PD 102- Chapter 2<br />Persist <br />
What You Need to Know UP Front<br />Self management is about investigating and researching ways to be successful at your c...
What You Need to Know UP Front <br />Professors are granted something called academic freedom <br />Academic freedom means...
What to do when a professor doesn’t speak English well: <br />1) Sit near the front of the room<br />2) Watch the professo...
Classroom Etiquette & Personal Decorum <br />Bring your materials to class daily<br />Come prepared<br />Turn in papers, p...
Classroom Etiquette & Personal Decorum (cont’d) <br />Wait for the professor to dismiss class before you begin to pack you...
The Academic Advisor/Counselor <br />Your advisor will help you select courses for the completion of your degree<br />Acad...
Transfer Issues<br />Most colleges will not accept grades below a C from another institution<br />Your future college does...
Transfer Issues<br />Each A earned is worth 4 quality points, B worth 3 quality points,  C worth 2 quality points, D worth...
Online Classes<br />Most online classes allow you to work at your own pace, but most still have stringent deadlines for su...
Online Classes (cont’d)<br />When taking an online class, review the course material before you register (helps you make t...
Protecting Yourself On Campus <br />Walk in groups at night or in poorly lit places<br />Don’t bring valuables to campus<b...
Practicing Fiscal Fitness <br />Are you managing your money or is it managing you?<br />
The Secret World of Financial Aid<br />Federal financial aid includes federal and student loans, federal and state grants,...
Key Terms<br />COA: cost of attendance; the total amount it will cost you to go to college<br />Co-signer: a person who si...
Types of Federal Financial Aid <br />Pell Grant: need-based grant awarded to qualified undergrads who have not been awarde...
Scholarships <br />Do not miss a deadline<br />Read all instructions before beginning the process<br />Always fill out the...
Student Loans <br />Borrow no more than you absolutely must<br />Try not to borrow anything but tuition and room and board...
Prioritizing Your Finances<br />Borrow no more money than you absolutely have to <br />Keep credit card debt to an absolut...
B is for Budgeting <br />One of the main reasons to budget is to determine the exact amount of money you need to borrow to...
Facts About Credit Cards <br />Credit cards are nothing more than high interest loans<br />Carry only one or two credit ca...
The Pitfalls of Payday Loans, Car Title Loans, and Rent-to-Own Contracts<br />By using rent-to-own companies, you are payi...
Protect Yourself from Identity Theft<br />Never put any personal information in the garbage that has not been shredded<br ...
Next Time…<br />We will discuss Chapters 3 and 4 <br />
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PD 102 Chapter 2 Notes

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PD 102 Chapter 2 Notes

  1. 1. PD 102- Chapter 2<br />Persist <br />
  2. 2. What You Need to Know UP Front<br />Self management is about investigating and researching ways to be successful at your college from this day forward<br />The policies and procedures of colleges vary but it is your responsibility to know what you can expect from your institution and what your institution expects from you; these policies can be found in the college catalog <br />The college professor is charged with much more than classroom instruction (required to do research, write articles and books, attend academic conferences, advise students, and keep current in their ever changing fields of study) <br />Professors are granted something called academic freedom <br />
  3. 3. What You Need to Know UP Front <br />Professors are granted something called academic freedom <br />Academic freedom means that a professor has the right to teach controversial issues, topics, subjects, pieces of literature, scientific theories, religious tenets, and political points of view without the threat of termination<br />The grade given by a professor is seldom changeable<br />If you are truly concerned about your grade, speak to the professor<br />Learn how to accept criticism <br />
  4. 4. What to do when a professor doesn’t speak English well: <br />1) Sit near the front of the room<br />2) Watch the professor’s mouth when you can<br />3) Follow the professor’s non-verbal communication patterns <br />4) Use a tape recorder if allowed<br />5) Read the material beforehand so that you will have a general understanding of what is being discussed<br />6) Ask questions when you do not understand the material <br />What to do when a professor <br />Doesn’t speak English well: <br />
  5. 5. Classroom Etiquette & Personal Decorum <br />Bring your materials to class daily<br />Come prepared<br />Turn in papers, projects and assignments on time<br />Participate in class<br />Visit professors during office hours<br />If you are late for class, enter quietly; don’t walk in front of the professor; don’t let the door slam; don’t talk on your way in; take the seat nearest the door; make every effort not to be late to class <br />
