Preparatory examinations 1127 english paper 2 - term4 week4.2010 at shss-further worked out solutions v2

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  • 1. St. Hilda’s Secondary School 4E/4NA/5E Preparatory Examinations 1127 Paper 2 Prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee with inputs from the setter of the examination papers and students in 5B.2010 at S.H.S.S. For Use in BTT/NSP.T4W5.2010 NSP Weeks 5 and 6.2010
  • 2. Which are the IYOW questions? 1m Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. 6. 1m Write down the single words which tells us that something is in limited amount? 5. 2m Explain why people consume tiger parts. 4. 2m In your own words, explain why the international trade3 in wildlife products is a lucrative business. 3. 2m Why does the author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts? 2. 1m Which word in the paragraph signals an impending problem? 1.
  • 3. Which are the IYOW questions? 2m Which two words in the paragraph have the same meaning as “disconcerted”? 12. 1m Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on his scalp? 11. 1m Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words. 10. 1m What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? 9. 1m What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over”? 8. 2m What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? 7.
  • 4. Which are the IYOW questions? 5m Vocabulary questions 15. 1m What did the author liken the tiger’s mouth to? 14. 2m Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? 13.
  • 5. Read Passage A and Passage B and then answer the questions which are printed on the Question Paper.
    • Passage A
    • The single greatest cause of extinction that looms over most Asian wildlife especially the endangered tiger, and pushes them to become endangered species, is the massive demand for traditional medicine. The annual consumption of traditional remedies made of tiger bone, bear gall bladder, rhinoceros horn, dried geckoes and a plethora of other animal parts is of phenomenal proportions. It is believed that today at least sixty percent of China’s billion-plus inhabitants use medicines of this type.
  • 6.
    • The single greatest cause of extinction that looms over most Asian wildlife especially the endangered tiger, and pushes them to become endangered species , is the massive demand for traditional medicine . The annual consumption of traditional remedies made of tiger bone, bear gall bladder, rhinoceros horn, dried geckoes and a plethora of other animal parts is of phenomenal proportions . It is believed that today at least sixty percent of China’s billion- plus i nhabitants use medicines of this type .
    only / sole / one state of being completely dying off determinant / agent / reason/ root largest / biggest threatens / negatively affects/ emerges Animals roaming about in forests or jungles particularly being put at risk / threatened variety / class / breed / kind / type very huge / enormous need / want / requirement customary / handed down / habitual yearly usage cures / medicinal formulae / panaceas / treatments a large number Unbelievable / miraculous / Extraordinary / unusual / exceptional / rare / out of this world over People nature / kind IN MY OWN WORDS thought
  • 7.
    • The single greatest cause of extinction that looms over most Asian wildlife especially the endangered tiger, and pushes them to become endangered species, is the massive demand for traditional medicine. The annual consumption of traditional remedies made of tiger bone, bear gall bladder, rhinoceros horn, dried geckoes and a plethora of other animal parts is of phenomenal proportions. It is believed that today at least sixty percent of China’s billion-plus inhabitants use medicines of this type .
    • The greatest reason for extinction that threatens most Asian wild animals, particularly the endangered tiger, and pushes them to become endangered breed, is the very huge demand for traditional cures. The yearly usage of traditional formulae consists of tiger bone, bear gall bladder, rhinoceros horn, dried geckoes and a very impressive range of other animal parts. Today at least sixty percent of China’s over a billion inhabitants use medicines of this type.
    Original Text - Paragraph 1 Reading with Understanding = Comprehension
  • 8. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • Which word in the paragraph signals an impending problem? [1m]
    • Why does the author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
  • 9. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • Which word in the paragraph signals an impending problem? [1m]
    warns / highlights / brings out Approaching, Coming, forthcoming This question requires you to FIND the correct word from Passage A Paragraph 1.
  • 10. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • Which word in the paragraph signals an impending problem? [1m]
    • The word is “looms”.
    • From Paragraph 1
    • The single greatest cause of extinction that looms over most Asian wildlife especially the endangered tiger, and pushes them to become endangered species, is the massive demand for traditional medicine.
    threatens / negatively affects The problem as mentioned here refers to:
  • 11. Selected 4B Students’ Responses to Question 1 The word is “extinction”. Lydia The word is “endangered”. Matthaeus The word is “massive”. Hanis The word is “endangered”. Katrianne The word is “extinction”. Nadiah The word is “extinction”. Erwin Eng The word is “looms”. Cogels Chan The word is “extinction”. Angelina Gerard The word is “looms”. Shafiqah The word is “looms”. Cherlyn Tei The word is “looms”. Kevin Chua The word is “looms”. Clara Ng
  • 12. Selected 4D Students’ Responses to Question 1
  • 13. Selected 5B Students’ Responses to Question 1 The word is “endangered”. Ibrahim The word is “looms”. Dinnie Fahmie The word is “extinction”, Stamford The word is ‘looms’. Ain The word is “extinction”. Macric Koh The word is “looms”. Bryan Loh The word is “extinction”. Say Kiat The word is “extinction”. Jeshere Lim The word is “looms”. Abel Yeo The word is “extinction”. Aldrich Chew It is “looms”. Sze Yan The word is “extinction”. Shi Hui
  • 14. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts ? [2m]
    You are required to know the meaning of “ phenomenal ”. You are also expected to know the meaning of “ proportions ”.
  • 15. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
  • 16. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    Must confer the idea of the large size of the population involved in the consumption of animal parts. Extent/ magnitude / scale / scope / massiveness / large number of Proportions (1m) Must confer the idea of it being beyond predicted and normal Extraordinary/ exceptional / unparalleled / alarmingly/ unbelievably/ extremely Phenomenal (1m)
  • 17. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    The author uses “phenomenal proportions” to tell us of his discovery of the unbelievingly large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 1
  • 18. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    The author uses “phenomenal proportions” to tell us of his discovery of the surprisingly large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 2
  • 19. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    The author uses “phenomenal proportions” to tell us of his discovery of the incredibly large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 3
  • 20. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    The author uses “phenomenal proportions” to tell us of his discovery of the alarmingly large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 4
  • 21. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    “ Phenomenal proportions” tells us he is surprised by the exceptionally large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 5
  • 22. From Passage A Paragraph 1
    • 2. Why does the author use “ phenomenal proportions ” to describe the consumption of animal parts? [2m]
    “ Phenomenal proportions” tells us he is surprised by the unbelievably large amount of animal parts which people consume. Suggested Answer 6
  • 23. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 2 The author uses it to illustrate the massive amounts of animal parts that are being consumed by humans today. Anna Lisa The authour uses the words “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts as a very extraordinary way. Matthaeus Ang People consume animal parts in proportion that are beyond what people think. Nurulhuda The consumption of animal parts which are endangered are astonishing. Hanis The consumption of the animal parts is greatly used and it’s porportions are surprising. Michelle Rajoo The author use ‘phenomenal proportions’ as their are not many animals parts that are used traditional remedies and that the supply of the animals parts are not enough to provided for the so many demands of it. Lydia Kek
  • 24. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 2 The author is trying to tell us that the demand for animal parts are extremely high. Sarah De Souza The consumption of animal parts are in very huge portions. Angelina Gerard It is because the phenomenal proportions is made of tiger bone bear gall bladder, rhinoceros horn, dried geckos and a plethora of other animal parts. Some of which are the endangered animal. Cherlyn Tei This is because it is belived that 60 percent of china’s population use this kind of medicine. Amanda Ng Many animals are becoming endangered due to the widespread hunting for these animals and this demand increases over time. Malcolm Tay It is to say that many people are using the animal parts remarkably, and in china at least 60% of the inhabitants use them to make medicines. Erwin Eng
  • 25. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 2
  • 26. Selected 5B students’ Responses to Question 2 The consumption of animal parts for traditional remedies was in massive demand. Dinie Fahmie Humans consume a lot traditional animals parts. The amount that are being consumed is unbelievable. Terrence Chew Consumption of animal parts are beyond expected, the number of consumption is huge. Macric Koh The author used “phenomenal proportions” to describe the ridiculous rate of consumption of traditional remedies. Sze Yan “ Phenomenal proportions” is an estimation for the annual consumption of animal parts. Cheng Xiang The numbers of consumption of animal parts are very large. Shi Hui The author use “phenomenal proportions” to describe the consumption of animal parts as he is trying to say that many animals are killed because each animal has a limited amount of organs. Joleen It is to probably to say the consumption of animal parts is normally bigger. Mulhaimin
  • 27.
    • Passage A
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
  • 28.
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar , lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets .
    prospering / vastly improving countries Increase steeply/ Increase drastically Increasing World business / global exchange of goods and services educated guess current cures / treatments accessible by logical to suggest / reasonable to claim Prosperous / Rich huge, very big, tremendous, enormous Impact / influence need / requirement goody / treat / gourmet food personal, non-public, own, attendance by invitation only feasts
  • 29.
    • Passage A
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • The prospering countries and growing individual salaries of Southeast Asia have increased the people’s needs which bring about sharp rise in prices, raising the worldwide trading in products deriving from wild animals to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been currently that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these medical products available to most people. It is natural this newly wealthy population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In China, tiger parts are a favourite item in the menu that is served at important feasts.
  • 30. From Passage A Paragraph 2
    • In your own words, explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
  • 31. From Passage A Paragraph 2
    • In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    money-making / profitable
  • 32. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    We cannot run away from Paragraph 2 because we are Informed that the answer we need can be gleaned from this paragraph.
  • 33. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    The subject matter is “the international trade in wildlife products” We must locate the phrase or the expression in the paragraph clearly.
  • 34. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business BECAUSE …
  • 35. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    Some of us may think that we do not understand the meaning of “lucrative business” but clearly this refers to the international trade in wildlife products. What kind of business volume is it supposed to be? An estimated $6 billion-a-year business. Is this a huge business? Does it make money? There you are, “lucrative” means “profitable” or “money making”.
  • 36. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business BECAUSE … We return to the task of finding the correct answer from the relevant area of this paragraph
  • 37. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business BECAUSE the booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar. raising the volume of International trade in wildlife products
  • 38. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business BECAUSE … We return to the task of finding the correct answer from the relevant area of this paragraph
  • 39. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business. The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business BECAUSE the booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar. IRRELEVANT AREA OF TEXT
  • 40. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • The booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar, lifting the international trade in wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion-a-year business.
    RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT When we rephrase the Question 3, to form the Answer Stem, we get: International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar.
  • 41. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m] International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the booming economies and personal incomes of Southeast Asia have caused demand and prices to soar . GET THE CORRECT ANSWER – NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS FIRST prospering countries / thriving countries / fast developing countries / countries which are doing a lot of business / private wages / Individual salaries resulted in wants and needs cost increase drastically
  • 42. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m] International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the prospering Southeast Asian countries and their people’s wages have resulted in the consumer’s wants and needs, and costs of purchase to increase drastically . In your own words does not mean replacing the given words, word for word.
  • 43. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m] International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the fast developing Southeast Asian countries and their people’s salaries have resulted in the consumer’s expectations and wants, and costs of purchase to go up steeply . In your own words does not mean replacing the given words, word for word.
  • 44. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m] International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the fast developing Southeast Asian countries and their people’s salaries have resulted in the consumer’s expectations and wants, and costs of purchase to skyrocket . In your own words does not mean replacing the given words, word for word.
  • 45. 3. In your own words , explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m] International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business because the rapidly growing Southeast Asian countries and their people’s salaries have generated a steep increase in the consumer’s expectations and wants, and costs of purchase . In your own words does not mean replacing the given words, word for word.
  • 46. From Passage A Paragraph 2
    • In your own words, explain why the international trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business. [2m]
    • Resulted
    • Rise / skyrocket ( X = prices to rocket)
    • (2/2 for 1 mark)
    (1) Caused by demand and prices to (2) soar
    • Thriving / successful / flourishing / prospering / blossoming / fast developing / rapidly growing ( Cannot be accepted – developing / growing / rising / increase / improving)
    • Individual
    • Salaries / earnings ( X = wealth)
    • (2/3 for 1 mark)
    (1) Booming economies (2) personal (3) Incomes
  • 47. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 3 It is because of the increasing economies and the salaries of Southeast Asia. Shakinah The trade of wildlife products is profitatable due to expanding economies and increasing salaries. Esther Soh As there are more people, more people wil buy the products causing the business to prosper. Matthaeus Ang It is because of the economies is getting better, personal salary are well paid, therefore, the need of wildlife product and the price rise up, lifting 6 billion per annual business. Aaron The growing economy and salary of southeast asians have caused demand and the amount they pay to soar. Angelina It is a lucrative business as there are high demands for animal parts, this causes the cost of animal parts to rise. However, people can afford them as they are increasing in wealth. Sarah
  • 48. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 3
  • 49. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 3 International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative buiness as the Asian market accelerates, Asians become richer thus able to afford more expensive medicine, contributing to a boost in the business. Sze Yan The wildlife animal parts are selling at a very good price and the price is still increasing greatly. Kai JIe Obtaining wildlife products is a difficult task, thus the parts obtained from animals are sold at a very high price and the profits earned outweigh its original cost to abstract the parts, making it a lucrative business. Abel Yeo It is a lucrative business because it is an expensive trade and using animal parts. Ibrahim International trade in wildlife products is a lucrative business due to the rapid economic growth of Southeast Asia that have caused demand and prices to ascalate, lifting the wildlife products to an estimated $6 billion a year business. Dinnie Fahmie The demand for animals parts are gradually increasing. Therefore people who owned some animals parts, can sell it at a high price to those wanted the animal parts. Terrence Chew
  • 50. From Passage A Paragraph 2
    • 4. Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
  • 51. To answer Question 4, we have to look further into the other part of Paragraph 2.
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    • What is the meaning of “consume”?
    • to consume = to use
    • a consumer = a user
    • consumption = usage
  • 52. Once we know that “to consume” means “to use”, we should know the relevant areas of the text (paragraph 2) to look out for.
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new , but it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people. It is no wonder then that this newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets .
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    • What is the meaning of “consume”?
    • to consume = to use
    • a consumer = a user
    • consumption = usage
  • 53. Once we know that “to consume” means “to use”, we should know the relevant areas of the text (paragraph 2) to look out for.
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new…
    • In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    • What is the meaning of “consume”?
    • to consume = to use
    • a consumer = a user
    • consumption = usage
  • 54. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new…
    • In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    If you lifted, your answer will look something like this: The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new and in many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
  • 55. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new…
    • In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    If you lifted, your answer will look something like this: The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new and in many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
  • 56. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • The use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is nothing new…
    • In many places in China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    Tiger parts are used in Chinese medicine. In China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets. You must restructure the sentence to read:
  • 57. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    Tiger parts are used in Chinese medicine. In China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets. You must restructure the sentence to read: People consume tiger parts because they are used in Chinese medicine. In China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets.
  • 58. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    This answer can be further improved as follows: People consume tiger parts because they are used in Chinese medicine. In China, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets. People consume tiger parts because they are used as ingredients in Chinese medicine and served as a delicacy at special private banquets in China.
  • 59. WHY LIFTING IS NOT READING COMPREHENSION
    • Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    This answer can be further improved as follows: People consume tiger parts because they are used as ingredients in Chinese medicine and served as a delicacy at special private banquets in China. SINCE YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO USE YOUR OWN WORDS, THIS ANSWER WILL AWARD YOU WITH TWO MARKS. 1m 1m
  • 60. From Passage A Paragraph 2
    • 4. Explain why people consume tiger parts. [2m]
    Excess Denies Newly affluent population has had a great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts Excess Denies Increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made these remedies available to most people (X = tiger parts have medicinal value) 1m Tiger parts are a delicacy 1m Use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine
  • 61. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 4 Tiger parts are consumed to cure illnesses and served as a delicacy during special private banquets. Nurulhuda It is due to an increase in the standard of living that causes all these remedies to become available and at the same time, people are easily influenced by the great effect on wildlife numbers and the demand for tiger parts. Doreen Swee The medicine contain tiger parts are cureable to most of the diseases and ti is symbol of high status in resturant. Cogels Chan People consume tiger parts because it has only been in recent years that the increase in the standard of living in Southeast Asia has made the use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine available to most people. Shakinah Tiger parts are consumed as they are chinese medicine and remedies. Shawn Ng The use of tiger parts in chinese medicine is nothing new, but it has only been in recent years that the increase Michelle Chan
  • 62. Selected 4D student’s responses to Question 4
  • 63. Selected 5B student’s responses to Question 4 People who consume tiger parts are being seen as people with high status and wealth. Furthermore, medicine made from tiger parts can also cure illness that western medicine cannot. Kenny Tan Consuming tiger parts shows the status of a person, as one of power and riches, therefore it is regularly consumed by wealthy people during private banquets. Abel Yeo People consume tiger parts fro Chinese medicine and it is also a delicacy. Ibrahim They consume tiger parts as medicines to make them healtier. Stamford Tiger parts is use primarily in Chinese medicine and a delicacy as a symbol of high status and wealth. Dinie Fahmie It is because to people, tiger parts are a delicacy that is served at special private banquets and also the use of tiger parts in Chinese medicine is now made available to almost everyone in the world. Siew Hui
  • 64.
    • Passage A
    3. The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a symbol of high status and wealth. Some remedies list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only trace elements; but even these are enough to promote the continued slaughter of the tiger. In addition, in recent years there has been resurgence in traditional practices fundamental to the history of Chinese society. This has been fuelled by cultural pride. There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness. Furthermore, new communities around the globe including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, igniting the demand for tiger parts beyond what can be supplied.
  • 65. 3. The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a symbol of high status and wealth. Some remedies list tiger parts as an ingredient , but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only trace elements; but even these are enough to promote the continued slaughter of the tiger. In addition , in recent years there has been resurgence in traditional practices f undamental to the history of Chinese society. This has been fuelled by cultural pride . There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness . Furthermore , new communities around the globe including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, igniting the demand for tiger parts beyond what can be supplied. threatened to die off completely sign / mark / indication prestige / position / class / standing component, element, part, item pinch / speck / a tiny bit encourage / motivate killing besides / moreover / furthermore recently, nowadays conventional, customary renewal of interest, reemergence foundational, underlying, Integral, basic, essential driven, motivated dignity, ego, arrogance feelings flaws, weaknesses, drawbacks worldwide / internationally moreover, besides adding to, complementing, augmenting, reinforcing technique, way of administering arousing, sparking need, requirement
  • 66.
    • Passage A
    3. The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a symbol of high status and wealth. Some remedies list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only trace elements; but even these are enough to promote the continued slaughter of the tiger. In addition, in recent years there has been resurgence in traditional practices fundamental to the history of Chinese society. This has been fuelled by cultural pride. There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness. Furthermore, new communities around the globe including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, igniting the demand for tiger parts beyond what can be supplied. 3. The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a sign of high social position and wealth. Some medicinal cures list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only very little bit of tiger-related ingredients in them; but even these are enough to promote the continued killing of the tiger. Recently there has also been re-emergence in basic customary practices which defines the history of Chinese society. This has been driven by cultural pride. There is also a growing feeling that western medicine contains some weaknesses in treating illness. Furthermore, new global communities including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, causing the demand for tiger parts to become bigger than what the sellers can supply to the customers.
  • 67. From Passage A Paragraph 3
    • 5. Write down the single word which tells us that something is in limited amount? [1m]
  • 68. PARAGRAPH 3
    • The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a symbol of high status and wealth. Some remedies list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only trace elements; but even these are enough to promote the continued slaughter of the tiger. In addition, in recent years there has been resurgence in traditional practices fundamental to the history of Chinese society. This has been fuelled by cultural pride. There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness. Furthermore, new communities around the globe including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, igniting the demand for tiger parts beyond what can be supplied.
    5. Write down the single word which tells us that something is in limited amount ? [1m] There is only …. Something has only …
  • 69. PARAGRAPH 3
    • The medicines may have only trace elements.
    • There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness.
    5. Write down the single word which tells us that something is in limited amount ? [1m] There is only …. Something has only …
  • 70. From Passage A Paragraph 3
    • Write down the single word which tells us that something is in limited amount? [1m]
    • The word is “trace”.
