28/03/14 pag. 1
Information visualization lecture 6
case studies
Katrien Verbert
Department of Computer Science
Faculty of...
28/03/14 pag. 2
Case study 1: small interactive calendars
28/03/14 pag. 3
DateLens
28/03/14 pag. 4
design philosophy
… much of the groundwork for this design was laid by earlier work
… while individual fea...
28/03/14 pag. 5
11Sun
12 Mon
13 Tue
14 Wed
15 Thur
16 Fri
17Sat
Fly LA
Kathy to airport Model Maker
Check slides, notes.
F...
28/03/14 pag. 6
9 - 10
1 - 4
15
Thu
15
Thu
16
Fri
8 - 9
9 - 10
12 - 1
3 - 4
Conference trip/who ?
Lecture EE 2.23
Rudzinsk...
28/03/14 pag. 7
maximise!maximise!maximise!
minimise! minimise! minimise!
tap!
Tiny view! Agenda view! Full Day view!
Appo...
28/03/14 pag. 8
Movement
of the
lower
scrollbar
thumb
controls
the range
of days
displayed
Use of the scrollbar thumb cont...
28/03/14 pag. 9
Search
28/03/14 pag. 10
28/03/14 pag. 11
Usability study
•  6 male and 5 female subjects
•  Each subject performed 11 tasks with the interface
•  ...
28/03/14 pag. 12
Observations
•  performance measures:
–  	
  <me	
  needed	
  to	
  complete	
  task	
  
–  Success	
  in...
28/03/14 pag. 13
Average task completion times for the two calendars
28/03/14 pag. 14
Task success
The percentage of tasks completed by participants for each task
(blue = datelens, red = Pock...
28/03/14 pag. 15
Usability
•  Several usability issues:
–  Default	
  day	
  view	
  from	
  9am	
  to	
  5pm	
  
–  Stron...
28/03/14 pag. 16
“Achieving positive results for first-time users of novel
visualization systems is rare” (Kent Wittenburg)
28/03/14 pag. 17
references
•  Bederson, B., Clamage, A., Czerwinski, M., Robertson, G.
(May 2002) DateLens: A Fisheye Cal...
28/03/14 pag. 18
case study 2:
web browsing through a keyhole
28/03/14 pag. 19
Seeking news
28/03/14 pag. 20
Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong
removal of graphic content to provide a complete menu...
28/03/14 pag. 21
The sequential presentation of link previews, each
occupying the full available display area
28/03/14 pag. 22
The sequential presentation of link previews, each
occupying the full available display area
28/03/14 pag. 23
Schematic diagram of the
operation of the RSVP Browser
28/03/14 pag. 24
Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong
Link preview and associated news item
28/03/14 pag. 25
Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong
RSVP-Browser
itv
NEWS
History-bar
Link-bar
Main viewi...
28/03/14 pag. 26
Navigational controls of the RSVP Browser
28/03/14 pag. 27
Evaluation
•  Comparative study with pocket version of Internet Explorer
•  30 subjects:
–  15	
  subject...
28/03/14 pag. 28
Advice available to subjects taking part in the experimental evaluation of the
RSVP Browser
Q1	
   Q2 to ...
28/03/14 pag. 29
The average times needed to answer questions 1, 7 and 8 for subjects using the RSVP
Browser compared with...
28/03/14 pag. 30
The mean number of extra (unnecessary) steps taken by subjects in finding the
answers to questions 1, 7 a...
28/03/14 pag. 31Satisfactory Fast Too fastSlowToo slow
19
9
2
Subjects’ perception of the speed of the RSVP presentation
28/03/14 pag. 32
Discussion
•  Initially disadvantage because of unfamiliarity
•  Initial disadvantage disappeared
•  Adva...
28/03/14 pag. 33
Reference
de Bruijn, O., & Tong, C. H. (2004). M-RSVP: Mobile Web
browsing on a PDA. In People and Comput...
28/03/14 pag. 34
Case study 3:
archival galaxies
28/03/14 pag. 35
InfoSky
•  Designed to explore or search large collections of documents
–  personal	
  collec<ons	
  	
  ...
28/03/14 pag. 36
A landscape representation of data about a collection of documents
Queries
Haptic
Navigation
Video
Intera...
28/03/14 pag. 37A themescape representation of 700 articles related to the financial industry
Earlier work: SPIRE
28/03/14 pag. 38
Earlier work: hyperbolic browser
28/03/14 pag. 39
h"p://portal.mace-­‐project.eu	
  