  6. 6. Classroom Etiquette & Personal Decorum (cont’d) <br />Wait for the professor to dismiss class before you begin to pack your bags to leave <br />Never carry on a conversation with another student while the professor or another student is talking<br />Do not sleep in class<br />If for any reason you must leave during class, do so quietly and quickly <br />Turn off your iPod<br />Be respectful of other students; don’t use profanity or obscene language<br />If you act like an adult, you’ll be treated like one<br />Turn off your cell phone or beeper <br />
  7. 7. The Academic Advisor/Counselor <br />Your advisor will help you select courses for the completion of your degree<br />Academic advisors are not psychological counselors; they are assigned to assist students in completing their academic programs of study<br />They may offer advice on personal or career matters, but they are not trained to assist with psychological and emotional matters<br />Locate your advisor as soon as you arrive on campus and introduce yourself<br />Stop by to say hello if you see your advisor in his or her office<br />Call your advisor if you have a problem that can be dealt with over the phone<br />Don’t go to your advisor unprepared <br />
  8. 8. Transfer Issues<br />Most colleges will not accept grades below a C from another institution<br />Your future college does not transfer your GPA<br />You need to speak with an informed, qualified transfer advisor or counselor before registering for any course or degree if you plan to transfer<br />GPA: the numerical grading system used by almost every college in the nation<br />Most colleges operated under a 4.0 system<br />
  9. 9. Transfer Issues<br />Each A earned is worth 4 quality points, B worth 3 quality points, C worth 2 quality points, D worth 1 quality point, and F is worth 0 quality points <br />For each course, the number of quality points earned is multiplied by the number of credit hours carried by the course<br />Lowering a GPA is very easy but raising one is not as easy <br />
  10. 10. Online Classes<br />Most online classes allow you to work at your own pace, but most still have stringent deadlines for submitting assignments <br />Distance-learning courses are usually more difficult for the average student<br />You need to be a self-starter and highly motivated to complete and do well in these courses<br />
  11. 11. Online Classes (cont’d)<br />When taking an online class, review the course material before you register (helps you make the decision whether to take it online or not), begin before the material, make an appointment to meet the professor as soon as possible, develop a schedule for completing each assignment and stick to it, keep a copy of all work mailed, emailed or delivered to the professor, always mail, email or deliver your assignment on time, try to find someone who is registered for the same course so that you can work together or at least have a phone number to call if you run into a problem, take full advantage of any online orientation or training session, participate in class and in your groups, log in every day even if you do not have an assignment due, if you have computer failure, have a backup plan, work ahead if possible, find out where to go or whom to call on campus should you encounter technical problems <br />
  12. 12. Protecting Yourself On Campus <br />Walk in groups at night or in poorly lit places<br />Don’t bring valuables to campus<br />Protect your belongings by taking out a renter’s insurance policy<br />When walking around campus, walk confidently and not like a victim<br />Lock your doors<br />Park in well-lit areas close to buildings<br />Never carry a lot of money with you<br />Never leave your book bag unattended <br />
  13. 13. Practicing Fiscal Fitness <br />Are you managing your money or is it managing you?<br />
  14. 14. The Secret World of Financial Aid<br />Federal financial aid includes federal and student loans, federal and state grants, scholarships (local, regional and national), work-study programs<br />An undergraduate may receive any of these types of assistance, whereas graduate students cannot receive Pell grants or Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity (FSEOGs)<br />Each year, millions of dollars are unclaimed because students do not know about these scholarships or where to find the necessary information <br />