    • X = endangered, shortcomings
  • 71. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 5 The word is “supplementing”. Melvin Chan The word is “endangered”. Shafiqah The word is “shortcomings”. Jie Hui The word is “endangered”. Shawn Yeung The word is “trace”. Hanis The word is “trace”. Nurulhuda
  • 72. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 5
  • 73. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 5 The word is “trace”. Siew Hui The word is “igniting”. Stamford The word is “trace”. Ibrahim The word is “beyond”. Abel Yeo The word is “shortcomings”. Say Kiat The word is “endangered”. Kenny Tan
  • 74.
    • Passage A
    4. The popularity of tiger bones as a remedy for a multitude of ailments has produced a thriving black market, which is very difficult to monitor. Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be crushed and made odourless and can be disguised as other types of bones. Tiger derivatives that are confiscated in raids by government officials are therefore believed to be just the tip of the iceberg.
  • 75. 4. The popularity of tiger bones as a remedy for a multitude of ailments has produced a thriving black market , which is very difficult to monitor . Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be crushed and made odourless and can be disguised as other types of bones. Tiger derivatives that are confiscated in raids by government officials are therefore believed to be just the tip of the iceberg . Wide acceptance, appeal treatment, cure many kinds sicknesses, illnesses, medical problems generated, spun off, growing, flourishing, prospering, booming illegal buying and selling of goods and services hard oversea, watch over, observe, police, check, keep an eye on mashed, squashed, crunched without any smell covered up, masked, veiled, passed off products springing from the original material seized, appropriated, taken away sweeps thus thought a small sign of a problem which is much larger
  • 76.
    • Passage A
    4. The popularity of tiger bones as a remedy for a multitude of ailments has produced a thriving black market, which is very difficult to monitor. Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be crushed and made odourless and can be disguised as other types of bones. Tiger derivatives that are confiscated in raids by government officials are therefore believed to be just the tip of the iceberg. 4. The popularity of tiger bones as a medical cure for many illnesses has created a busy and profitable illegal market, which is very difficult for the government to keep a lookout for. Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be crushed and made to produce no giveaway smell and can be disguised as other types of bones. These products made from tiger parts which are taken away forcefully from the illegal sellers in police sweeps are thus thought to have revealed only a tiny part of an illegal business activity which has a much bigger scale.
  • 77.
    • Passage A
    5. The trade in tiger parts is thought to have intensified as a result of a rapid increase in the demand for traditional Chinese medicine in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea. Despite the acceptance of new trade policies in China, it still remains a principle player in the demise of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up enforcement efforts since coming under pressure from the United States in 1993-1994.
  • 78.
    • Passage A
    5. The trade in tiger parts is thought to have intensified as a result of a rapid increase in the demand for traditional Chinese medicine in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea. Despite the acceptance of new trade policies in China, it still remains a principal player in the demise of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up enforcement efforts since coming under pressure from the United States in 1993-1994. 5. The business in tiger parts has become stronger because of a fast rise in people’s needs for customary Chinese medicine in East Asian countries. Despite the introduction of new trade policies in the country, China is still a key player in causing the death of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up policing efforts since coming under criticism from the United States in 1993-1994.
  • 79. 5. The trade in tiger parts is thought to have intensified as a result of a rapid increase in the demand for traditional Chinese medicine in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea . Despite the acceptance of new trade policies in China, it still remains a principal player in the demise of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up enforcement efforts since coming under pressure from the United States in 1993-1994. believed heightened / magnified / amplified East Asian countries outcome, consequence quick / fast rise customary In spite of adoption, recognition rules and regulations main, key termination, death, end increased execution / implementation / policing work criticism, warning, persuasion
  • 80.
    • Passage A
    6. However, such policing efforts in Asian countries touch only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As the demand for tiger products continues to grow, and poaching is still prominent in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be implemented to curb both the supply and the demand for endangered tiger parts.
  • 81.
    • Passage A
    6. However, such policing efforts in Asian countries touch only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As the demand for tiger products continues to grow, and poaching is still prominent in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be implemented to curb both the supply and the demand for endangered tiger parts. 6. But such policing efforts in Asian countries affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As people’s need for tiger products continues to grow, and illegal hunting and killing is still very common in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be taken up to control the trading of endangered tiger parts.
  • 82. 6. However, such policing efforts in Asian countries touch only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As the demand for tiger products continues to grow, and poaching is still prominent in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be implemented to curb both the supply and the demand for endangered tiger parts. enforcement, implementation, monitoring learn about, receive information supplementary, further, extra threatened, imperiled, put at risk striking, problematic, blatant, rampant affect, involve, concern, has to do with distribute away, scatter, disseminate Illegal hunting actions, procedures, policies, steps put in place, carried out, executed, enforced control, limit, manage, slow down
  • 83.
    • Passage A
    7. Many of the tiger-range countries’ governments have established legal provisions to protect the endangered tiger. In addition, most tiger countries are members of CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which bans the trade of tiger parts (the exceptions are Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal structures, political commitment, and financial resources severely limit domestic enforcement efforts.
  • 84.
    • Passage A
    7. Many of the tiger-range countries’ governments have established legal provisions to protect the endangered tiger. In addition, most tiger countries are members of CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which bans the trade of tiger parts (the exceptions are Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal structures, political commitment, and financial resources severely limit domestic enforcement efforts. 7. Many governments who run countires with sizeable tiger populations have set up laws to protect the endangered tiger. Many tiger countries are also members of CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which forbids the buying and selling of tiger parts (the exceptions are Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal coverage, government involvement, and funds seriously limit domestic policing efforts.
  • 85. 7. Many of the tiger-range countries’ governments have established legal provisions to protect the endangered tiger. In addition , most tiger countries are members of CITES ( Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which bans the trade of tiger parts (the exceptions are Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal structures , political commitment , and financial resources severely limit domestic enforcement efforts. set up, put together lawful measures, Policies, rules and regulations besides, moreover, furthermore meeting, assembly, Conference, caucus insufficient framework, system governmental monetary support support, promise, pledge, responsibility, obligation greatly, seriously restrict, hold back, curb Internal, local implementation policing, monitoring
  • 86.
    • Passage A
    8. Despite legislation banning hunting, the staff employed to protect tigers in “protected areas” often are not legally empowered to enforce anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or confiscating hunting weapons, arresting or prosecuting poachers, or even carrying guns to protect the tigers, as well as themselves, from poachers.
  • 87.
    • Passage A
    8 . Despite legislation banning hunting, the staff employed to protect tigers in “protected areas” often are not legally empowered to enforce anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or confiscating hunting weapons, arresting or prosecuting poachers, or even carrying guns to protect the tigers, as well as themselves, from poachers. 8 . Although there are laws which stops people from hunting, the staff employed to protect tigers in “protected areas” often are not given any power to see that people actually obey anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or confiscating hunting weapons, arresting or throwing illegal hunters into the courts , or even carrying guns to protect the tigers and themselves.
  • 88. 8. Despite legislation banning hunting, the staff employed to protect tigers in “protected areas” often are not legally empowered to enforce anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or confiscating hunting weapons, arresting or prosecuting poachers , or even carrying guns to protect the tigers, as well as themselves, from poachers. In spite of rules and regulations, laws, policies putting an end to, outlawing, forbidding, Stopping, prohibiting, disallowing, barring authorised impose, implement curbed, limited Removing from one’s possession charging someone in a court of law People who hunt animals illegally
  • 89.
    • Passage A
    9. Furthermore, anti-hunting laws that protect tigers do not protect tiger prey, leaving tigers in vital tiger habitat wtihout food nor do they protect endangered tiger populations that exist or stray outside protected areas, or roam across country borders.
  • 90. 9. Furthermore , anti-hunting laws that protect tigers do not protect tiger prey , leaving tigers in vital tiger habitat wtihout food nor do they protect endangered tiger populations that exist or stray outside protected areas, or roam across country borders. Besides, moreover the hunted, quarry important, crucial, essential home, living area look after, Take care of wander away, rove, straggle move about aimlessly
  • 91.
    • Passage A
    9. Furthermore, anti-hunting laws that protect tigers do not protect tiger prey, leaving tigers in vital tiger habitat wtihout food nor do they protect endangered tiger populations that exist or stray outside protected areas, or roam across country borders. 9. Anti-hunting laws that protect tigers also do not protect the animals which the tigers feed on, leaving tigers in important tiger living areas wtihout food nor do they protect endangered tiger populations that exist or move about outside protected areas, or roam across country borders.
  • 92.
    • Passage A
    10. Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce of anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek.
  • 93. 10. Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce of anti-hunting laws are ineffective . Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek . insufficient manpower employed for a particular purpose Insufficient money or funds allocated to do something impotent, futile, Inadequate, not working to its full extent bribery exposed, susceptible, unprotected against thriving, prospering, flourishing countries shortage force generous, huge, big, handsome reward bureaucrats, people who work for the government / people who work in the public sector using money to entice, buy off To feign ignorance, to pretend not to know or notice
  • 94.
    • Passage A
    10. Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. 10. Forestry and wildlife departments do not have enough manpower or money to save the endangered tiger from illegal hunters. Having not enough funds, organisation, good enough pay for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also tempt some officials to accept money from illegal hunters . The decreasing tiger population and Asia’s prosperous countries push up the price of tiger parts, encouraging illegal hunters to bribe some governmental officials to pretend not to know that illegal hunting is taking place.
  • 95. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
  • 96. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. Some officials accept bribes.
  • 97. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers . [1m]
    Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. POACHERS GIVE BRIBES.
  • 98. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. POACHERS GIVE BRIBES.
  • 99. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. OFFICIALS ACCEPT BRIBES.
  • 100. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under-budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Lacking funds, organisation, compensation for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols, and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective. Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. There is nothing to do with so-and-so accepting bribes from so-and-so. SO THIS PART HERE IS IRRELEVANT SOME OFFICIALS accepting bribes from POACHERS. SO THIS PART HERE IS RELEVANT
  • 101. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. SOME OFFICIALS accepting bribes from POACHERS. SO THIS PART HERE IS RELEVANT Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. RELEVANT TO OFFICIALS RELEVANT TO POACHERS
  • 102. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption . The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. SOME OFFICIALS accepting bribes from POACHERS. SO THIS PART HERE IS RELEVANT Poor quality of life exposes some officials to the temptation of receiving illegal money from poachers. The poachers make a lot of money when the price of tiger parts goes up because of the decrease in the population of tigers and the increase in demand for Tiger parts in the successful and fast developing countries. Their business success motivates poachers to bribe officials to make sure they pretend not to know about the illegal tiger parts business.