	
  
28/03/14 pag. 40
The cone tree, tilted to allow the text associated with each node to be readable.
Selective distortion co...
28/03/14 pag. 41View of the entire Galaxy, showing collection boundaries and titles at the top level
Design decisions
Meta...
Design decisions
28/03/14 pag. 43
View of the sub-collection Bundeslander Deutschlands
Interaction and search
28/03/14 pag. 44
The result of clicking on the title Bayern. The mouse now hovers over Wirtschaftsraum Bayern
Interaction
28/03/14 pag. 45
The result of selecting Wirtschaftsraum Bayern
Interaction
28/03/14 pag. 46
At the lowest level titles are visible
Interaction
28/03/14 pag. 47
Highlighting of both relevant regions and documents follows the entry of a keyword
Search
28/03/14 pag. 48
Representation of collections at two levels of the hierarchy and, for the lower level, the
layout of the ...
28/03/14 pag. 49
Evaluation
•  Evaluated in comparison with
conventional tree viewer
•  Eight subjects divided in two grou...
28/03/14 pag. 50
Reference
Andrews, K., Kienreich, W., Sabol, V., Becker, J., Droschl, G.,
Kappe, F., ... & Tochtermann, K...
28/03/14 pag. 51
Case study 4:
Student Activity Meter (SAM)
28/03/14 pag. 52
Student activity meter
28/03/14 pag. 53
Design Based Research Methodology
•  Rapid prototyping
•  Evaluate Ideas in short iteration cycles of des...
28/03/14 pag. 54
System Usability Scale
h"p://www.measuringusability.com/sus.php	
  
	
  
28/03/14 pag. 55
Desirability toolkit
Benedek,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Miner,	
  T.	
  (2002).	
  Measuring	
  Desirability:	
  New...
28/03/14 pag. 56
Iteration one
•  usability and user satisfaction evaluation
•  12 CS students, using a twitter-based time...
28/03/14 pag. 57
Learnability, errors & efficiency
28/03/14 pag. 58
User satisfaction
•  average SUS score: 73%
28/03/14 pag. 59
User satisfaction
demo-
graphics	

evaluation
goal	

design
changes	

negative	

 positive	

I.	

12 CS
students	

usability,
satisfaction,
...
28/03/14 pag. 61
References
Govaerts, S., Verbert, K., Duval, E., & Pardo, A. (2012, May).
The student activity meter for ...
28/03/14 pag. 62
Case study 5:
TalkExplorer
28/03/14 pag. 63
Recommender systems
63	
  
28/03/14 pag. 64
User-based CF
Sam	
  
Ian	
  
Neil	
  
A	
  
B	
  
C	
  
high	
  correla+on	
  
28/03/14 pag. 65
TalkExplorer
•  Purpose: visualizing recommendations to support
–  explora<on	
  
–  transparency	
  	
  ...
28/03/14 pag. 66
Problem statement
•  Complexity prevents users from comprehending results
–  Trust issues when recommenda...
28/03/14 pag. 67
Approach
•  Using set relevance visualization
–  One dimension of relevance = one set
•  Agent metaphor t...
28/03/14 pag. 68
Conference Navigator
68
28/03/14 pag. 69
TalkExplorer
69	
  
28/03/14 pag. 70
John	
  O'Donovan,	
  Barry	
  Smyth,	
  Brynjar	
  Gretarsson,	
  Svetlin	
  Bostandjiev,	
  and	
  Tobi...
28/03/14 pag. 71
Related work: Smallworlds
Gretarsson, B., O'Donovan, J., Bostandjiev, S., Hall, C. and Höllerer, T. Small...
28/03/14 pag. 72
Related work: TasteWeights
Bostandjiev,	
  S.,	
  O'Donovan,	
  J.	
  and	
  Höllerer,	
  T.	
  TasteWeig...
28/03/14 pag. 73
TalkExplorer
28/03/14 pag. 74
Evaluation
•  Setup
–  supervised user study
–  21 participants at UMAP 2012 and ACM Hypertext 2012 confe...
28/03/14 pag. 75
Evaluation
•  Data collection
–  recordings of voice and screen using camtasia studio
–  system logs
•  M...
28/03/14 pag. 76
Effectiveness
76
28/03/14 pag. 77
Summary results
28/03/14 pag. 78
Post-questionnaire
28/03/14 pag. 79
Post-questionnaire
28/03/14 pag. 80
Reference
Verbert, K., Parra, D., Brusilovsky, P. and Duval, E. Visualizing
recommendations to support ex...
28/03/14 pag. 81
Questions?
28/03/14 pag. 82
Readings
•  Chapter 6
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Information visualization: case studies

