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Reader's theatre a telephone call by dorothy parker
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Reader's theatre a telephone call by dorothy parker

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Reading aloud - Reader's Theatre

Reading aloud - Reader's Theatre

Published in: Education

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  • 1. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 1 Reader 1 Please God, let him telephone me now. Everybody Dear God, let him call me now. Reader 3 I won’t ask anything else of You, truly I won’t. Reader 4 It isn’t very much to ask. Reader 5 It would be so little to You, God, such a little, little thing. Reader 6 Only let him telephone now. Reader 3 Please, God. Reader 6 Please, please, please. Reader 1 If I didn’t think about it, maybe the telephone might ring. Reader 2 Sometimes it does that. Reader 4 If I could think of something else. Reader 2 If I could think of something else. Reader 4 Maybe if I counted five hundred by fives, it might ring by that time. Reader 1 I’ll count slowly. Reader 3 I won’t cheat. Reader 1 And if it rings when I get to three hundred, I won’t stop; I won’t answer it until I get to five hundred. Reader 4 Five, ten, fifteen, twenty, twenty-five, thirty thirty-five, forty, forty- five, fifty… Reader 1 Oh, please ring. Everybody Please. Reader 3 This is the last time I’ll look at the clock. Reader 2 I will not look at it again. Reader 3 It’s ten minutes past seven.
  • 2. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 2 Reader 6 He said he would telephone at five o’clock. Reader 2 “I’ll call you at five, my dear.” Reader 4 I think that’s where he said, “my dear”. Reader 5 I’m almost sure he said it there. Reader 1 I know he called me “my dear” twice, and the other time was when he said goodbye. Reader 5 “Goodbye, my dear.” Reader 6 He was busy, and he can’t say much in the office, but he called me “my dear” twice. Reader 5 He couldn’t have minded my calling him up. Reader 2 I know you shouldn’t keep telephoning them – I known they don’t like that. Reader 3 When you do that, you know you are thinking about them and wanting them, and that makes them hate you. Reader 5 But I hadn’t talked to him in three days – not in three days. Reader 4 And all I did was ask him how he was; it was just the way anybody might have called him up. Everybody He couldn’t have minded that. Reader 6 He couldn’t have thought I was bothering him. Reader 5 “No, of course you’re not,” he said. Reader 4 And he said he’d telephone me. Reader 3 He didn’t have to say that. Reader 2 I didn’t ask him to, truly I didn’t. Reader 1 I’m sure I didn’t. Reader 2 He doesn’t wish that about me.
  • 3. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 3 Reader 1 I don’t think he even knows how he makes me feel. Reader 3 I wish he could know, without my telling him. Reader 4 They don’t like you to tell them they’ve made you cry. Reader 5 They don’t like you to tell them you’re unhappy because of them. Reader 6 If you do, they think you’re possessive and exacting. Reader 1 And then they hate you. Reader 2 They hate you whenever you say anything you really think. Reader 3 You always have to keep playing little games. Reader 4 Oh, I thought we didn’t have to; I thought this was so big I could say whatever I meant. Reader 5 I guess you can’t, ever. Reader 6 I guess there isn’t ever anything big enough for that. Reader 1 Oh, I thought we didn’t have to: I thought this was so big I could say whatever I meant. Reader 2 I guess you can’t, ever. Reader 3 I guess there isn’t ever anything big enough for that. Reader 4 Oh, if he would just telephone, I wouldn’t tell him I had been sad about him. Reader 5 They hate sad people. Reader 6 I would be so sweet and so happy, he couldn’t help but like me. Reader 3 If he would only telephone. Everybody If he would only telephone. Reader 1 It would be so easy to telephone him. Reader 2 Then I’d know. Reader 4 Maybe it wouldn’t be a foolish thing to do.
  • 4. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 4 Reader 2 Maybe he wouldn’t mind. Reader 4 Maybe he’d like it. Reader 1 Maybe he has been trying to get me. Reader 3 Sometimes people try and try to get you on the telephone, and they say the number doesn’t answer. Reader 1 I’m not just saying that to help myself; that really happens. Reader 4 You know that really happens, God. Reader 1 Oh, God, keep me away from that telephone. Everybody Keep me away. Reader 3 Let me still have just a little bit of pride. Reader 2 I think I’m going to need it, God. Reader 3 I think it will be all I’ll have. Reader 6 Oh, what does pride matter, when I can’t stand it if I don’t talk to him? Reader 2 Pride like that is such a silly, shabby little thing. Reader 4 The real pride, the big pride, is in having no pride. Reader 5 I’m not saying that just because I want to call him. Reader 1 I am not. Reader 5 That’s true, I know that’s true. Reader 6 I will be big. Reader 5 I will be beyond little prides. Everybody Please, God, keep me from telephoning him. Reader 3 Please, God.
  • 5. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 5 Reader 5 I don’t see what pride has to do with it. Reader 4 This is such a little thing, for me to be bringing in pride, for me to be making such a fuss about. Reader 5 I may have misunderstood him. Reader 6 Maybe he said for me to call him up, at five. Reader 5 “Call me at five, my dear.” Reader 4 He could have said that, perfectly well. ‘ Reader 3 It’s so possible that I didn’t hear him right. Reader 2 “Call me at five, my dear.” Reader 1 I’m almost sure that’s what he said. Reader 2 God, don’t let me talk this way to myself. Reader 1 Make me know, please make me know. Reader 3 I’ll think about something else. Reader 4 I’ll just sit quietly. Reader 5 If I could sit still. Reader 6 If I could sit still. Reader 1 Maybe I could read. Reader 2 Oh, all the books are about people who love each other, truly and sweetly. Reader 3 What do they want to write about that for? Everybody Don’t they know it isn’t true? Reader 1 Don’t they know it’s a lie? Reader 2 What do they have to tell about that for, when they know how it hurts?
  • 6. Readers’ Theatre A Telephone Call by Dorothy Parker Rearranged by Yeo Yam Hwee 6 Reader 3 God, aren’t You really going to let him call me? Reader 4 Are You sure, God? Reader 5 Couldn’t you please relent? Reader 6 Couldn’t You? Reader 3 Please, God, please. Reader 6 I’ll do it so slowly and so fairly. Reader 1 If he hasn’t telephoned me then, I’ll call him. Reader 2 I will. Everybody Oh please, dear God, dear kind God. Reader 2 Let him call before then. Reader 4 Five, ten, fifteen, twenty, twenty-five, thirty, thirty-five… THE END

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