What is occupational therapy?
Occupational therapy is a health care profession that focuses on helping people of all ages regain, develop, or master eve...
What qualities or traits are useful in practicing occupational therapy?
Personal Qualities or Traits <ul><li>Enjoy helping people </li></ul><ul><li>Strong communication skills </li></ul><ul><li>...
What are the educational requirements for a career in occupational therapy?
Educational Requirements: Occupational Therapist <ul><li>Postbaccalaureate Degree </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Entry-level Master...
Educational Requirements: Occupational Therapy Assistant <ul><li>Associate’s Degree </li></ul><ul><li>Supervised Fieldwork...
Prerequisite Requirements <ul><li>Biology </li></ul><ul><li>Human Anatomy & Physiology </li></ul><ul><li>Abnormal Psycholo...
How do I learn which  colleges and universities  offer occupational therapy education programs?
Accredited Educational Programs <ul><li>In order to become an occupational therapy practitioner, you must graduate from an...
Further Information <ul><li>Visit the Prospective Students section of the AOTA Web site at   http://www.aota.org/Students/...
Where do occupational  therapy practitioners work?
As an OT practitioner, I could work in physical disabilities… <ul><li>Hospitals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Acute care </li></ul...
As an OT practitioner, I could work in mental health… <ul><li>Psychiatric facilities </li></ul><ul><li>Psychiatric units i...
As an OT practitioner, I could work in pediatrics… <ul><li>Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Pediatric units in hospitals </li></u...
As an OT practitioner, I could work in academics & research… <ul><li>Academics & research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach in a...
As an OT practitioner, I could work in specialty areas such as… <ul><li>Hand therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Driver rehabilitati...
What is the job outlook for occupational therapy?
Job Outlook:  Occupational Therapists <ul><li>Employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase 23% between 20...
Earnings:  Occupational Therapists <ul><li>Median annual earnings of occupational therapists were $66,780 in May 2008.  </...
Workforce Trends: Occupational Therapists-May 2008 Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291122.ht...
Job Outlook: Occupational Therapy Assistants <ul><li>Employment of occupational therapy assistants is expected to grow 25%...
Earnings: Occupational Therapy Assistants <ul><li>Median annual earnings of occupational therapy assistants were $48,230 i...
Workforce Trends: Occupational Therapy Assistants-May 2008 Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes3...
Does occupational therapy offer opportunities for individuals of culturally  diverse backgrounds?
Cultural Diversity in the Occupational Therapy Profession <ul><li>The occupational therapy profession is actively seeking ...
Whom is helped by  occupational therapy?
Parent’s Perspective “ I have learned a lot from being part of the OT sessions and have learned to view everyday objects a...
Parent’s Perspective “ OT was one of the few therapies that produced an immediate calm. It was something he looked forward...
Client’s Perspective “ I began working with an occupational therapy practitioner first as an inpatient and then as an outp...
Client’s Perspective <ul><li>“ The therapist tried to customize the program so that in her professional judgment would hel...
What does an occupational therapy practitioner’s day actually look like? A glance into the everyday  tasks of a few practi...
A day in the life of… Penny Donehoo, MS, OTR/L  School-based Pediatrics <ul><li>This OT uses these types of activities for...
A day in the life of… Alejandro Cuevas, Jr., BA, COTA/L  Adult Physical Disabilities <ul><li>This OTA uses these types of ...
A day in the life of… Mary Michaelsen, OTR/L Mental Health <ul><li>This OT uses these types of groups for treatment: </li>...
A day in the life of… Brent Braveman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Education and Research <ul><li>This OT is involved in these types ...
What is the future of occupational therapy? 2017: A Century of Occupational Therapy
AOTA’s Centennial Vision <ul><li>&quot;We envision that occupational therapy is a powerful, widely recognized, science-dri...
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A Career in Occupational Therapy

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  • Young or old, we all have a job to do - the job of living. Learning, growing, playing, working, managing our homes, and caring for our families are among the “occupations” of life. Unfortunately, physical, emotional, or other challenges often prevent people from fully participating in the job of living. Disease, injury, mental illness, or developmental problems can make it difficult for people to do everyday tasks or be active and independent. Occupational therapy - a vibrant and growing profession - makes it possible for people to achieve independence and to enjoy life to its fullest. By choosing a career in occupational therapy, you will make a difference! You will be able to improve the lives of people of all ages, from newborns to the very old. In this presentation, we will explore some of the questions you may have about choosing a career in occupational therapy including: What is occupational therapy? How do I find out about the educational requirements for a career in occupational therapy? What is the job outlook for occupational therapy? Where could I work and what could I do as an occupational therapy practitioner? We’ll start with the definition of occupational therapy.