  1. 1. 28/03/14 pag. 1 Information visualization lecture 6 case studies Katrien Verbert Department of Computer Science Faculty of Science Vrije Universiteit Brussel katrien.verbert@vub.ac.be
  2. 2. 28/03/14 pag. 2 Case study 1: small interactive calendars
  3. 3. 28/03/14 pag. 3 DateLens
  4. 4. 28/03/14 pag. 4 design philosophy … much of the groundwork for this design was laid by earlier work … while individual features of FishCal [=DateLens] represent only variations of existing approaches, the primary contribution here is the integration of a host of techniques to create a novel application that is both usable and useful in an important domain.
  5. 5. 28/03/14 pag. 5 11Sun 12 Mon 13 Tue 14 Wed 15 Thur 16 Fri 17Sat Fly LA Kathy to airport Model Maker Check slides, notes. Family barbeque Fly LHR Kathy to collect Chapter 2/ see Dave March JulyJuneMayAprilMar Aug Sept Oct Flight to SFO Tutorial set-up Tutorial United flight Heathrow Pointer Color OHs Jane+John Call Kathy Background: the first bifocal calendar (1980)
  6. 6. 28/03/14 pag. 6 9 - 10 1 - 4 15 Thu 15 Thu 16 Fri 8 - 9 9 - 10 12 - 1 3 - 4 Conference trip/who ? Lecture EE 2.23 Rudzinski visit Promotions discuss Clinic Optimisation prt alarm 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Mon Mon Mon Mon Tue Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Thu Fri Fri Fri Fri Sat Sat Sat Sat Sun Sun Sun Sun Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun 19 Mon Sun 25 Sun 4 Sun 11 Sun 18 Sun 25Sat 17 Sun 18 Wed 14 Tue 13 Mon 12 FEBRUARY MARCH Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Align ICON Tue 16 Fri 8 - 9 9 - 10 12 - 1 3 - 4 Conference trip/who ? Lecture EE 2.23 Rudzinski visit Promotions discuss Clinic Optimisation prt alarm 15 Thu Meet RCA group/merge Ph.JB/RA + BTG/sg Accounts MoD Section meeting Check finance DD Tutorial 9 - 10 1 - 4 alarm prt (a) (b) The tectonic calendar. (a) Successive suppression of detail by masking; (b) the resulting tectonic calendar
  7. 7. 28/03/14 pag. 7 maximise!maximise!maximise! minimise! minimise! minimise! tap! Tiny view! Agenda view! Full Day view! Appointment! detail! The four views offered, and some of the interactions involved in transitions between them
  8. 8. 28/03/14 pag. 8 Movement of the lower scrollbar thumb controls the range of days displayed Use of the scrollbar thumb control to adjust the visible time span h"p://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/datelens/    
  9. 9. 28/03/14 pag. 9 Search
  10. 10. 28/03/14 pag. 10
  11. 11. 28/03/14 pag. 11 Usability study •  6 male and 5 female subjects •  Each subject performed 11 tasks with the interface •  Limit of two minutes to complete each task •  Typical tasks: –  Find  the  date  of  a  specific  calendar  event   –  Find  how  many  Mondays  a  par<cular  month  contains   –  View  all  birthdays  for  the  next  three  months   –  Find  free  <me  to  schedule  an  event  
  12. 12. 28/03/14 pag. 12 Observations •  performance measures: –   <me  needed  to  complete  task   –  Success  in  comple<ng  a  task   •  User satisfaction and preference – by quantitative value (1=very difficult, 5 = very easy)
  13. 13. 28/03/14 pag. 13 Average task completion times for the two calendars
  14. 14. 28/03/14 pag. 14 Task success The percentage of tasks completed by participants for each task (blue = datelens, red = Pocket PC) avg datelens: 88.2%, avg pocket pc: 76.3% 100 80 60 40 20 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Task Average Percent Completed
  15. 15. 28/03/14 pag. 15 Usability •  Several usability issues: –  Default  day  view  from  9am  to  5pm   –  Strong  concerns  about  readability  of  text   –  Desirability  of  seFng  own  default  views   •  6 out of 11 users preferred traditional calendar •  1 subject abstained •  4 subjects preferred datelens
  16. 16. 28/03/14 pag. 16 “Achieving positive results for first-time users of novel visualization systems is rare” (Kent Wittenburg)
