Greek Columns ~ Development & Use

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  • There are three orders
  • Greek Columns ~ Development & Use

    1. 1. The Greek columnsDevelopment & Use<br />Kathryn Ursenbach<br />Humanities 101<br />
    2. 2. There are three different styles (also called Orders) of Greek architecture:<br />Doric<br />Ionic<br />Corinthian<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. THE Doric COLUMN<br /><ul><li>Developed around the 6th century B.C.
    5. 5. Used in Greece until about 100 BC
    6. 6. No Base
    7. 7. Shaft is wider at the bottom
    8. 8. Shaft has 20 flutes
    9. 9. Smooth, round capitals (tops)
    10. 10. No carvings or other ornaments</li></ul> The Doric column is oftentimes associated with strength and masculinity. <br />
    11. 11. The Parthenon Temple<br />
    12. 12. THE IONIC COLUMN<br /><ul><li> First used in the mid-6th century BC
    13. 13. Stands on a base of stacked disks
    14. 14. Shafts are usually fluted, but can be plain
    15. 15. A pair of volutes (scroll-shaped ornaments) decorates the capital</li></ul>Roman historian Vitruvius compared this delicate order to a female form, in contrast to the stockier "male" Doric order.<br />
    16. 16. The Temple of <br />Athena Nike <br />in Athens, Greece<br />
    17. 17. THE Corinthian COLUMN<br /><ul><li> Probably invented by Callimachus, a Greek sculptor and architect who lived in the 5th century BC
    18. 18. Named after Corinth, a city in Greece
    19. 19. Developed in Athens, Greece
    20. 20. Rarely used in Greece
    21. 21. Fluted (grooved) shaft
    22. 22. Capital decorated with scrolls, acanthus leaves, and flowers
    23. 23. Ornaments on the capital flare outwards, suggesting a sense of height</li></li></ul><li>Temple of Olympian Zeus<br />in Athens, Greece.<br />
    24. 24.
    25. 25. Digital image. DeviantART. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://browse.deviantart.com/?q=colesseum>.<br />Greek Columns. Digital image. Google Images. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://images.google.com>.<br />"Temple of Athena Nike - Athens, Greece." Sacred Sites at Sacred Destinations - Explore Sacred Sites, Religious Sites, Sacred Places. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.sacred-destinations.com/greece/athens-temple-of-athena-nike>.<br />"Doric Column - Definition of Doric Column - Architecture Glossary." Architecture and House Styles and Building Design. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://architecture.about.com/od/buildingparts/g/doric-column.htm>.<br />“Ionic Column - Definition of Ionic Column - Architecture Glossary." Architecture and House Styles and Building Design. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://architecture.about.com/od/buildingparts/g/ionic-column.htm>.<br />“Corinthian Column - Definition of Corinthian Column - Architecture Glossary." Architecture and House Styles and Building Design. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://architecture.about.com/od/buildingparts/g/corinthian-column.htm>.<br /><ul><li>Dietsch, Deborah K. "Greek Architecture: Doric, Ionic, or Corinthian? - For Dummies." How-To Help and Videos - For Dummies. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/greek-architecture-doric-ionic-or-corinthian.html>.</li>

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