  • What exactly is occupational therapy?
  • Occupational therapy is a health care profession that focuses on helping people – The practice of occupational therapy means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities - or “occupations” - with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, work place, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in every day life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life (AOTA Practice Framework definition).
  • People who choose occupational therapy as a career are those who enjoy helping and working with others. Occupational therapy practitioners need to have strong communication skills, as well as strong interpersonal skills to inspire trust and respect in their clients. Creativity, flexibility and problem-solving skills are assets.
  • There are two different types of occupational therapy practitioners: occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants. The educational requirements for each differ in terms of prerequisite requirements, level of education, and required coursework. This part of the presentation will explain the educational requirements for both occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants.
  • An entry-level degree for occupational therapists is the degree required to enter the profession and to be eligible to sit for the Occupational Therapist Registered (OTR) examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). Occupational therapy requires that the entry-level degree be a postbaccalaureate degree. Occupational therapist entry-level degrees are either master’s or doctoral degrees. Students who have successfully completed an accredited entry-level degree program may be eligible to sit for the national certification examination as an occupational therapist. Please refer to individual institutions offering occupational therapist entry-level degree programs for details and prerequisite information. Whether in an entry-level master’s or entry-level doctoral degree program, occupational therapy students are required to complete two levels of supervised fieldwork in addition to completing the required coursework. Sample courses include those listed on the slide.
  • Preparing for a career as an occupational therapy assistant requires completion of a 2-year associate’s degree. Courses may include medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, psychology, rehabilitation theory, and gerontology. You will also be required to complete supervised fieldwork in clinics or community organizations to gain hands-on experience before completing your program, as well as pass a national certification exam.
  • If you are interested in applying to an occupational therapy program, you must obtain specific requirements, prerequisites, and program content from the schools to which you are applying. Both occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant candidates will be required to fulfill a number of prerequisites, which may include the coursework listed in the slide. The prerequisites do not need to be from the schools that you are applying too. Most programs also require volunteer or paid work experience with persons with disabilities.
  • In order to become an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant, you must graduate from an accredited occupational therapy education program. A list of more than 300 accredited entry-level occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant education programs are listed on the AOTA Web site. Go to http://www.aota.org/Students/Schools.aspx to find out which schools are accredited. Beginning in 2011, there will be a centralized application system where you can fill out one application and have it sent to multiple participating schools. This is only for occupational therapist programs.
  • The American Occupational Therapy Association Web site offers several informational links for prospective students including a list of frequently asked questions, new graduate vignettes, and live chat discussions. Visit the Web site to learn more.
  • Students today can look forward to dynamic careers working in multiple settings with people of all ages. Broad areas of practice include physical disabilities, mental health, pediatrics, and academics and research. New areas of practice are emerging and developing as well. In almost all areas of practice, occupational therapy practitioners work on interdisciplinary teams, which means that they may collaborate with doctors, physical therapists, social workers, nurses, or a number of other professionals depending on the setting.
  • As an occupational therapy practitioner in the area of physical disabilities, you could work in a hospital. This could mean working with an acute care population, for example, people who have recently experienced a stroke or heart attack, or who have been in a motor vehicle accident. Working in a hospital could mean working in inpatient rehabilitation, in other words, with people who may be medically stable but require therapy before going home. Another kind of hospital setting is a specialty unit within a larger hospital, or even a free-standing hospital dedicated to specific diagnoses such as spinal cord injury. Occupational therapy practitioners can work in nursing homes, which include two different types of settings. In skilled nursing facilities, patients may not be able to tolerate the intensive therapy of a hospital, or they may have chronic health issues such as dementia. In intermediate care facilities, patients may not have acute medical needs but require some supervision, as is the case with some people with intellectual or developmental disabilities. In home health, occupational therapy practitioners work with adults or children who live at home but need therapy services. Work rehabilitation may occur on-site at a place of employment or at a work hardening clinic, and occupational therapy practitioners may work in either of these settings. Keep in mind that in any physical disabilities setting, you are also likely to encounter patients with cognitive disabilities or psychosocial needs.