  17. 17. 28/03/14 pag. 17 references •  Bederson, B., Clamage, A., Czerwinski, M., Robertson, G. (May 2002) DateLens: A Fisheye Calendar Interface for PDAs. Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction [ Published Version] •  Bederson, B. B., Clamage, A., Czerwinski, M. P., & Robertson, G. G. (2003, April). A fisheye calendar interface for PDAs: Providing overviews for small displays. In CHI'03 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (pp. 618-619). ACM.
  18. 18. 28/03/14 pag. 18 case study 2: web browsing through a keyhole
  19. 19. 28/03/14 pag. 19 Seeking news
  20. 20. 28/03/14 pag. 20 Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong removal of graphic content to provide a complete menu in the display area, without the need for scrolling
  21. 21. 28/03/14 pag. 21 The sequential presentation of link previews, each occupying the full available display area
  22. 22. 28/03/14 pag. 22 The sequential presentation of link previews, each occupying the full available display area
  23. 23. 28/03/14 pag. 23 Schematic diagram of the operation of the RSVP Browser
  24. 24. 28/03/14 pag. 24 Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong Link preview and associated news item
  25. 25. 28/03/14 pag. 25 Source: Courtesy Oscar de Bruijn and Chieh Hao Tong RSVP-Browser itv NEWS History-bar Link-bar Main viewing area Info-bar 1 System design
  26. 26. 28/03/14 pag. 26 Navigational controls of the RSVP Browser
  27. 27. 28/03/14 pag. 27 Evaluation •  Comparative study with pocket version of Internet Explorer •  30 subjects: –  15  subjects  used  RSVP  browser   –  15  subjects  used  Pocket  IE   •  Tasks: each subject answered 8 questions •  Example:   The  cross-­‐border  train  between  Belfast  and  Dublin  has  been  closed  aPer   several  explora<ons  were  heard  near  the  line.  Has  the  cause  of  these   explosions  been  iden<fied?     •  Data acquisition –   video  recordings     –   preferences  expressed  by  users  
  28. 28. 28/03/14 pag. 28 Advice available to subjects taking part in the experimental evaluation of the RSVP Browser Q1   Q2 to Q6   Q7 and Q8   No instruction   given   Subject could ask   experimenter for advice   No advice available to   subject   Procedure
  29. 29. 28/03/14 pag. 29 The average times needed to answer questions 1, 7 and 8 for subjects using the RSVP Browser compared with Pocket IE 100 24 2522 24 25 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1 7 8 Question Time(seconds) RSVP-Browser Pocket IE Time to solution
  30. 30. 28/03/14 pag. 30 The mean number of extra (unnecessary) steps taken by subjects in finding the answers to questions 1, 7 and 8 using either the RSVP Browser or Pocket IE 1.7 0.4 0.40.3 0.8 0.4 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 7 8 Question Extrasteps RSVP-Browser Pocket IE Number of steps
  31. 31. 28/03/14 pag. 31Satisfactory Fast Too fastSlowToo slow 19 9 2 Subjects’ perception of the speed of the RSVP presentation
  32. 32. 28/03/14 pag. 32 Discussion •  Initially disadvantage because of unfamiliarity •  Initial disadvantage disappeared •  Advantages: –  Reduc<on  of  efforts  to  scroll     –  Li"le  training  required   •  Debate about best approach •  Many open questions •  But viable alternative
  33. 33. 28/03/14 pag. 33 Reference de Bruijn, O., & Tong, C. H. (2004). M-RSVP: Mobile Web browsing on a PDA. In People and Computers XVII—Designing for Society (pp. 297-311). Springer London.
  34. 34. 28/03/14 pag. 34 Case study 3: archival galaxies
  35. 35. 28/03/14 pag. 35 InfoSky •  Designed to explore or search large collections of documents –  personal  collec<ons     –  collec<ons  maintained  by  news  organiza<ons   •  Attention to value of algorithms to organize data spatially •  Case study: 109.000 news articles – organized in hierarchy •  Requirements: –  Scalability   –  Hierarchy  plus  similarity   –  Focus+context   –  Stability   –  Explora<on  
