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Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
Professional Etiquette in the Workplace
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Professional Etiquette in the Workplace

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  • 1. Professional Etiquette in the Workplace University Career Center 1601 Irving Hill Road • Burge Union, 110 Lawrence, KS 66045 • 785-864-3624 KUCareerHawk.com • [email_address]
  • 2. Introductions
    • Introduce…
    • A younger person to an older person
    • A non-official person to an official person
    • In the professional world: the junior to the senior
    • Explain who people are and
    • use their full names
    • Don’t assume people want to be called by their first name—wait until you are told to use a first name
  • 3. Handshakes
    • Make a V with your thumb and forefinger
    • Extend your arm across your body
    • Not too hard or weak
    • Two pumps (approximately)
    • Make a good first impression
  • 4. Name Tags
    • Should be worn on the right hand side of your front shoulder area
    • If on a chord, should be in the upper middle of your chest
    • Pay attention to people’s names on their nametag when meeting them and use their name once you have been introduced
  • 5. Body Language
    • First impressions are extremely important - your initial meeting forms a lasting impression
    • Use good eye contact
    • Smiling is an important non-verbal behavior - it shows interest and approachability
    • Lean forward, look engaged in the conversation, don’t slouch
    • Look and act interested
  • 6. Business Attire: Professional
    • Women:
    • Conservative suit (dark colored)
    • Conservative blouse
    • Skirt (at least knee length) or pants
    • Hosiery
    • Conservative matching shoes
    • Conservative minimal
    • jewelry
    • Light on the make- up
    • Hair out of face
    • Men:
    • Conservative suit (dark colored)
    • Matching conservative collared shirt
    • Matching tie (basic)
    • Dark Shoes
    • Socks that match your suit
    • Jewelry: watch only
    • Clean cut: hair and face
  • 7. Business Attire: Casual
    • Nothing low cut, tight, or revealing
    • No jeans, t-shirts, sweatshirts, etc.
    • Use an iron!
    • Find out the dress code of your organization
    • Think conservative, but you can be more trendy than you can with business professional (usually)
  • 8. Socializing VS. Gossiping in the Work Place
    • Socializing:
    • Friendly conversation
    • Work related
    • Small talk (appropriate topics)
    • Anyone can hear it
    • Usually encouraged in small amounts
    • Helps with camaraderie among co-workers
    • Gossiping:
    • Not everyone can hear it
    • Usually potentially hurtful
    • Inappropriate topics
    • Can lead to trouble
    • Can lead to tension
    • Involves others as source of topics
    • Reminds you of junior high
    Tips: Stay away from cliques; be nice and friendly; volunteer to help out when you can; have appropriate fun; communicate with others
  • 9. Communication: General
    • Be nice and courteous- “please” and “thank you”
    • Listen
    • Don’t interrupt
    • Share information with colleagues-new resources, interesting articles, valuable information they need to know, etc.
    • Respond in the same form in which you were contacted: ex. voicemail to phone call, not email
    • Avoid sensitive topics: politics, religion, etc.
    • Avoid foul language, offensive terms/phrases
  • 10. Communication: Email
    • Your email address should be professional, not kuhotty@ku.edu
    • Be careful with personal emails/accounts at work; know the policy
    • Use proper grammar and punctuation in email
    • Watch the sarcasm! It’s hard to read through email
    • Avoid emoticons in professional correspondence
    • Have a signature attached to your emails with your title, contact information, etc.
    • Address people by Ms. or Mr. unless they have requested otherwise or used only their first name in their signature
  • 11. Communication: Phone
    • Keep a pen and paper by your phone to take notes
    • Speak clearly and at a moderate pace
    • Don’t eat or chew gum while talking to someone
    • Don’t talk in a public place on your mobile phone
    • Turn your mobile phone off!
    • Leave a message: state your name (spell if needed) and say your phone number, while you write it down
  • 12. Communication: Phone Continued
    • Monitor your personal message: Is it appropriate?
    • Always return messages (be timely-aim for within 24 hours)
    • Avoid texting at work while in a meeting
    • If your boss texts you, make sure you check your messages for spelling and grammar before sending your response
    • Personal calls at work—be careful and know the rules
  • 13. University Career Center 1601 Irving Hill Road ● Burge Union, Room 110 ● Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-3624 ● KUCareerHawk.com

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