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Careful reading with understanding   preparatory examinations passage a paragraphs 3 - 8 summary q 16
 

Careful reading with understanding preparatory examinations passage a paragraphs 3 - 8 summary q 16

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    Careful reading with understanding   preparatory examinations passage a paragraphs 3 - 8 summary q 16 Careful reading with understanding preparatory examinations passage a paragraphs 3 - 8 summary q 16 Document Transcript

    • REVISITING QUESTION 16: THE SUMMARY QUESTION T4W4.6 October 2010 in BTT and NSP for 5B.2010 prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee The use of endangered tiger products and their medicines is seen as a sign of high social position and wealth. Some medicinal cures list tiger parts as an ingredient, but the real animal parts are so expensive that often the medicines may have only very little bit of tiger-related ingredients in them; but even these are enough to promote the continued killing of the tiger. Recently there has also been re-emergence in basic customary practices which defines the history of Chinese society. This has been driven by cultural pride. There is also a growing feeling that western medicine contains some weaknesses in treating illness. Furthermore, new global communities including non-Asian communities are supplementing traditional Chinese medicine treatments into their western style of medicine, causing the demand for tiger parts to become bigger than what the sellers can supply to the customers. The popularity of tiger bones as a medical cure for many illnesses has created a busy and profitable illegal market, which is very difficult for the government to keep a lookout for. Unlike a tiger skin, tiger bones can be smashed and crunched and made to produce no giveaway smell and can be disguised as other types of bones. These products made from tiger parts which are taken away forcefully from the illegal sellers in police sweeps are thus thought to have revealed only a tiny part of an illegal business activity which has a much bigger scale. The business in tiger parts has become stronger because of a quickly growing rise in people’s needs for customary Chinese medicine in East Asian countries. Despite the introduction of new trade policies in the country, China is still a key culprit in causing the death of the tiger and other endangered species. Other countries such as Taiwan have stepped up policing efforts since coming under criticism from the United States in 1993-1994. But such policing efforts in Asian countries affect only a small percentage of Chinese medicine stores, and often owners get word of a “raid” in time to hide or disperse any tiger parts they may have in stock. As people’s need for tiger products continues to grow, and illegal hunting and killing is still very common in India, Russia and Southeast Asia, additional measures need to be taken up to control the trading of endangered tiger parts. Many governments who run countries with sizeable tiger populations have set up laws to protect the endangered tiger. Many tiger countries are also members of CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species) which forbid the buying and selling of tiger parts (excluding Burma, Lao PDR, and Cambodia). However, inadequate legal coverage, government involvement, and funds seriously weaken domestic policing efforts. Although there are laws which stop people from hunting, the manpower for protecting tigers in “protected areas” often are not given any real power to see that people actually obey anti-hunting laws. For example, they may be restricted from searching for or removing hunting weapons, arresting or taking illegal hunters to the courts, or even carrying guns to protect the tigers and themselves. Using your own words as far as possible, summarise the reasons for the demise of the tiger and the measures taken to save the tiger. [25m] USE ONLY THE MATERIAL IN PASSAGE A FROM PARAGRAPHS 3 TO 8. Your summary, which must be in continuous writing (not note form), must not be longer than 150 words (not counting the words given to help you begin). Begin your summary as follows: The factors contributing to the demise of the tiger are…
    • REVISITING QUESTION 16: THE SUMMARY QUESTION T4W4.6 October 2010 in BTT and NSP for 5B.2010 prepared by Yeo Yam Hwee