  36. 36. 28/03/14 pag. 36 A landscape representation of data about a collection of documents Queries Haptic Navigation Video Interaction Cognition Earlier work: BEAD
  37. 37. 28/03/14 pag. 37A themescape representation of 700 articles related to the financial industry Earlier work: SPIRE
  38. 38. 28/03/14 pag. 38 Earlier work: hyperbolic browser
  39. 39. 28/03/14 pag. 39 h"p://portal.mace-­‐project.eu    
  40. 40. 28/03/14 pag. 40 The cone tree, tilted to allow the text associated with each node to be readable. Selective distortion could be applied to allow focus on any part Earlier work: cone tree
  41. 41. 28/03/14 pag. 41View of the entire Galaxy, showing collection boundaries and titles at the top level Design decisions Metaphors   •  Galaxy  of  stars      …  to  represent  repository   •  Telescope      …  to  support  seman<c  zoom  
  42. 42. Design decisions
  43. 43. 28/03/14 pag. 43 View of the sub-collection Bundeslander Deutschlands Interaction and search
  44. 44. 28/03/14 pag. 44 The result of clicking on the title Bayern. The mouse now hovers over Wirtschaftsraum Bayern Interaction
  45. 45. 28/03/14 pag. 45 The result of selecting Wirtschaftsraum Bayern Interaction
  46. 46. 28/03/14 pag. 46 At the lowest level titles are visible Interaction
  47. 47. 28/03/14 pag. 47 Highlighting of both relevant regions and documents follows the entry of a keyword Search
  48. 48. 28/03/14 pag. 48 Representation of collections at two levels of the hierarchy and, for the lower level, the layout of the collections (A, B, C, etc.) and their centroids (C1, C2, C3) Layout
  49. 49. 28/03/14 pag. 49 Evaluation •  Evaluated in comparison with conventional tree viewer •  Eight subjects divided in two groups –  First  group  used  InfoSky  first,  then  tree  viewer   –  Second  group  vice  versa   •  Five tasks •  Video recording and interview •  Time recorded •  On average tree performed sign. better •  Potential reasons: –  Many    hours  of  experience  with  tree   –  Early  stage  of  development  
  50. 50. 28/03/14 pag. 50 Reference Andrews, K., Kienreich, W., Sabol, V., Becker, J., Droschl, G., Kappe, F., ... & Tochtermann, K. (2002). The infosky visual explorer: exploiting hierarchical structure and document similarities. Information Visualization, 1(3-4), 166-181.
  51. 51. 28/03/14 pag. 51 Case study 4: Student Activity Meter (SAM)
  52. 52. 28/03/14 pag. 52 Student activity meter
  53. 53. 28/03/14 pag. 53 Design Based Research Methodology •  Rapid prototyping •  Evaluate Ideas in short iteration cycles of design, implementation & evaluation •  Focus on usefulness & usability –  Think-aloud evaluations –  User satisfaction (SUS, desirability toolkit)
  54. 54. 28/03/14 pag. 54 System Usability Scale h"p://www.measuringusability.com/sus.php    
  55. 55. 28/03/14 pag. 55 Desirability toolkit Benedek,  J.,  &  Miner,  T.  (2002).  Measuring  Desirability:  New  methods  for  evalua<ng  desirability   in  a  usability  lab  seFng.  Proceedings  of  Usability  Professionals  Associa<on,  2003,  8-­‐12.    
  56. 56. 28/03/14 pag. 56 Iteration one •  usability and user satisfaction evaluation •  12 CS students, using a twitter-based time tracker •  2 evaluation sessions: –  task based interview with think aloud (after 1 week of tracking) –  user satisfaction (after 1 month)
  57. 57. 28/03/14 pag. 57 Learnability, errors & efficiency
  58. 58. 28/03/14 pag. 58 User satisfaction •  average SUS score: 73%
  59. 59. 28/03/14 pag. 59 User satisfaction