  • 103. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. RELEVANT TO OFFICIALS RELEVANT TO POACHERS
  • 104. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. The tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up, offering great incentive to poachers who bribe some governmental officials to turn the other cheek. RELEVANT TO OFFICIALS RELEVANT TO POACHERS
  • 105. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. RELEVANT TO OFFICIALS IF YOU LEAVE THE ANSWER LIKE THIS – YOU ARE LIFTING. YOU DID NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION AT ALL.
  • 106. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Poor standards of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. RELEVANT TO OFFICIALS Some officials accept bribes from the poachers because of their poor standards of living.
  • 107. From Passage A Paragraph 10
    • 6. Explain why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. [1m]
    Excess Denies Lacking funds, organisation, competition for high-risk work, recognition, training, motivation, camps inside the protected areas, night patrols and resources such as firearms, vehicles and communication equipment, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting laws are ineffective Excess Denies Forestry and wildlife departments are too understaffed and under budgeted to save the endangered tiger from poachers. Excess Denies Tigers increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up. (1m) The standard of living is low.
  • 108. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 6 Forestry and wildlife departments are understaffed and underbudgeted and the poor standards of living are why some officials accept bribes from the poachers. Angelina Some officials will accept the bribes from the poachers because they are under-paid for a job that is risky. Shafiqah Officials accept bribes from the proachers because Asia’s economies drive up the price of tiger parts, thus increasing the tiger’s scarcity. Melvin Chan They are having poor standards of living and also with the expensive tiger parts can make them earn more money thus causing the officials to be corrupted. Li Hui Some officials accept bribe from the poachers due to the poor standards of living and the increase in price of tiger parts. Vinitha It is due to the low standards of living that make so officials corrupt, thus allowing bribes from poachers to earn better more income. Shawn Ng Some officials accept bribes from the poachers since the scarcity of the tigers increases and with the booming economies of Asia which increases the price of tiger parts. Shahlehin Some officials accept bribes from the poachers because of the tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies frive the price of tiger parts up. Shakinah
  • 109. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 6 The officials are corrupted because they are not well paid. So when the poachers offer bribes, the officials just take it. Esther Soh The officials live in the place where standard of living is poor, leaving them some of them into corruption. Cogels Chan There were insufficient compensation for high risk work, funds, organisation, recognition, training, motivation, camps, night patrols and resources. Moreover, the guards’ efforts to enforce anti-hunting law are ineffective and poor standards of living also lead to some officials being corrupt. Doreen Swee Some officials accepted bribes from poachers due to the poor standards of living. Nurulhuda It is because of the poor standards of living. Jie Hui The officials are not paid adequately for their job scope. Victoria They are too poor, in order to have more income the officials have to close one eye to let the poachers hunt the tiger. In return, the officials would received bribe by them. Charis Soh Their poor standards of living create a loophole for bribery to take place. Anna Lisa
  • 110. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 6 Some officials accept bribes from the poachers because they have poor standards of living and needed money. Rudy Tay Officials acept bribes from poachers because of their poor standards of living. Sarah In the wildlife department or organisations, they do not earn much. Therefore, to make a living, some officials accept bribes from the poachers. Cynthia Song Due to poor standards of living, leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. Aaron Due to the poor standards of living as well as the ineffective anti-hunting laws, officials often accept bribes from poachers. Clara Ng These officials are living in poor standards of living so when the poaches offer them money to turn a blind eye of their actions, they would be tempted to accept bribes and corruption for more money to improve their standard of living. Benjamin Yam It is because poor standard of living leave some officials vulnerable to corruption which the tigers’ increasing scarcity and Asia’s booming economies drive the price of tiger parts up. Khairiani Officials are subjected to poor working conditions and bad pays, they might just want to make quick and easy money. Kevin Chua
  • 111. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 6
  • 112. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 6 Some governmental officials accept bribes to have a better standard of living. Shi Hui The poor standards of living explains why the officials accepts bribes from the poachers rather than protecting tigers as their job, they feel that accepting the bribe is a much easier way to earn money . Cheng Xiang The officials that accept the bribes from the poachers are nearing to corruption. Daniel Tan Poor standards at living leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. Terrence Chew Some officials accept bribes from poachers because of the poor standard of living also leave some officials vulnerable to corruption. Ain Some officials accept bribes from the poachers because they started the extra income so that they are able to live a better life with more money. Joleen Tan Some officials accept bribes from poachers because of the poor standards of living that will lead to corruption. Muhaimin These bribers gives a much more higher payout than what the government gives them. Jia Jun
  • 113.
    • Passage A
    11. Improved national legislation and international support, when combined with the promotion of alternatives to traditional Chinese remedies and habitat protection, are vital to save the tiger from being an endangered species, or from becoming extinct.
  • 114. 11. Improved national legislation and international support, when combined with the promotion of alternatives to traditional Chinese remedies and habitat protection, are vital to save the tiger from being an endangered species , or from becoming extinct . reinforced, strengthened, revised laws, rules and regulations, policies global, worldwide Other ways / Other means cures, treatments customary, conventional natural living environment essential, key, crucial threatened dying off completely breed
  • 115.
    • Passage A
    11. Improved national legislation and international support, when combined with the promotion of alternatives to traditional Chinese remedies and habitat protection, are vital to save the tiger from being an endangered species, or from becoming extinct. 11. Improved national laws and international support, when combined with the promotion of other methods of traditional Chinese remedies and natural living environmental protection, are important to save the tiger from being an endangered species, or from dying out all together.
  • 116. Passage B
    • 1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over.
  • 117.
    • 1.1 The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes.
    • 1.2 Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence.
    • 1.3 The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound.
    • 1.4 The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena.
    • 1.5 The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed.
    • 1.6 It did not put up a fight.
    • 1.7 Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile
    • gesture of defence.
    • 1.8 The look on its face was of wild terror.
    • 1.9 The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck.
    • 1.10 Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic
    • crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed.
    • 1.11 The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over.
    THE FLASHBACK METHOD IS BEING USED BY THE WRITER OF THIS NARRATION TO INFORM HIS READERS HOW THE HYENA WAS KILLED BY THE TIGER. IN A FLASHBACK, USUALLY THE FINAL OUTCOME IS BEING MADE KNOWN TO THE READERS FIRST, FOLLOWED BY THE PROCESS LEADING TO IT. TO ACHIEVE UNDERSTANDING, CAREFULLY READ and FIND OUT WHO IS THE ONE TELLING YOU THE STORY. IS THIS NARRATOR IN THE PASSAGE OR NOT? IF HE OR SHE IS IN THE PASSAGE, WHAT IS THE ROLE HE OR SHE IS PLAYING?
  • 118.
    • 1.1 The hyena’s end had come , and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes.
    • 1.2 Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence .
    • 1.3 The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound.
    • 1.4 The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena.
    • 1.5 The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed.
    • 1.6 It did not put up a fight .
    • 1.7 Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile
    • gesture of defence .
    • 1.8 The look on its face was of wild terror .
    • 1.9 The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck.
    • 1.10 Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic
    • crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed .
    • 1.11 The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over .
    THE FLASHBACK METHOD IS BEING USED BY THE WRITER OF THIS NARRATION TO INFORM HIS READERS HOW THE HYENA WAS KILLED BY THE TIGER. IN A FLASHBACK, USUALLY THE FINAL OUTCOME IS BEING MADE KNOWN TO THE READERS FIRST, FOLLOWED BY THE PROCESS LEADING TO IT. TO ACHIEVE UNDERSTANDING, CAREFULLY READ WHAT HAD HAPPENED TO THE HYENA NEXT.
  • 119.
    • 1.1 The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes.
    • 1.2 Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence.
    • 1.3 The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound .
    • 1.4 The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena .
    • 1.5 The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed.
    • 1.6 It did not put up a fight.
    • 1.7 Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile
    • gesture of defence.
    • 1.8 The look on its face was of wild terror.
    • 1.9 The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck .
    • 1.10 Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic
    • crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed.
    • 1.11 The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over.
    THE FLASHBACK METHOD IS BEING USED BY THE WRITER OF THIS NARRATION TO INFORM HIS READERS HOW THE HYENA WAS KILLED BY THE TIGER. IN A FLASHBACK, USUALLY THE FINAL OUTCOME IS BEING MADE KNOWN TO THE READERS FIRST, FOLLOWED BY THE PROCESS LEADING TO IT. TO ACHIEVE UNDERSTANDING, CAREFULLY READ WHAT HAD TIGER DONE NEXT.
  • 120. USING THE S.T.A.R. GRID TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND A NARRATIVE TEXT (PASSAGE) RESOLUTION TROUBLE ACTION SETTING
  • 121. USING THE S.T.A.R. GRID TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND A NARRATIVE TEXT (PASSAGE) PREY PREDATOR NARRATOR AS EYEWITNESS NARRATOR witnessed how a hyena was attacked and killed by a tiger and was surprised by the whole experience. How the tiger had attacked the hyena. RESOLUTION TROUBLE: What is the issue? ACTION: SETTING
  • 122. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    • What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over”? [1m]
  • 123. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    What did the author expect to see when he happened to witness a hyena’s encounter with a tiger? What did the author expect to see when he saw a hyena being attacked by a tiger? What did the author expect to see when he saw a tiger attacking a hyena?
  • 124. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations , it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT
  • 125. Difference between WHINING - making a long high unpleasant sound because the animal is in pain or agony. WHIMPERING – making low, weak crying noises because the animal is frightened or hurt.
  • 126. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations , it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT He had expected the killing of the hyena would involved noises coming from both the tiger and the hyena. He had expected the hyena to whine or to whimper and the tiger to kill noisily. He had expected a fight to break out. He had thought that the hyena might put up a good fight for self-defence.
  • 127. 1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations , it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREAs OF THE TEXT He had expected the killing of the hyena would involved noises coming from both the tiger and the hyena. He had expected the hyena to whine or to whimper and the tiger to kill noisily. He had expected a fight to break out. He had thought that the hyena might put up a good fight for self-defence. The tiger’s action and the hyena’s action The tiger’s action and the the hyena’s reaction IRRELEVANT AREAs of THE TEXT The author’s report of the hyena’s death and introduction of the setting
  • 128.
