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Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
Muslim Americans
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Muslim Americans

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Final Presentation on Muslim Americans

Final Presentation on Muslim Americans

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  • 1. MUSLIM AMERICANSJune 30, 2012
  • 2. WHAT IS A MUSLIM?“If you are a Muslim, Islam is your identity. You can be a dutiful Muslim, or a sinful one, still your identity is a Muslim. In order to be a Muslim, you have to consider yourself to be a slave, and a servant of Allah; accountable to His command and subject to His will.” – IslamiCity.com
  • 3. CHARACTERISTICS OF MUSLIMAMERICANS Practice the religion of Islam Live in America (immigrants, U.S. born, or converts) Exist to serve Allah (God) Follow six major beliefs in  One God  Angels of God  Books of God (Quran, Torah, Gospels, Psalms, Scrolls)  Prophets or Messengers of God  Day of Judgment  Divine Decree – whatever happens in life is Allah’s will Level of commitment and practice varies (as with all religions and ways of life)
  • 4. CULTURE - BACKGROUND Extremely diverse group from over 80 different countries  Africans, Asians, Europeans, and Arabians  Predominantly African American Common connection -- Islamic religious beliefs  People were created to worship Allah (God) Strong sense of commitment to family and community Continually changing demographics due to high rates of conversion to Islam in existing U.S. population
  • 5. CULTURE – FOUNDED ON RELIGIOUS BELIEFS Acts of Worship Form a Way of Life  Declaration of Faith  Prayer  Charity  Fasting  Pilgrimage Guiding principle for assimilation “…everything in a culture is permissible except that which is explicitly prohibited by Islamic teaching….” (Husain & Ross-Sheriff, 2011, p. 362) Many beliefs are consistent with Christianity and Judaism
  • 6. CULTURE – ISLAMIC VALUES Peacefulness and charity are treasured and practiced Prayer is primary source of guidance Men and women are deemed equal Marriage and family are expected and valued – strong allegiance to extended family and elderly Education is paramount Modesty is emphasized (dress and behavior) Harm to one’s self is prohibited (alcohol, drugs, some meats, gambling, greed) Charity is promoted (2.5% tithing)
  • 7. U.S. HISTORY – EARLY ARRIVALS First Muslim explorers came to U.S. in 1100s Most notable arrivals (approximately 10 million) were part of the African slave trade in 1500s Immigrants in 1900s came from Palestine, Lebanon, and Pakistan – mostly unskilled looking for work Skilled professionals and students arrived in 1950s looking for improved living conditions  Rise of Muslim communities and Islamic groups  Increase in Black Muslim representation
  • 8. PRESENT DAY POPULATION GROWTH Conversion to Islam accounts for significant growth in Muslim American communities Immigration continues through family sponsorship, refugees, and government issued lottery visas
  • 9. POPULATION STATISTICS 1.57 billion Muslims worldwide 2.5 –10 million Muslim Americans (estimated – not tracked) 65% of Muslim Americans are 1st generation immigrants 35% of Muslim American population born in U.S. Two-thirds of Muslim American population came to America after 1990  Arab countries, South Asia, Africa, and Europe Population increasing due to third generation births and conversion to Islam  Fastest growing religion in the United States
  • 10. HISTORY - OPPRESSION Oppression stems from U.S. relations with Muslim countries and perceived connections to terrorism Racism and bigotry also prevail, particularly if Black or dark skinned Culturally derived misconceptions exist about women Post-9/11 struggles with harassment and bullying Assimilation and peer pressure challenge youth where modesty and American culture conflict (music, dress, dating)
  • 11. U.S. POPULATION CONSTRUCT 54% Male and 46% Female Generally young, educated, and financially sound (many are now third generation Americans)  Education and financial stats align with general U.S. population  41% have household income of $50,000 or higher  24% have college degrees  48% are between age 30-49  72% say religion is very important Geographically dispersed throughout U.S. with heavy concentration in cities on coasts
  • 12. U.S. POPULATION CONSTRUCT CONTINUED Political attitudes follow general American population except where foreign policy is concerned Despite practiced American patriotism, Muslims face increasingly intense scrutiny and anti-Islamic behavior Concerns about mental health and substance abuse due to dual identity (Muslim and American)  Not likely to seek treatment; turn to prayer  Privacy concerns
  • 13. ELDERLY Often immigrants, unskilled, and poorer Highly respected Typically reside with extended family Access to health care is a concern since Medicare and Medicaid cover nursing homes or long-term care facilities, limiting coverage of care at home