  60. 60. demo- graphics evaluation goal design changes negative positive I. 12 CS students usability, satisfaction, preliminary usefulness 1st iteration small usability issues • ↑learnability • ↓errors • good satisfaction • usefulness positive II. 19 teachers &TA s assessing teacher needs, use & usefulness help function resource recomm. not useful • provides awareness • all vis. useful • many uses • 90% want it III. 12 participan ts assessing teacher needs, expert feedback, use & usefulness re-orderable PC with histograms most addressed needs are indecisive • provides awareness and feedback • many uses • 66% want it • recomm. can be useful IV. 11 teachers &TA s use, usefulness & satisfaction filter & search, icons, zooming in line chart, editing PC axes conflicting visions of students doing well or at risk • provides time overview • provides course overview • PC assist with detecting problems • many uses & insights • 100% want it
  61. 61. 28/03/14 pag. 61 References Govaerts, S., Verbert, K., Duval, E., & Pardo, A. (2012, May). The student activity meter for awareness and self-reflection. In CHI'12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 869-884). ACM.
  62. 62. 28/03/14 pag. 62 Case study 5: TalkExplorer
  63. 63. 28/03/14 pag. 63 Recommender systems 63  
  64. 64. 28/03/14 pag. 64 User-based CF Sam   Ian   Neil   A   B   C   high  correla+on  
  65. 65. 28/03/14 pag. 65 TalkExplorer •  Purpose: visualizing recommendations to support –  explora<on   –  transparency     –  controllability   •  Context: academic conferences
  66. 66. 28/03/14 pag. 66 Problem statement •  Complexity prevents users from comprehending results –  Trust issues when recommendations fail –  Aggravated with contextual recommendation •  The black box nature of RS prevents users from providing feedback •  Algorithms typically hard-wired in the system code –  generate a list of top-N recommendations –  little research has been done to study more flexible approaches 66  
  67. 67. 28/03/14 pag. 67 Approach •  Using set relevance visualization –  One dimension of relevance = one set •  Agent metaphor to mix user- tag- and engine-based relevance –  recommender systems are shown as agents –  in parallel to real users collecting talks –  tags are also agents collecting talks –  users can interrelate entities to find items
  68. 68. 28/03/14 pag. 68 Conference Navigator 68
  69. 69. 28/03/14 pag. 69 TalkExplorer 69  
  70. 70. 28/03/14 pag. 70 John  O'Donovan,  Barry  Smyth,  Brynjar  Gretarsson,  Svetlin  Bostandjiev,  and  Tobias  Höllerer.  2008.  PeerChooser:  visual  interac<ve   recommenda<on.  CHI  '08   Related work: PeerChooser
  71. 71. 28/03/14 pag. 71 Related work: Smallworlds Gretarsson, B., O'Donovan, J., Bostandjiev, S., Hall, C. and Höllerer, T. SmallWorlds: Visualizing Social Recommendations. Comput. Graph. Forum, 29, 3 (2010), 833-842.
  72. 72. 28/03/14 pag. 72 Related work: TasteWeights Bostandjiev,  S.,  O'Donovan,  J.  and  Höllerer,  T.  TasteWeights:  a  visual  interac<ve  hybrid  recommender  system.  In  Proceedings  of  the  sixth  ACM  conference  on   Recommender  systems  (RecSys  '12).  ACM,  New  York,  NY,  USA  (2012),  35-­‐42.    
  73. 73. 28/03/14 pag. 73 TalkExplorer
  74. 74. 28/03/14 pag. 74 Evaluation •  Setup –  supervised user study –  21 participants at UMAP 2012 and ACM Hypertext 2012 conferences •  Procedure –  Tasks •  interact with users and their bookmarks •  interact with agents •  interact with tags –  Post-questionnaire 74
  75. 75. 28/03/14 pag. 75 Evaluation •  Data collection –  recordings of voice and screen using camtasia studio –  system logs •  Measurements –  effectiveness: number of explorations/number of selections
  76. 76. 28/03/14 pag. 76 Effectiveness 76
  77. 77. 28/03/14 pag. 77 Summary results
  78. 78. 28/03/14 pag. 78 Post-questionnaire
  79. 79. 28/03/14 pag. 79 Post-questionnaire
  80. 80. 28/03/14 pag. 80 Reference Verbert, K., Parra, D., Brusilovsky, P. and Duval, E. Visualizing recommendations to support exploration, transparency and controllability. In Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’13), IUI’13, pages 1-12, New York, NY, USA, 2013. ACM
  81. 81. 28/03/14 pag. 81 Questions?
  82. 82. 28/03/14 pag. 82 Readings •  Chapter 6
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