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    Against my expectations , it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The hyena did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence . RELEVANT SECTIONS OF THE RELEVANT TEXT He had expected the killing of the hyena would involved noises coming from both the tiger and the hyena. He had expected the hyena to whine or to whimper and the tiger to kill noisily. He had expected a fight to break out. He had thought that the hyena might put up a good fight for self-defence.
  • 129. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    He had expected the killing of the hyena would involved noises coming from both the tiger and the hyena. He had expected the hyena to whine or to whimper and the tiger to kill noisily. He had expected a fight to break out. He had thought that the hyena might put up a good fight for self-defence. He had expected the hyena to make noise by whining and whimpering and the tiger to kill noisily. He had also expected the hyena to put up a good fight for self-defence against the tiger. 1m 1m
  • 130. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What were the expectations of the author regarding the death of the hyena? [2m]
    • The hyena would make a lot of noise / whine / whimper (idea of sound made) [1m] and put up a fight (idea of struggle). [1m]
    • It was normal for the author to have expected the hyena, being the prey, to put up a good struggle against the predator, the tiger and in so doing, he would also have expected to hear a lot of noises arising from this fight for survival. [2m]
  • 131. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 7 The author expected the hyena to whin or whimpered. Aaron The author expected that the hyena would fight back against the tiger or at least struggle and roar when the tiger attacked it. Cynthia Song The author expected to hear whining and whimpering during the death of the hyena. Sarah As the author would have thought that the hyena would whine or whimper when it died, however it happened practically in silence. Michelle Chan The author expected the death of the hyena to be loud and whining. Rudy Tay
  • 132. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 7 The author had expected the hyena to put up a struggle, whining or whimpering before it died. Esther Soh The author properbly expected the hyena to put up a fight against the tiger or make up a big fuss about it. Kevin Chua The expectation of the author is to hear the sound of killing the hyena. Khairiani The author was expecting his own death to be coming next, following the death of the hyena which happened right before his eyes. Benjamin Yam The author was expecting the hyena to scream or make a lot of noise as it was about to die. Clara Ng
  • 133. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 7 The author had expected it to scream in fear or pain before dying. Even maybe trying to defend tis own life. Victoria The author’s expectations was the hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood roosted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before the author’s eyes. Jie Hui The author expected the death of the hyena to be a little noisy but it was silent. Nurulhuda The author expected the hyena to produce some noise before its death such as whining nor whimpering and being killed with sound. Doreen Swee The auhtor expose the hyena died with lots of sound produced and tiger kill the hyena cold bloodedly. Cogels Chan
  • 134. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 7
  • 135. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 7 The author was shock. He was caught off-guard when the incident happen, leaving author a surprise and stunning feeling. Aldrich Chew The expectations regarding the death of the hyena were suppose to whine or whimper when it died and the hyena was suppose to put up a fight. Jeshere Lim The author expected a struggle and a noise from the hyena. Macric Koh The author expected the hyena to put up a fight or struggle, if not at least run away from the tiger instead of being rooted to the spot. Sze Yan The author expected noises when the tiger killed the hyena. Shi Hui
  • 136. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • 8. What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over”? [1m]
  • 137. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT
  • 138. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The hyena’s end had come, and mine as I stood rooted to the spot, paralysed, in thrall to the action before my eyes. Against my expectations, it happened practically in silence. The hyena died neither whining nor whimpering, and the tiger killed without a sound. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT
  • 139. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT What was happening to the hyena here? What was the tiger doing here?
  • 140. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT What was happening to the hyena here? What was the tiger doing here?
  • 141.
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The flame-coloured carnivore emerged from beneath the tarpaulin and made for the hyena. The hyena was leaning against the stern bench, transfixed. It did not put up a fight. Instead it shrank to the floor, lifting a forepaw in a futile gesture of defence. The look on its face was of wild terror. The tiger’s jaws closed on the side of the hyena’s neck. Its glazed eyes widened and there was a noise of organic crunching as windpipe and spinal cord were crushed. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. What was happening to the hyena here? What was the tiger doing here? The tiger’s deadly attack on the hyena. The killing of the hyena by the tiger.
  • 142.
    • 8 . What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “ The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over ”? [1m]
    1. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over. CHECK BY SUBSTITUTION ALWAYS: 1. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and the tiger’s deadly attack on the hyena was over. 1. The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and the killing of the hyena by the tiger was over.
  • 143. From Passage B Paragraph 1
    • What does “it” refer to in the sentence, “The hyena shook, its eyes went dull and it was over”? [1m]
    • “ It” refers to “the killing of the hyena”.
    • “ It” refers to “the tiger’s deadly attack on the hyena”.
    • “ It’ refers to “the tiger’s killing of the hyena”.
    • “ It” refers to “the process of killing the hyena”.
  • 144. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 8 It refers to the action that was going on when the hyena was being attacked. Shafiqah ‘ It’ refers to the certainty of death of the hyena. Melvin Chan ‘ It’ refers to hyena’s eye. Li Hui ‘ It’ refers to the life of the hyena which was over when the tiger killed it. Vinitha The “it” reffered to the the killing of the hyena. Shawn Ng
  • 145. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 8 It refers to the hyena who died after being killed by a tiger. Shahlehin ‘ It’ refers to the killing process. Shakinah The word “it” refers to the “hyena”. Charis Soh ‘ It’ refers to the hyena’s life. Anna Lisa It refers to the life of the hyena. Angelina
  • 146. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 8
  • 147. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 8 It referes to the hyena’s eyes. Ibrahim “ It” refer to the life of the hyena. Stamford It refers to the hyena’s life. Dinie Fahmie It refers to the death of the hyena. Shehan “ It” refers to the hyena. Siew Hui
  • 148. Passage B
    • 2. The tiger let go and growled but it seemed like a quiet growl, private and half-hearted. He was panting, his tongue hanging from his mouth. He licked his chops, shook his head and sniffed the dead hyena. He raised his head high and smelled the air. He placed his forepaws on the stern bench and lifted himself. The rolling of the boat, though gentle, was visibly not to his liking. He put out a low, mean snarl. He smelled the air again before slowly turning his head till he was looking straight at me.
  • 149.
    • 2.1 The tiger let go and growled but it seemed like a quiet growl, private and half-hearted.
    • 2.2 He was panting, his tongue hanging from his mouth.
    • 2.3 He licked his chops, shook his head and sniffed the dead hyena.
    • 2.4 He raised his head high and smelled the air.
    • 2.5 He placed his forepaws on the stern bench and lifted himself.
    • 2.6 The rolling of the boat , though gentle, was visibly not to his liking.
    • 2.7 He put out a low, mean snarl.
    • 2.8 He smelled the air again before slowly turning his head till he was looking straight at me.
    You should be able to see that the tiger – which was the predator – takes up the whole of Paragraph 2 because he was the “ACTOR” who had generated a lot of “ACTION”. BE SENSITIVE TO ADDITIONAL TEXTUAL CLUE HERE.
  • 150. USING THE S.T.A.R. GRID TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND A NARRATIVE TEXT (PASSAGE) NARRATOR witnessed how a hyena was attacked and killed by a tiger and was surprised by the whole experience. How the tiger had attacked the hyena on a boat which was rolling gently. RESOLUTION TROUBLE: What is the issue? ACTION: SETTING
  • 151. Passage B
    • 3. I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching, not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger.
  • 152.
    • 3.1 I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it.
    • 3.2 I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned.
    • 3.3 The stance had something of a pose to it.
    • 3.4 When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching, not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage.
    • 3.5 His ears twitched and then swivelled right around.
    • 3.6 One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger.
    In Paragraph 3, the narrator talks about his eye-to-eye staring encounter with the tiger.
  • 153. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. THE RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT FOR US TO RESPOND TO THIS QUESTION.
  • 154. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. THE RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT FOR US TO RESPOND TO THIS QUESTION.
  • 155. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. looked at To flinch – to make a sudden facial or body movement as a result of pain, fear or surprise. BE CAREFUL IN YOUR SELECTION OF OWN WORDS. YOU MUST USE THEM IN THIS QUESTION.
  • 156. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. looked at BE CAREFUL IN YOUR SELECTION OF OWN WORDS. YOU MUST USE THEM IN THIS QUESTION. The stare of the tiger was intense . The stare was cold . The stare was unflinching . The stare was not flighty . The stare was unfriendly . The stare was exploding with rage . NEEDLESS TO SAY, YOU CANNOT USE ANY ONE OF THE ABOVE EXPRESSIONS.
  • 157. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. looked at The stare of the tiger was intense . The stare was cold . The stare was unflinching . The stare was not flighty . The stare was unfriendly . The stare was exploding with rage . SO YOU HAVE TO ASK YOURSELF INTELLIGENTLY: What makes the tiger’s stare intense, cold, not flighty, unfriendly and exploding with rage? CHARACTERISTICS / QUALITIES / PERSONALITY/ WHAT DO YOU ASSOCIATE A TIGER WITH MOST?
  • 158. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. SO YOU HAVE TO ASK YOURSELF INTELLIGENTLY: What makes the tiger’s stare intense, cold, not flighty, unfriendly and exploding with rage? and try to link all these to “unflinching”. ASK AGAIN: What is “cold and unflinching”? CHARACTERISTICS / QUALITIES / PERSONALITY/ WHAT DO YOU ASSOCIATE A TIGER WITH MOST?
  • 159. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld the tiger from the angle that showed him off to the greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it. When the tiger’s eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching , not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall coyly revealing the yellow canine which was as long as my longest finger. ASK AGAIN: What is “cold and unflinching”? The tiger’s nature appears to be steadfast. It does not seem to be easily shaken or weakened or affected by change in the situation or Environment. CHARACTERISTICS / QUALITIES / PERSONALITY/ WHAT DO YOU ASSOCIATE A TIGER WITH MOST?
  • 160. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    ASK AGAIN: What is “cold and unflinching”? The tiger’s nature appears to be steadfast. It does not seem to be easily shaken or weakened or affected by change in the situation or environment.