  • In the area of mental health, you could work in facilities that serve people with psychiatric illnesses. This includes free-standing psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units that are part of larger general hospitals. Often there are separate units for adults and adolescents or children. Many psychiatric facilities have both inpatient and outpatient programming. Occupational therapy practitioners can work in community mental health programs. For example, some community mental health programs are day programs for people with mental illnesses, housing programs that are designed specifically for people with substance use disorders or AIDS, or other community agencies that serve people with mental health needs. Occupational therapy practitioners may work in specialty areas within nursing homes, for example in a dementia unit.
  • As a school occupational therapy practitioner, you could work with school-aged children in a classroom or separate therapy room during the school day. As an occupational therapy practitioner, you could work in a pediatric unit in a hospital. This could mean working on a general pediatric floor, or working in a specific unit such as oncology (or cancer), a burn unit, or neonatal intensive care (known as a NICU). Occupational therapy practitioners also work in outpatient clinics. These clinics may be hospital-based or private clinics. As an occupational therapy practitioner in private practice, you could “be your own boss,” or work for someone who runs a private pediatric practice. This could mean working at a clinic or therapy center, doing home visits, or both. Early intervention is a specific area of pediatric practice in which occupational therapy practitioners work with infants and toddlers up to their third birthday. In order to keep children in their natural settings, therapy may take place in the home or other familiar community settings.
  • With an occupational therapy background, you could work in the areas of academics, research, or both. For example, some people work as educators in occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant educational programs. Others may spend part of their time doing therapy with clients and part of their time instructing in one of these programs. Still others choose to teach and do research in the field of occupational therapy.
  • Some occupational therapy practitioners work in specialty areas that require either advanced training or a specialty certification. Some examples are hand therapy, driver rehabilitation, low vision rehabilitation, wheelchair seating, assistive technology, and design &amp; accessibility consultation for playgrounds, schools, or businesses. Occupational therapy continues to branch out into different settings. By the time you graduate, occupational therapy practitioners will probably be working in even more places!
  • The job outlook for occupational therapy practitioners is bright! In the next few slides, we will explore workforce trends and earnings for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants.
  • Reasons for growth and the need for more OT’s: Baby-boom generation’s movement into middle age Baby-boomer’s enter into a period when the incidence of heart attack and stroke increases; this may result in living with chronic physical and/or cognitive impairments, while still wanting to maintain the quality of life they were accustomed to prior to the injury. Aging of the population age 75 and older: Suffers from high incidences of chronic disabling conditions, (e.g. stroke, dementia, bone fractures). Increasing numbers of individuals living with chronic disabilities or limited function Disabilities secondary to rising numbers of chronic medical conditions in adults  Diabetes, arthritis, obesity, amputations, multiple sclerosis, mental illness Children  Born with developmental disabilities (e.g. cerebral palsy, down’s syndrome, autism), congenital limb deficiencies, feeding disorders; Expanded role of OT in the schools providing services to disabled students Improving technologic and medical advances: Make it possible for people to live longer, yet often times with chronic conditions; these individuals may be in need of extensive therapy in order to regain their independence and quality of life.
  • The most recent earning information for occupational therapists dates back to May 2008. Median annual earnings of occupational therapists were $66,780 in May 2008. The lowest 10% earned $42,820, and the highest 10% earned more than $98,310. Top paying industries for this occupation include: -home health: OT’s involved in seeing people within their homes after discharge from an institutional setting -“employment services”: includes those OT’s in a management or director position within their facility -schools: include OT’s employed to work within school districts, as well as those OT’s who serve as faculty within colleges and universities -nursing care facilities: includes residential living facilities for those with long term disabilities, elderly persons, those living with mental illness and those recovering from substance abuse dependency. -physician&apos;s offices: include those OT’s working in outpatient therapy clinics (may include those affiliated with a hospital and those that are privately owned) and OT’s who actually work along side a team of doctors on a day-to-day basis (for example, OT’s working within an optometrist, orthopedic, or chiropractors offices).
