking – IPv6 Restored link IP Back-bone Software Defined Radio JTRS • Connectionless Transport – UDP Sub-nets • Connection-Oriented Transport – TCP, SCTP • 3G cellular, both UMTS and CDMA2000 • Communications Security – IPSec, TLS, SCIP • Satellite Communications – L band, Ku band 11
  • 12. Recommendations for effectively establishing NEER core services  Produce operational, capability and technical patterns for a network-of-networks based on nationally defined, locally implemented cloud computing storefronts hosting NEER core services interfaced to local mesh networks – Subscribe and Publish architecture • Information is both “pushed” Logistics and “pulled” AHAW alerts Digital – Get the right information Geo- Rights to the right people Spatial SECURE Management CLOUD-BASED at the right time Data DISTRIBUTED up and down all STOREFRONTS Shared for NETWORK CENTRIC OPERATIONS chains of command SUPPORTING PUBLIC SAFETY Directories – Focus on responder Identity and EMERGENCY RESPONSE CORE SERVICES communities Management Access Mesh – Focus on victims Networks Control Broadband – “Everything Over IP” Integration Backbones is fundamental Mobile – Security as required Responders Fixed at all levels Agencies 12
  • 13. NEER core services reference model  Information  Services – Facilitate knowledge – Enable KD&D through an discovery and display (KD&D) open standards based service by making information from oriented architecture that is all core services storefronts • Secure as needed • Accessible • Highly scalable • Understandable KD&D CORE SERVICES • Highly distributed • Trustable • >99.9% available AGENCY LOCATOR • Interoperable – No single points of failure • Manageable • Decentralized for administration IDENTITY MANAGEMENT RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS ALL HAZARDS ALL WARNINGS CLOUD STOREFRONTS STANDARDS TRUSTED NETWORKS 13
  • 14. NEER Contacts  Please direct all inquiries regarding the NCOIC Net-Enabled Emergency Response initiative to: – Stephen Gross NEER IPT Chair +1.202.879.5678 stgross@deloitte.com Please copy: – Paul Mangione, Senior Technical Staff +1.253.839.3395 paul.mangione@ncoic.org 14