  • 161. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature ? [1m]
    ASK AGAIN: What is “cold and unflinching”? The tiger’s nature appears to be steadfast. It does not seem to be easily shaken or weakened or affected by change in the situation or environment.
  • 162. From Passage B Paragraph 3
    • 9. What does the word “unflinching” suggest about the tiger’s nature? [1m]
    • Acceptable answers: bold / fearless / focused / undeterred / unperturbed / not bothered / not scared easily / unwavering / determined / not afraid / fearless / confident / steady
    • Unacceptable answers: cold / unfeeling / merciless / ruthless / fierce / aggressive / menacing personality / calm / serious
    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS THE ORIGINAL SETTER’S MARKING SCHEME.
  • 163. ALSO NOTE THE FOLLOWING FROM THE ORIGINAL SETTER / MARKER:
    • As the tiger is a wild animal, many of its responses during an attack on its prey is instinctive rather than emotional. Hence the acceptable answers are based on OBSERVABLE (remember in the passage: I beheld… ) behaviour rather than EMOTIONAL RESPONSES.
  • 164. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 9 It suggests that the tiger showed no emotion and that it was not sad or remorseful over killing the hyena. It also shows me that the tiger does not have a heart. Angelina The tiger is focus and patient. Aaron The word suggests that the tiger had a fearless nature. Sarah It suggested that the tiger’s nature is stern and not afraid. Cynthia Song It tells me that the tiger has a steady and composed nature. Clara Ng
  • 165. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 9 It suggests that the tiger was not afraid of the author. Esther Soh The word “unflinching” suggest that the tiger looked fierce and not moving, staying in an erect position. Shakinah The word “unflinching” suggest that the tiger is steadfast. Charis Soh The tiger’s nature is very scary that can make the person that the tiger is staring at unable to move or paralysed with fear. Shahlehin The tiger is very defensive. Victoria
  • 166. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 9 It suggest that the tiger is fierce in nature. Jie Hui The tiger is strong and determine in nature. Nurulhuda It suggest that the tiger is very fierce when it approaching the prey. Cogels Chan It suggests that the tiger was frightening in nature. Doreen Swee It suggests that the tiger was not intimidated by the author. Anna Lisa
  • 167. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 9
  • 168. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 9 It means it never flinch. Daniel Tan No feelings towards the prey. Terrence Chew The word ‘unflinching’ suggest to me that the tiger is serious in nature. Jia Jun It means that the tiger is serious and calm. Muhaimin The word ‘unflinching’ suggests that the tiger is heartless, and cold blooded. Joleen Tan
  • 169. Passage B
    • 4. Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. Nervous and breathless, the rat leapt onto the tarpaulin and raced my way. At the sight, in shock and surprise, my legs gave way beneath me and I practically fell onto the deck. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life.
  • 170.
    • 4.1 Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear.
    • 4.2 That was when the rat appeared.
    • 4.3 Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger.
    • 4.4 The tiger looked as astonished as I was.
    • 4.5 Nervous and breathless, the rat leapt onto the tarpaulin and raced my way.
    • 4.6 At the sight, in shock and surprise, my legs gave way beneath me and I practically fell onto the deck.
    • 4.7 Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life.
    In Paragraph 4 - 6, the narrator continues to talk about his eye-to-eye staring encounter with the tiger.
  • 171. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words. [1m]
    • Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
  • 172. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words. [1m]
    4. Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. Nervous and breathless, the rat leapt onto the tarpaulin and raced my way. At the sight, in shock and surprise, my legs gave way beneath me and I practically fell onto the deck. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT IR RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT IR RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT
  • 173. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words . [1m]
    4. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT STEP ONE Read the question carefully. STEP TWO UYOW question but worry about this later. STEP THREE Identify the STEP FOUR Write out the answer NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS first.
  • 174. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words . [1m]
    4. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. STEP FOUR Write out the answer NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS first.
  • 175. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words . [1m]
    … . the rat appeared. … out of nowhere, on the side bench nearest to the tiger. STEP FOUR Write out the answer NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS first.
  • 176. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words . [1m]
    The tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat BECAUSE it appeared out of nowhere, on the side bench nearest to the tiger. STEP FOUR Write out the answer NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS first.
  • 177. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words . [1m]
    The tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat BECAUSE it appeared out of nowhere, on the side bench nearest to the tiger. STEP FIVE Write out the answer IN YOUR OWN WORDS . The tiger and the author were astonished to see the rat BECAUSE it turned up unexpectedly on the side bench closest to the tiger. ORIGINAL TEXT USE YOUR OWN WORDS
  • 178. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • Explain why the tiger and author were astonished to see the rat. Answer in your own words. [1m]
    • Lifted from passage:
    • It materialised out of nowhere.
    • Materialised – appeared / came into view / sight
    • Nowhere – unexpectedly / all of a sudden / out of the blue / suddenly
  • 179. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 10 They were astonished as both author and tiger were staring intensely at each other. Nothing was surrounding their thoughts until the rat appeared out of the blue. Anna Lisa They were astonished to see the rat as they didn’t know that the rat was there camouflaged the bench. Charis Soh The tiger and author were astonished to see the rat because it came out randomly. Shakinah The tiger and the author were suprised that a rat just came out of nowhere and even gave the author a fright, making him nervous. Shahlehin The author and the tiger did not expect to see a rat there and furthermore it came out of nowhere. Angelina
  • 180. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 10 They were atonished because the rat suddenly appeared unknowingly and they are shocked o see it. Jie Hui The rat came out of a sudden. Nurulhuda Despite of the frightening situation and scene, the rat was still brave enough to go near the tiger. Doreen Swee The tiger spotted the rat and preparing for the hunt while the author was shocked to see the tiger staring at him. Cogels Chan Both the author and the tiger had not expected the rat to come out of its hiding place. Esther Soh
  • 181. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 10
  • 182. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 10 The tiger thought of killing the author to have his meal but the rat came out of nowhere and hence the tiger wanted both of them so it was astonished. The author was astonished because luck was with him he could use the rat to save his dear life. Ain The rat came out so suddenly and it was when the tiger wanted to kill the author. Terrence Chew They were surpise to see a rat appeared – out of nowhere. Daniel Tan The rat disrupts the intense atmosphere between the author and the tiger. Cheng Xiang The author did not expect to see a rat and thought that the tiger would attack the rat instead. Shi Hui
  • 183. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    4. Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. Nervous and breathless, the rat leapt onto the tarpaulin and raced my way. At the sight, in shock and surprise, my legs gave way beneath me and I practically fell onto the deck. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT
  • 184. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    4. Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear. That was when the rat appeared. Out of nowhere, a scrawny brown rat materialised on the side bench nearest to the tiger. The tiger looked as astonished as I was. Nervous and breathless, the rat leapt onto the tarpaulin and raced my way. At the sight, in shock and surprise, my legs gave way beneath me and I practically fell onto the deck. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT IRRELEVANT AREA OF TEXT
  • 185. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    4. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. RELEVANT AREA FOR YOU TO CONSTRUCT YOUR ANSWER RELEVANT AREA OF TEXT 4. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life.
  • 186. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    RELEVANT AREA FOR YOU TO CONSTRUCT YOUR ANSWER 4. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. 4. Before my incredulous eyes the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life.
  • 187. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    RELEVANT AREA FOR YOU TO CONSTRUCT YOUR ANSWER 4. Before my incredulous eye the rodent hopped over the various parts of the raft, jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, where I felt its little claws clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. 4. The rodent jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life.
  • 188. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    4. The rodent jumped onto me and climbed to the top of my head, clamping down on my scalp, holding on for dear life. The rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its calp probably because it must have thought it was the safest spot to run away from the tiger.
  • 189. From Passage B Paragraph 4
    • 11. Suggest why the rat headed for the top of the author’s head and clamped down on its scalp? [1m]
    • The rat wanted to get as far away as possible from the tiger. [1m]
    • The author’s head was the furthest point from the tiger. [1m]
    • To hide far away / get far away from the tiger [1m]
    • WRONG RESPONSES: [X]
    • The rat thought the author could offer it protection.
    • It was the furthest point from the water.
    • The author would protect the rat.
    • So that the tiger would eat the author instead of the rat.
    • The rat depended on the author to save its life.
    • The author’s head was flat and stable.
    • The rat could hide from the author’s head.
  • 190. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 11
  • 191. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 11
  • 192. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 11 The author’s head was the body part furthest from the tiger and should it approach anywhere near the head, the rat just had to jump down to scurry away. Sze Yan The rate was scared being close to the tiger which just killed a hyena. Macric Koh The rat is trying to distract the tiger. Say Kiat The rat is trying to protect its own life. Kai Jie It was afraid of the tiger and did not want to be killed by it. Kenny Tan
  • 193. Passage B
    • 5. The tiger’s eyes had followed the rat. They were now fixed on my head. He completed the turn of his head with a slow turn of his body, moving his forepaws sideways along the side bench. He dropped to the floor of the boat with ponderous ease. I could see the top of his head, his back and his long, curled tail. In three paces, he was now at the middle of the boat. He was less than ten feet away. His head, his chest, his paws – so big! His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth. He was making to jump onto the tarpaulin and I thought about that this time. I was really going to die. However, the tarpaulin’s strange softness bothered him. He pressed at it tentatively. The rolling motion of the boat continued to unsettle him. For a brief moment, the tiger was hesitating.
  • 194.
    • 5.1 The tiger’s eyes had followed the rat.
    • 5.2 They were now fixed on my head.
    • 5.3 He completed the turn of his head with a slow turn of his body, moving his forepaws sideways along the side bench.
    • 5.4 He dropped to the floor of the boat with ponderous ease.
    • 5.5 I could see the top of his head, his back and his long, curled tail.
    • 5.6 In three paces, he was now at the middle of the boat.
    • 5.7 He was less than ten feet away.
    • 5.8 His head, his chest, his paws – so big! His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth.
    • 5.9 He was making to jump onto the tarpaulin and I thought about that this time.
    • 5.10 I was really going to die.
    • 5.11 However, the tarpaulin’s strange softness bothered him.
    • 5.12 He pressed at it tentatively.
    • 5.13 The rolling motion of the boat continued to unsettle him.
    • 5.14 For a brief moment, the tiger was hesitating.