  • Hospitals will continue to employ a large number of occupational therapists to provide therapy services to patients in the hospital for physical or mental impairments. Hospitals also will need occupational therapists to staff their outpatient rehabilitation programs. Offices of ‘OTHER’ healthcare practitioners include: chiropractors, optometrists, mental health practitioners (aside from physicians), private practices (interdisciplinary and/or strictly OT services). Employment growth in schools will result from the expansion of the school-age population, the extension of services for disabled students, and an increasing prevalence of sensory disorders in children. Therapists will be needed to help children with disabilities prepare to enter special education programs. Newly emerging areas of practice for occupational therapists related to the needs of an aging population are increasing demand for services. These include low vision rehabilitation; treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and other forms of dementia, including caregiver training; older driver safety and rehabilitation; assisted living; and home safety and home modification to enable “aging in place.”
  • Reasons for growth &amp; the need for more Occupational Therapy Assistants Increased demand for Occupational Therapy services secondary to the reasons previously discussed: our aging population, increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, and people’s focus on maintaining a certain quality of life despite onset of illness or impairments Government trends toward cost-containment measures in health care: -Occupational therapists are expected to increasingly use assistants and aides to reduce the cost of occupational therapy services. -Once the occupational therapist evaluates and designs a clients treatment plan, the occupational therapy assistant can provide many aspects of treatment, as prescribed by the therapist. Productivity demands by employers &amp; insurance companies continues to increase for OT’s -Therefore facilitating a greater reliance on the collaborative approach between OT’s and OTA’s to deliver quality, client-centered therapy OTA has a vital role in supporting therapy with the steadily growing elderly population -These clients often require additional assistance during their treatment sessions
  • Many of the same areas that have the highest earning potential for Occupational Therapists also have the highest earning potential for Occupational Therapy Assistants. -Home health: OTA’s involved in helping the OT treat people within their homes after discharge from an institutional setting -“Employment services”: includes those OTA’s involved in management or a director position within their facility -Offices of ‘OTHER’ healthcare practitioners include: chiropractors, optometrists, mental health practitioners (aside from physicians), private practices (interdisciplinary and/or strictly OT services). -Nursing care facilities and community care facilities fall under the same umbrella, providing care to the following: those within a residential living facility secondary to a long term disability; the elderly who cannot or may be unsafe to live independently; those living with a mental illness; and those recovering from substance abuse dependency.
  • Offices of ‘OTHER’ healthcare practitioners include, Chiropractors, Optometrists, Mental Health Practitioners (aside from Physicians), Private Practices (Interdisciplinary and/or OT) As previously stated, the use of OTA’s is expected to increase within these specific settings due to the reasons previously stated: Increased demand for occupational therapy services within the population as a whole Government trends toward cost-containment: use of assistants and aides to reduce the cost of occupational therapy services. Increased productivity demands for OT’s lead to greater reliance on OTA’s to deliver quality, client-centered therapy School-based OT’s caseloads continue to increase as more children are identified as having special needs Steadily growing elderly population often require additional assistance during their treatment sessions
  • Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants serve a diverse population. Therefore, the occupational therapy profession is actively seeking to increase the number of practitioners representing culturally diverse backgrounds. These include blacks, Asian Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic and Pacific Islanders as well as people with disabilities and men.
  • Occupational Therapy practitioners empower their clients to engage and fully participate in meaningful activities of daily life. They use occupations or activities that comprise the client’s life experience, to improve the health and wellbeing of their clients (Larson, Wood, &amp; Clark, 2003) They actively collaborate with clients by considering a client&apos;s abilities, the features of the environment, and the specific demands of the activities that are important to the client. Practitioners work with clients of all ages and a wide range of diagnoses and medical needs. Now we will hear the perspectives of some clients who have benefitted from occupational therapy. References Larson, E., Wood, W., &amp; Clark, F. (2003). Occupational science: Building the science and practice of occupation through an academic discipline. In E.B. Crepeau, E.S. Cohn, &amp; B.A. B. Schell (Eds.), Willard &amp; Spackman’s occupational therapy (10 th ed., pp. 15-26). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams &amp; Wilkins.
  • A young girl’s mother described the benefits of OT.
  • A teenager’s mother described the benefits of OT. The teenager also described why he liked OT.
  • A young man describes his experiences with occupational therapy.
