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I Saw in Louisiana a Live Oak Growing - Walt Whitman
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I Saw in Louisiana a Live Oak Growing - Walt Whitman

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Kurt Yun-Doyle & Jessica Lee
Lamar Period 6

Published in: Education, Business

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  • 1. Jessica Lee Kurt Yun-Doyle
  • 2. Walt Whitman 1819-1892 •  wrote “I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing” at about age 40, in the year 1860 •  published in the third edition of Leaves of Grass, Whitman’s only book of poetry that he edited & republished throughout his life •  Whitman worked for 3 months in Louisiana, where he gathered inspiration for his poems
  • 3. I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing, All alone stood it and the moss hung down from the branches, Without any companion it stood there uttering joyous leaves of dark green, And its look, rude, unbending, lusty, made me think of myself, But I wondered how it could utter joyous leaves standing alone there without its friend near, for I knew I could not, And I broke off a twig with a certain number of leaves upon it, and twined around it a little moss,
  • 4. And brought it away, and I have placed it in sight in my room, It is not needed to remind me as of my own dear friends, (For I believe lately I think of little else than of them,) Yet it remains to me a curious token, it makes me think of manly love; For all that, and though the live-oak glistens there in Louisiana solitary in a wide flat space, Uttering joyous leaves all its life without a friend or lover near, I know very well I could not.
  • 5. The poem contrasts the tree and the speaker and their needs for compassion and friendship, revealing that:
  • 6. ~THEME~
  • 7. I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing Stylistic Language Tone Tone Tone Devices
  • 8. Language •  simple diction - “And I broke off a twig with a certain number of leaves…” [6] •  everyday language •  powerful adjectives - “…rude, unbending, lusty…” [4] - “…joyous leaves of dark green” [3]
  • 9. Tone •  calm •  thoughtful - “…it makes me think of manly love;” •  awestruck - “But I wondered how it could utter joyous leaves…” [5] •  reminiscent - “…remind me as of my own dear friends,” [8]
  • 10. Stylistic Devices •  strong imagery - “All alone stood it and the moss hung down from the branches,” •  multiple uses of personification - “…it could utter joyous leaves standing alone there without its friend near…” [5] - “And its look, rude, unbending, lusty…” [4] •  reversed word order - “All alone stood it…” [2]