  15. 15. Key Terms<br />COA: cost of attendance; the total amount it will cost you to go to college<br />Co-signer: a person who signs a promissory note and agrees to repay the debt should the borrower default<br />Delinquency: past due payment on a loan<br />Discretionary income: amount of money one has left after all expenses have been paid <br />Debit Card: card that allows purchases to be charged directly to one’s personal bank account <br />Disposable income: money left over after taxes have been deducted<br />Gross income: your income before taxes and deductions<br />Net income: your income after taxes and deductions<br />Payday loans: loans made against one’s next paycheck, usually at a very high rate of interest<br />Payoff: the total amount owed on a loan if you were to pay it off in one lump sum<br />Bankruptcy Chapter 7: allows one’s unprotected assets to be sold and disbursed to creditors; Chapter 13: allows the debtor time to pay debts<br />Financial Terms to Know <br />Financial Terms to Know <br />
  16. 16. Types of Federal Financial Aid <br />Pell Grant: need-based grant awarded to qualified undergrads who have not been awarded a previous degree<br />Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): need-based grant awarded to institutions to allocate to students through their financial aid offices<br />Stafford loans: low-interest, non-subsidized loan; do not have to show need to qualify; you are responsible for the interest on the loan while you are enrolled; you can defer the interest and the payment until six months after you have left school<br />PLUS loan: federally funded, but state administered, low interest loan to qualified parents of students in college<br />Work study: federally funded, need-based program that pays students an hourly wage for working on campus (earn at least minimum wage) <br />
  17. 17. Scholarships <br />Do not miss a deadline<br />Read all instructions before beginning the process<br />Always fill out the application completely and have someone proof your work<br />Never lie about your financial status<br />Begin the application process as soon as possible<br />Talk to the financial aid officers at the institution you will attend<br />Take copies of fliers and brochures that are available from the financial aid office<br />Always apply for admissions as well as financial aid<br />Fill out the FAFSA<br />
  18. 18. Student Loans <br />Borrow no more than you absolutely must<br />Try not to borrow anything but tuition and room and board<br />Get a job, budget, cut out extras, work in the summers, take fewer credits even though it delays graduation- do everything possible not to borrow more money than you must<br />If you have to borrow a great deal of money, ask yourself a few important questions: 1) Am I majoring in a field that is going to pay me enough money to repay these loans and live a desirable lifestyle? 2) Will I ever be able to afford a house? 3) Can I afford to get married and have a family? <br />You will have to repay this money <br />
  19. 19. Prioritizing Your Finances<br />Borrow no more money than you absolutely have to <br />Keep credit card debt to an absolute minimum<br />Your credit score is the single most important factor in determining your approval for a mortgage, car loan, credit card, insurance and so on<br />To fully maximize your financial resources, you need to establish a budget and learn to live within your means<br />
  20. 20. B is for Budgeting <br />One of the main reasons to budget is to determine the exact amount of money you need to borrow to finance your college education<br />Poor planning while in college can easily result in a lower standard of life after you graduate and have to begin paying back enormous loans<br />Deciding how much to borrow will impact your life long after you have completed your degree <br />
  21. 21. Facts About Credit Cards <br />Credit cards are nothing more than high interest loans<br />Carry only one or two credit cards so you can manage your debt and not get in over your head<br />When you accept a card, sign it right away and keep records of your credit card numbers and the phone number to contact in case they are lost or stolen; report lost or stolen cards immediately <br />Avoid credit cards that charge an annual fee<br />Avoid the temptation to charge<br />When you pay off a card, celebrate and don’t use that as a reason to charge again<br />Pay your credit card payment early enough to avoid late charges, which now average $29.84<br />Call the credit card company and negotiate a better rate<br />Ask yourself, “If I can’t pay this credit card in full this month, what is going to change next month?” <br />
  22. 22. The Pitfalls of Payday Loans, Car Title Loans, and Rent-to-Own Contracts<br />By using rent-to-own companies, you are paying double and sometimes triple the actual cost of the item<br />Only borrow money from a reputable bank or credit union <br />Never get involved in a payday loan or car title loan<br />Not only could you lose your car, you can ruin your credit <br />
  23. 23. Protect Yourself from Identity Theft<br />Never put any personal information in the garbage that has not been shredded<br />Buy an inexpensive shredder and use it<br />It is very difficult, if not impossible, to catch identity thefts<br />Order a credit report once a year to be sure you have no major problems <br />
  24. 24. Next Time…<br />We will discuss Chapters 3 and 4 <br />

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