  • 195. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • Which two words in the paragraph have the same meaning as “disconcerted”? [2m]
    • Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? [2m]
  • 196. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • Which two words in the paragraph have the same meaning as “disconcerted”? [2m]
    5. The tiger’s eyes had followed the rat. They were now fixed on my head. He completed the turn of his head with a slow turn of his body, moving his forepaws sideways along the side bench. He dropped to the floor of the boat with ponderous ease. I could see the top of his head, his back and his long, curled tail. In three paces, he was now at the middle of the boat. He was less than ten feet away. His head, his chest, his paws – so big! His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth. He was making to jump onto the tarpaulin and I thought about that this time. I was really going to die. However, the tarpaulin’s strange softness bothered him. He pressed at it tentatively. The rolling motion of the boat continued to unsettle him. For a brief moment, the tiger was hesitating. “ Concerted” - planned or devised together; done or performed together or in cooperation “ Disconcerted” – confused, bewildered
  • 197. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • Which two words in the paragraph have the same meaning as “disconcerted”? [2m]
    • Bothered [1m] and unsettle . [1m]
    • Unacceptable:
    • Hesitating / ponderous / tentatively
  • 198. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 12
  • 199. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 12
  • 200. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 12 The two words are “tentatively” and “hesitating”. Kenny Tan The two words is “ponderous” and “unsettle”. Stamford The two words are “unsettle” and “bothered”. Shehan The two words are “unsettle” and “hesitating”. Siew Hui The two words is “dropped” and “ponderous”. “ Ponderous” means “boring” / “very serious” / “slowly progressing”. Aldrich Chew
  • 201. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • 13.Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? [2m]
    5. The tiger’s eyes had followed the rat. They were now fixed on my head. He completed the turn of his head with a slow turn of his body, moving his forepaws sideways along the side bench. He dropped to the floor of the boat with ponderous ease. I could see the top of his head, his back and his long, curled tail. In three paces, he was now at the middle of the boat. He was less than ten feet away. His head, his chest, his paws – so big! His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth. He was making to jump onto the tarpaulin and I thought about that this time. I was really going to die. However, the tarpaulin’s strange softness bothered him. He pressed at it tentatively. The rolling motion of the boat continued to unsettle him. For a brief moment, the tiger was hesitating. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT
  • 202. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • 13.Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? [2m]
    5. The tiger’s eyes had followed the rat. They were now fixed on my head. He completed the turn of his head with a slow turn of his body, moving his forepaws sideways along the side bench. He dropped to the floor of the boat with ponderous ease. I could see the top of his head, his back and his long, curled tail. In three paces, he was now at the middle of the boat. He was less than ten feet away. His head, his chest, his paws – so big! His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth. He was making to jump onto the tarpaulin and I thought about that this time. I was really going to die. However, the tarpaulin’s strange softness bothered him. He pressed at it tentatively. The rolling motion of the boat continued to unsettle him. For a brief moment, the tiger was hesitating.
  • 203. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • 13.Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? [2m]
    His teeth – an entire army battalion in a mouth.
  • 204. From Passage B Paragraph 5
    • 13.Explain fully what the author meant by, “an entire army battalion in a mouth”? [2m]
    • There are many teeth / teeth are like sharp weapons [1m] and they seem ready to pounce and do battle / able to inflict serious damage/deadly. [1m]
    • UNACCEPTABLE: Powerful
  • 205. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 13
  • 206. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 13
  • 207. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 13 He meant that the tiger’s teeth were menacing and threatening as though he were facing an entire army battalion but in a mouth. Sze Yan The author was shocked by how many teeth the tiger had. ‘An entire army battalion in a mouth’ suggested that there is a lot of teeth in its mouth. Macric Koh “ An entire army battalion in a mouth” meant that the tiger was ready to attack both the rat and author with a huge appetite as it was ready to leap onto the boat with determination. Jeshere Lim The tiger’s mouth was filled with large and razor sharp teeth that looked as if it has the ability to tear apart anything it lays paws on, just like how an army has many sharp and strong weapons to pierce anything it strikes. Abel Yeo The teeth looks as if it was the entire army and there was also noise being produced that sounds like a huge group of army battalion that was ready to attack. Kenny Tan
  • 208. From Passage B Paragraph 6
    • 14. What did the author liken the tiger’s mouth to? [1m]
    I grabbed the rat and threw it his way. I can still see it in my mind as it sailed through the air – its outstretched claws and erect tail. The tiger opened his maw and the squealing rat disappeared into it like a baseball into a catcher’s mitt. Its hairless tail vanished like a spaghetti noodle sucked into a mouth. Seemingly satisfied with the offering, he backed down and returned beneath the tarpaulin. My legs instantly became functional again. I leapt up and raised the locker lid again to block the open space between the bow where he was and the tarpaulin which was to be my refuge for the rest of the journey. RELEVANT AREA OF THE TEXT
  • 209. The tiger’s maw I grabbed the rat and threw it his way. I can still see it in my mind as it sailed through the air – its outstretched claws and erect tail. The tiger opened his maw and the squealing rat disappeared into it like a baseball into a catcher’s mitt. Its hairless tail vanished like a spaghetti noodle sucked into a mouth. Seemingly satisfied with the offering, he backed down and returned beneath the tarpaulin. My legs instantly became functional again. I leapt up and raised the locker lid again to block the open space between the bow where he was and the tarpaulin which was to be my refuge for the rest of the journey. Tarpaulin
  • 210. COMPARISON
    • The tiger’s maw
    • refers to its mouth
    • or throat.
    The baseball players’ mitt The tiger’s maw catches its prey The catcher’s mitt catches the baseball.
  • 211. From Passage B Paragraph 6
    • 14.What did the author liken the tiger’s mouth to? [1m]
    • It was likened to a catcher’s mitt. [1m]
    • Unacceptable:
    • A baseball going into a catcher’s mitt.
  • 212. Selected 4B students’ responses to Question 14
  • 213. Selected 4D students’ responses to Question 14
  • 214. Selected 5B students’ responses to Question 14 The authour liken the tiger’s mouth to rat. Say Kiat The author liken the tiger’s mouth to an army. Kai Jie It was like “a catcher’s mitt”. Kenny Tan The author compared the tiger’s mouth to “an entire army battalion”. Abel Yeo The author liken the tiger’s mouth to a rat. Ibrahim
  • 215. Passage B
    • 6. I grabbed the rat and threw it his way. I can still see it in my mind as it sailed through the air – its outstretched claws and erect tail. The tiger opened his maw and the squealing rat disappeared into it like a baseball into a catcher’s mitt. Its hairless tail vanished like a spaghetti noodle sucked into a mouth. Seemingly satisfied with the offering, he backed down and returned beneath the tarpaulin. My legs instantly became functional again. I leapt up and raised the locker lid again to block the open space between the bow where he was and the tarpaulin which was to be my refuge for the rest of the journey.
  • 216.
    • 6.1 I grabbed the rat and threw it his way.
    • 6.2 I can still see it in my mind as it sailed through the air – its outstretched claws and erect tail.
    • 6.3 The tiger opened his maw and the squealing rat disappeared into it like a baseball into a catcher’s mitt.
    • 6.4 Its hairless tail vanished like a spaghetti noodle sucked into a mouth.
    • 6.5 Seemingly satisfied with the offering, he backed down and returned beneath the tarpaulin.
    • 6.6 My legs instantly became functional again.
    • 6.7 I leapt up and raised the locker lid again to block the open space between the bow (the front part of the boat) where he was and the tarpaulin which was to be my refuge for the rest of the journey.
  • 217. COMPARISON
    • The tiger’s maw
    • refers to its mouth
    • or throat.
    The baseball players’ mitt The tiger’s maw catches its prey The catcher’s mitt catches the baseball.
  • 218. From Passages A and B
    • For each of the following words or phrases, give one word or short phrase (of not more than seven words) which has the same meaning as the word or phrase in the passage. [5m]
    • Passage A:
    • plethora
    • affluent
    • fuelled
    • Passage B:
    • tentatively
    • offering
  • 219. Unacceptable: Amount / mixture / variety Excess Large number Multitude Myriad [idea of large quantity and not variety]
    • Plethora
    • [Passage A]
  • 220. Unacceptable: Established Well off Well to do Rich Wealthy [idea of being rich]
    • Affluent
    • [Passage A]
  • 221. Unacceptable: Run / brought about / caused / driven / powered / motivated / promoted / propelled / sped up / enhanced Make worse / stimulated / encouraged / contributed / boosted / supported / intensified / made stronger [idea of making something stronger and not causing something else to happen]
    • Fuelled
    • [Passage A]
  • 222. Unacceptable: For a moment / slowly / momentarily / carefully / cautiously Unsure Hesitantly Unsurely Gingerly Uncertain [idea of uncertainty and not caution]
    • Tentatively
    • [Passage B]
  • 223. Unacceptable: Meal Food Appeasement Gift Sacrifice Tribute
    • Offering
    • [Passage B]
  • 224. From Passage A
    • Using your own words as far as possible, summarise the reasons for the demise of the tiger and the measures taken to save the tiger. [25m]
    • USE ONLY THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE A FROM PARAGRAPHS 3 TO 8.
    • Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin).
    • Begin your summary as follows: The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are…
    • END OF PAPER
  • 225. SUMMARY TRY YOUR BEST WHEN YOU ARE SURE THAT YOUR OWN WORDS ARE RELEVANT AND ACCURATE MADE SURE YOU KNOW: EXPOSITORY PASSAGE – PRESENT TENSE NARRATIVE – PAST TENSE GET THE RELEVANT POINTS FIRST . SECURE 13 – 18 POINTS AT LEAST. USE OF OWN WORDS = 10/10 GRAMMAR And STYLE = 10/10 CONTENT POINTS = 15/15
  • 226. From Passage A
    • Using your own words as far as possible, summarise the reasons for the demise of the tiger and the measures taken to save the tiger. [25m]
    • USE ONLY THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE A FROM PARAGRAPHS 3 TO 8.
    • Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin).
    • Begin your summary as follows: The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are…
    • END OF PAPER
  • 227.
    • Passage A
    3. The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a symbol of high status and wealth. Some remedies list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only trace elements; but even these are enough to promote the continued slaughter of the tiger. In addition, in recent years there has been resurgence in traditional practices fundamental to the history of Chinese society. This has been fuelled by cultural pride. There is also a growing sentiment that western medicine contains some shortcomings in treating illness. Furthermore, new communities around the globe including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, igniting the demand for tiger parts beyond what can be supplied.