  • A man describes his own experiences with occupational therapy.
  • It may be helpful to look at what occupational therapy practitioners actually do during their work days. Daily tasks can vary greatly depending on the work setting of the practitioner. We will focus on four practitioners in four different areas of practice: pediatrics, physical disabilities, mental health, and education and research.
  • Penny Donehoo works in a school with children to improve academic and self-care skills. Here are some examples of tasks she does with children during the day: sensory recommendations, adapt clothing and backpacks, obstacle courses with different types of tactile experiences, grasp and handwriting, and adapt locker and classroom setup. The picture shows Penny removing a movement cushion from this child’s chair because he no longer needs it to concentrate on his school work. She remarks that, “there are constant opportunities to problem solve and stretch your brain” and the best part of her day is “when a treatment session goes well and a child achieves greater independence.”
  • Alejandro Cuevas works in a hospital for veterans, working with those with physical disabilities become more independent. These are examples of what Alejandro does during the day: self care skills such as dressing or bathing, exercises to improve strength and movement, suggests adaptive equipment, and evaluates safety in the home. He sees meaningful changes in people’s lives and remarks, “I make it my job every day to make a difference in someone’s life through compassion, respect, listening, providing humor as a distraction for pain, motivation and a caring heart.”
  • Mary Michaelsen works in a behavioral health hospital, facilitating daily functioning, coping skills, and cognition with her clients. Mary often provides treatment in groups and may focus on these areas: relapse prevention, positive communication, relaxation techniques, anger management, and stress management. She has worked there for 30 years and realizes that, “The best part of being a practitioner is when a patient tells me I have helped them see how special they are, that they are respected and despite their mental illness, they can live a life that is fulfilling.”
  • Brent Braveman works for a university as a professor and as a researcher. He appreciates the variety in his work, recognizing opportunities to: develop and deliver lectures, write journal articles or book chapters, meet with colleagues to collaborate on student issues, research, and provide interventions for research subjects. Brent enjoys the constant opportunities for growth and learning and remarks that, “Knowing that you have helped to expand the worldview of a client or student and that they see things just a little differently because of you is a great part of being an educator/researcher.”
  • In 2017, both AOTA and the profession of occupational therapy will turn 100 years old. This is a time to celebrate where we have come from, and consider how to advance occupational therapy into the 21st century. You can be a part of this exciting time by choosing a career in occupational therapy! Please visit the AOTA Web site for more information about becoming an occupational therapy practitioner at http://www.aota.org
  • A Career in Occupational Therapy

    1. 2. What is occupational therapy?
    2. 3. Occupational therapy is a health care profession that focuses on helping people of all ages regain, develop, or master everyday skills in order to live independent, productive, and satisfying lives.
    3. 4. What qualities or traits are useful in practicing occupational therapy?
    4. 5. Personal Qualities or Traits <ul><li>Enjoy helping people </li></ul><ul><li>Strong communication skills </li></ul><ul><li>Strong interpersonal skills </li></ul><ul><li>Good problem solver </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy working with others </li></ul><ul><li>Creative </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible </li></ul>
    5. 6. What are the educational requirements for a career in occupational therapy?
    6. 7. Educational Requirements: Occupational Therapist <ul><li>Postbaccalaureate Degree </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Entry-level Master’s Degree (MA, MS, or MOT) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Entry-level Doctoral Degree (OTD) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.aota.org/Students/Prospective/FAQs/38216.aspx </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Supervised Fieldwork </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Coursework: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction to Occupational Therapy Practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Theories of Occupational Therapy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Functional Movement and Mobility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cognition and Perception </li></ul></ul>
    7. 8. Educational Requirements: Occupational Therapy Assistant <ul><li>Associate’s Degree </li></ul><ul><li>Supervised Fieldwork </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Coursework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Terminology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anatomy & Physiology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Psychology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rehabilitation Therapy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gerontology </li></ul></ul>
    8. 9. Prerequisite Requirements <ul><li>Biology </li></ul><ul><li>Human Anatomy & Physiology </li></ul><ul><li>Abnormal Psychology </li></ul><ul><li>Sociology or Anthropology </li></ul><ul><li>Childhood Development </li></ul><ul><li>Statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Terminology </li></ul><ul><li>Related Volunteer Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Related Work Experience </li></ul>
    9. 10. How do I learn which colleges and universities offer occupational therapy education programs?
    10. 11. Accredited Educational Programs <ul><li>In order to become an occupational therapy practitioner, you must graduate from an accredited program. </li></ul><ul><li>Visit the ATOA Web site at http://www.aota.org/Students/Schools.aspx for a list of accredited schools. </li></ul><ul><li>Centralized application system beginning in 2011 for OT programs </li></ul>
    11. 12. Further Information <ul><li>Visit the Prospective Students section of the AOTA Web site at http://www.aota.org/Students/Prospective.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Find answers to frequently asked questions at http://www.aota.org/Students/Prospective/FAQs.aspx </li></ul>
    12. 13. Where do occupational therapy practitioners work?
    13. 14. As an OT practitioner, I could work in physical disabilities… <ul><li>Hospitals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Acute care </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inpatient rehab </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialty units (e.g. spinal cord injury) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nursing homes </li></ul><ul><li>Home health </li></ul><ul><li>Work rehabilitation </li></ul>
    14. 15. As an OT practitioner, I could work in mental health… <ul><li>Psychiatric facilities </li></ul><ul><li>Psychiatric units in hospitals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adults or adolescents </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Community mental health programs </li></ul><ul><li>Specialty units in nursing homes (e.g. dementia units) </li></ul>
    15. 16. As an OT practitioner, I could work in pediatrics… <ul><li>Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Pediatric units in hospitals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Oncology, burn units, neonatal intensive care, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hospital-based outpatient clinics </li></ul><ul><li>Private clinics </li></ul><ul><li>Private practice </li></ul>
    16. 17. As an OT practitioner, I could work in academics & research… <ul><li>Academics & research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach in an occupational therapy or occupational therapy assistant program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be a clinician and a teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach and do research </li></ul></ul>
    17. 18. As an OT practitioner, I could work in specialty areas such as… <ul><li>Hand therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Driver rehabilitation </li></ul><ul><li>Low vision rehabilitation </li></ul><ul><li>Wheelchair seating </li></ul><ul><li>Assistive technology </li></ul><ul><li>Design & accessibility consultation </li></ul>
    18. 19. What is the job outlook for occupational therapy?
    19. 20. Job Outlook: Occupational Therapists <ul><li>Employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase 23% between 2006 and 2016, therefore growth is expected to be much faster than the average for all occupations. </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons for growth & the need for more occupational therapists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Baby-boom generation’s movement into middle age </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aging of the population age 75 and older </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing numbers of individuals living with chronic disabilities or limited function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving technologic and medical advances </li></ul></ul>Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos078.htm
    20. 21. Earnings: Occupational Therapists <ul><li>Median annual earnings of occupational therapists were $66,780 in May 2008. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The lowest 10% earned $42,820, and the highest 10% earned more than $98,310. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Top paying industries for this occupation: </li></ul>Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos078.htm Industry Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage Home health $38.03 $79,110 Employment services (managers, directors) $37.80 $78,630 Other schools and instruction $36.18 $75,260 Nursing care facilities $35.19 $73,200 Physician’s office $34.54 $71,840
    21. 22. Workforce Trends: Occupational Therapists-May 2008 Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291122.htm Industry Employment (thousands) General medical and surgical hospitals 23,630 Offices of other health practitioners 20,340 Elementary and secondary schools 12,580 Nursing care facilities 8,630 Home health care services 6,390
    22. 23. Job Outlook: Occupational Therapy Assistants <ul><li>Employment of occupational therapy assistants is expected to grow 25% from 2006 to 2016, much faster than the average for all occupations. </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons for growth & the need for more occupational therapy assistants: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased demand for occupational therapy services (as previously discussed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government trends toward cost-containment measures in health care </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Productivity demands by employers & insurance companies continues to increase for OT’s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OTA has a vital role in supporting therapy with the steadily growing elderly population </li></ul></ul>Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos166.htm#outlook
    23. 24. Earnings: Occupational Therapy Assistants <ul><li>Median annual earnings of occupational therapy assistants were $48,230 in May 2008. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The lowest 10% earned $31,150 and the highest 10% earned more than $65,160. </li></ul></ul>Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos166.htm#outlook Industry Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage Home health $28.28 $58,810 Employment services (managers, directors) $25.27 $52,560 Offices of other healthcare practitioners $24.50 $50,970 Nursing care facilities $24.08 $50,090 Community care facilities for the elderly $23.43 $48,730
    24. 25. Workforce Trends: Occupational Therapy Assistants-May 2008 Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes312011.htm Industry Employment (thousands) Offices of Other Health Practitioners 7.560 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 5,410 Nursing Care Facilities 4,660 Elementary and Secondary Schools 1,800 Home Health Services 1,000
    25. 26. Does occupational therapy offer opportunities for individuals of culturally diverse backgrounds?