  • 228.
    • Passage A
    4. The popularity of tiger bones as a remedy for a multitude of ailments has produced a thriving black market, which is very difficult to monitor. Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be crushed and made odourless and can be disguised as other types of bones. Tiger derivatives that are confiscated in raids by government officials are therefore believed to be just the tip of the iceberg.
  • 229.
    • Passage A
    5. The trade in tiger parts is thought to have intensified as a result of a rapid increase in the demand for traditional Chinese medicine in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea. Despite the acceptance of new trade policies in China, it still remains a principle player in the demise of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up enforcement efforts since coming under pressure from the United States in 1993-1994.
  • 230.
    • Passage A
    6. However, such policing efforts in Asian countries touch only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As the demand for tiger products continues to grow, and poaching is still prominent in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be implemented to curb both the supply and the demand for endangered tiger parts.
  • 231.
    • Passage A
    7. Many of the tiger-range countries’ governments have established legal provisions to protect the endangered tiger. In addition, most tiger countries are members of CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which bans the trade of tiger parts (the exceptions are Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal structures, political commitment, and financial resources severely limit domestic enforcement efforts.
  • 232.
    • Passage A
    8. Despite legislation banning hunting, the staff employed to protect tigers in “protected areas” often are not legally empowered to enforce anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or confiscating hunting weapons, arresting or prosecuting poachers, or even carrying guns to protect the tigers, as well as themselves, from poachers.
  • 233. Summary as written by examiner
    • The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are numerous. Firstly, the use of tiger products is considered a representation of social standing and affluence. Even tiny amounts of tiger products are sufficient to encourage the killing of tigers. Recent years have seen the re-emergence of traditional acts propelled by cultural pride. There is an increasing view that western medicine is ineffective. New communities worldwide are adding traditional Chinese medicines to western ones, thus overextending the need for tiger parts. There is a flourishing black market as tiger bones are camouflaged as other bones. A spike in need for Chinese medicine in some Asian countries is another reason. Countries like Taiwan have increased enforcement efforts but such monitoring efforts only involve some medicine stores. Proprietors often hear of a “raid” in time to conceal or scatter tiger parts. Poaching is still rampant in many countries. Numerous tiger-range countries have set laws to safeguard tigers. They are members of CITES.
    • Word count: 150 excluding the ten given words.
    • No. of points: 16
  • 234. MY POINT ORGANISER Amongst them are members of CITES which forbid the trading of tiger parts. Many governments who deal with considerable tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. The measures taken to save the tiger This is also boosted by the recent re-emergence of basic Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride. Although these medicines may have only very little bit of tiger-related ingredients in them, the demand for them is incentive enough to promote the continued killing of the tiger. Traditional medicinal cures list tiger parts as an ingredient. Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. The reasons for the dying off (demise) of the tiger 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 B A
  • 235. MY POINT ORGANISER The measures taken to save the tiger Tiger bones can be crushed, deodourised, relabeled as other bones. The governments cannot effectively monitor the flourishing black market dealing in tiger bones. New global communities are adding traditional Chinese medicine treatments to western medicine. There is also a growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. The reasons for the dying off (demise) of the tiger 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 B A
  • 236. MY POINT ORGANISER The measures taken to save the tiger Vendors often effectively hide or disperse their tiger parts during raids. Policing efforts in Asia affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores. The increased demand in East Asia for traditional medicine strengthens the tiger parts business. Police raids on illegal tiger bone vendors affect only a small part of a large business. The reasons for the dying off (demise) of the tiger 12 12 11 11 10 10 9 9 B A
  • 237. MY POINT ORGANISER The measures taken to save the tiger The law enforcers in “protected areas” for tigers are often not given any real power to apprehend offenders. However, inadequate legal coverage, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken domestic policing efforts. Additional measures are needed to control the tiger parts business. Poaching is still very common in Asia. The reasons for the dying off (demise) of the tiger 16 16 15 15 14 14 13 13 B A
  • 238. MY POINT ORGANISER The measures taken to save the tiger They are restricted in many ways from performing effective law enforcement duties. The reasons for the dying off (demise) of the tiger 20 20 19 19 18 18 17 17 B A
  • 239. DRAFTING BEGINS Look at the HELPING WORDS to begin the summary. They are not often helpful but we have to use them. The factor s contributing to the demise of the tiger are… Since we have already uncovered so many reasons, we can afford to write in this way: The factor s contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows .
  • 240. DRAFTING BEGINS The factor s contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows . [A1] Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. [A2] Traditional medicinal cures list tiger parts as an ingredient. [A3] Although these medicines usually contain tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients in them, the demand for them is incentive enough to promote the continual killing. [A4] This is also boosted by the recent re-emergence of basic Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride [A5] and growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. [A6] New global communities are adding traditional Chinese medicine treatments to western medicine. [A7] Governments cannot effectively monitor the flourishing black market dealing in tiger bones. [A8] Tiger bones can be crushed, deodourised, relabeled as other bones. [A9] Police raids on illegal tiger bone sellers affect only a small part of a large business. [A10] The increased demand in East Asia for traditional medicine strengthens the tiger parts business. [A11] Policing efforts in Asia affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores. [A12] Sellers often effectively hide or disperse their tiger parts during raids. [A13] Poaching is still very common in Asia. [A14] Additional measures are needed to control the tiger parts business. [A15] Inadequate legal coverage, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken domestic policing efforts. [A16] The law enforcers in “protected areas” for tigers are often not given any real power to apprehend offenders. [A17] They are restricted in many ways from performing their duties. [B1] Many governments who deal with considerable tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. [B2] Some are members of CITES which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [244 words]
  • 241. DRAFTING BEGINS The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows. Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. Traditional medicinal cures list tiger parts as ingredients. The tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients in them are incentive enough to promote the continual killing. This is also boosted by the recent re-emergence of basic Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. New global communities are adding traditional Chinese medicine treatments to western medicine. Governments cannot effectively monitor the flourishing black markets. Tiger bones can be crushed, deodourised, relabeled as other bones. Police raids on illegal tiger bone sellers affect only a small part of a large business. The increased demand in East Asia for traditional medicine further strengthens the business. Policing efforts in Asia affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores. Sellers often effectively hide or disperse their stocks during raids. Poaching is still very common in Asia. Additional measures are needed to control the business. Inadequate legal coverage, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken domestic policing efforts. The law enforcers in “protected areas” for tigers are often not given any power to apprehend offenders, being restricted in many ways from performing their duties. Many governments who deal with considerable tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. Some are members of CITES which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [225 words]
  • 242. DRAFTING BEGINS The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows. Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. Tiger parts are medicinal ingredients. The tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients in medicines are incentive enough to promote the continual killing. This is also boosted by the recent re-emergence of basic Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. New communities are adding traditional Chinese medicine treatments to western medicine. Governments cannot effectively monitor the flourishing black markets. Tiger bones can be crushed, deodourised, relabeled as other bones. Police raids affect only a small part of a large business. The increased demand in East Asia for traditional medicine further strengthens the business. Policing efforts in Asia affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores. Sellers often hide or disperse their stocks during raids. Poaching is still very common in Asia. Additional measures are needed to control the business. Inadequate laws, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken such efforts. The law enforcers in tiger protection are often not given any power to apprehend offenders, being restricted in many ways from performing their duties. Many governments who deal with considerable tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. Some are members of CITES which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [211 words]
  • 243. DRAFTING BEGINS The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows. Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. Tiger parts are medicinal ingredients. The tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients in medicines are incentive enough to promote the continual killing. This is also boosted by the recent re-emergence of Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. New communities are adding Chinese medicine treatments to western medicine. Governments cannot effectively monitor the flourishing black markets. Tiger bones can be covered up as other bones. Policing affects only a small part of a large business. The increased demand in East Asia further strengthens the business. Sellers often hide or disperse their stocks during raids. Poaching is still very common in Asia. Inadequate laws, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken such efforts. The officials in tiger protection are often not given any power to apprehend offenders, being restricted in many ways from performing their duties. Governments who deal with considerable tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. Some are members of CITES which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [181 words]
  • 244. DRAFTING COMPLETED The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows. Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. The tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients are incentive enough to promote tiger killing. This is boosted by the recent re-emergence of Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. Governments cannot effectively monitor the black markets with policing efforts touching only a small part of a large business. Tiger bones can be rebranded as other bones. Sellers often hide or disperse their stocks during raids. The increased demand in East Asia further strengthens the business. Poaching is still very common in Asia. The officials in tiger protection are often not given any power to apprehend offenders, being restricted in many ways from performing their duties. Governments who deal with tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. Some are CITES members which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [150 words]
  • 245. DRAFTING COMPLETED The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are as follows. [A1] Consumption of tiger-related products and medicines signifies high status and wealth. [A3] The tiny bits of tiger-related ingredients are incentive enough to promote tiger killing. [A4] This is boosted by the recent re-emergence of Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and [A5] growing feeling that western medicine is not entirely efficacious. [A7] Governments cannot effectively monitor the black markets with [A8] police raids touching only a small part of a large business. [A9] Tiger bones can be rebranded as other bones. [A12] Sellers often hide or disperse their stocks during raids. [A10] The increased demand in East Asia further strengthens the business. [A13] Poaching is still very common in Asia. [A16] The officials in tiger protection are often not given any power to apprehend offenders, [A17] being restricted in many ways from performing their duties. [B1] Governments who deal with tiger populations establish laws to protect the tiger. [B2] Some are CITES members which forbid the trading of tiger parts. [150 words]
  • 246. DRAFTING BEGINS Total number of points – 14 points [but we have to bear in mind one important thing: We do not know what the examiner’s marking scheme is and so even if we may be one point short of 15, it really does not matter.] For example, I have treated [A4] This is boosted by the recent re-emergence of Chinese customary practices, driven by cultural pride and as one single point. The examiner may treat this as two as follows: [Pt1] This is boosted by the recent re-emergence of Chinese customary practices, [Pt 2] driven by cultural pride and So there is no need to worry yourselves sick over this.
  • 247.
    • The End of My Presentation of
    • PREPARATORY EXAMINATIONS 2010 at S.H.S.S.