    26. 27. Cultural Diversity in the Occupational Therapy Profession <ul><li>The occupational therapy profession is actively seeking to increase the number of practitioners representing culturally diverse backgrounds. Target populations include blacks, Asian Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Pacific Islanders. Other underrepresented groups include people with disabilities and men. </li></ul>www.aota.org
    27. 28. Whom is helped by occupational therapy?
    28. 29. Parent’s Perspective “ I have learned a lot from being part of the OT sessions and have learned to view everyday objects and activities through an OT lens to incorporate these same tasks and functions into [my daughter’s] daily life without her knowing it’s therapeutic as well!”
    29. 30. Parent’s Perspective “ OT was one of the few therapies that produced an immediate calm. It was something he looked forward to.” &quot;I enjoyed OT because it was like recess, art, and a massage combined together.&quot;
    30. 31. Client’s Perspective “ I began working with an occupational therapy practitioner first as an inpatient and then as an outpatient following a hemorrhagic stroke in October 2008…the occupational therapists focused on my arm/hand movements and my activities of daily living (ADLs) like getting dressed, brushing my teeth, bathing, etc…occupational therapy has played (and continues to play) a critical role in my stroke recovery.”
    31. 32. Client’s Perspective <ul><li>“ The therapist tried to customize the program so that in her professional judgment would help me while still incorporating my personal goals and interests.” </li></ul>
    32. 33. What does an occupational therapy practitioner’s day actually look like? A glance into the everyday tasks of a few practitioners
    33. 34. A day in the life of… Penny Donehoo, MS, OTR/L School-based Pediatrics <ul><li>This OT uses these types of activities for treatment: </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt clothing and backpacks </li></ul><ul><li>Obstacle courses with different types of tactile experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Grasp and handwriting </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt locker and classroom setup </li></ul>The best part of my day is “when a treatment session goes well and a child achieves greater independence.”
    34. 35. A day in the life of… Alejandro Cuevas, Jr., BA, COTA/L Adult Physical Disabilities <ul><li>This OTA uses these types of activities for treatment: </li></ul><ul><li>Self care skills such as dressing or bathing </li></ul><ul><li>Exercises to improve strength and movement </li></ul><ul><li>Suggests adaptive equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluates safety in the home </li></ul>“ I make it my job every day to make a difference in someone’s life through compassion, respect, listening, providing humor as a distraction for pain, motivation, and a caring heart .”
    35. 36. A day in the life of… Mary Michaelsen, OTR/L Mental Health <ul><li>This OT uses these types of groups for treatment: </li></ul><ul><li>Relapse prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Positive communication </li></ul><ul><li>Relaxation techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Anger management </li></ul><ul><li>Stress management </li></ul>“ The best part of being a practitioner is when a patient tells me I have helped them see how special they are, that they are respected and despite their mental illness, they can live a life that is fulfilling.”
    36. 37. A day in the life of… Brent Braveman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Education and Research <ul><li>This OT is involved in these types of tasks: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop and deliver lectures </li></ul><ul><li>Write journal articles or book chapters </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with colleagues to collaborate on student issues </li></ul><ul><li>Research for classes, research, or grants </li></ul><ul><li>Provide interventions for research subjects </li></ul>“ Knowing that you have helped to expand the worldview of a client or student and that they see things just a little differently because of you is a great part of being an educator and researcher.”
    37. 38. What is the future of occupational therapy? 2017: A Century of Occupational Therapy
    38. 39. AOTA’s Centennial Vision <ul><li>&quot;We envision that occupational therapy is a powerful, widely recognized, science-driven, and evidence-based profession with a globally connected and diverse workforce meeting society's occupational needs.&quot; </li></ul>
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