  • 14. WOMEN Considered equal to men Encouraged to receive an education and pursue careers Inspiration of children’s education and upbringing Practice modesty; although styles vary Exploitation, abuse, and oppression are not the Muslim way, but rather byproducts of other cultural practices.
  • 15. YOUTH Raised to be respectful and obedient  Particularly respectful of elders Encouraged to become educated Girls practice modesty (dress and behavior) and are not permitted to date before marriage Lead double lives with “American” friends and “Muslim” friends Subject to extreme bullying and peer pressure
  • 16. BARRIERS TO EDUCATION Education among men and women is strongly encouraged Greatest challenge for the Muslim American student is bullying  Given the vast diversity within the Muslim American community, additional challenges (racism ) exist due to other cultural influences or circumstances. Bullying often leads to depression and addiction  Allah is primary source of guidance  Not likely to seek help from social workers or health care providers
  • 17. STRATEGIES FOR TEACHERSAND SCHOOLS First, educate yourself…adults are often the root cause of Muslim American bullying Educate students about  Muslim American history, beliefs, and values  Middle East and Asia  History of Islam Draw on prior knowledge  9/11 vs. Timothy McVeigh vs. Hitler Leverage social media and technology Bring in guest speakers to make it real
  • 18. STRATEGIES FOR TEACHERS AND SCHOOL Be Aware of Bullying  Know the signs  Actively address concerns Create a culture of respect and tolerance  Acknowledge religious practices, holidays, and prohibitions  Encourage discussions, questions, role playing and debates on current events  Promote student advocacy
  • 19. LESSON PLAN –APPRECIATING ISLAM (INTRODUCTION) Student Population: Grade 6 Catholic School Students Subject Area: Religion Background: Strong understanding of Christianity. Very little understanding of other religions. Strong connection to events of 9/11 through media and school. A fair number of family members are in the military stationed in Afghanistan. Weak appreciation of diversity.
  • 20. LESSON PLAN – APPRECIATING ISLAM(INTRODUCTION) CONTINUED Objective: Raise student awareness of Islamic beliefs and practices in order to foster an environment of respect and tolerance and appreciation of diversity. Activator: Collectively brainstorm a list of core beliefs and practices in Catholicism. Next brainstorm a list of what students know or believe about Muslims and Islam. Introduction: Video introduction to Islam; Introduce and describe (unveil) the six major beliefs, five major duties, prophets, sacred texts, and “leadership” of Islam. Discuss similarities and differences to Catholicism. Activity: Students create a Venn diagram comparing their Catholic beliefs and practices to those of Islam. Students present diagrams and discuss prior misconceptions. Wrap Up: Summary video of Islam
  • 21. LESSON PLAN – APPRECIATING ISLAM(INTRODUCTION) CONTINUED Extensions:  Continue to explore Muslim and Catholic comparisons in a social context including dress, music, foods, holidays, and prayer. Students write about or role-play a common social situation they experience and how it would differ if they were Muslim.  Discuss the impact of 9/11 on Muslim Americans. Introduce students to anti-Islamic scenarios and discuss bystander vs. upstander responses. Students role-play different responses.
  • 22. INTERNET RESOURCES IslamiCity Islamic American University Islamic Society of North America Muslim American Civic and Cultural Association Muslim American Society Muslims for America Quran Institute The American Muslim The Straight Path Initiative
  • 23. COMMUNITY RESOURCES Mosques – A place of prayer, socialization, celebration, and learning at the community level Islamic Schools – Community-based alternative to public schools instilling Islamic values and practicing Muslim ways of life Muslim American Society – Local chapters provide education about Islam, community service, and activism Islamic American University – Designed to teach Islamic sciences and Arabic language to undergraduate and graduate students
  • 24. COMMUNITY RESOURCES Scouting – working with the Girl and Boy Scouts of America to teach the fundamentals of scouting and provide a source of recreation and community service Quran Institute – Help Muslims to fully understand the teachings of the Quran; primarily done in a homeschool format online via Skype The Straight Path Initiative – Aimed at 15-30 year olds, focused on helping youth and young adults to combat extremism and radicalism while developing bicultural competence
  • 25. SOURCES A brief history of Islam in the United States. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.colostate.edu/orgs/MSA/find_more/iia.html Ahmad, I. (2011, November 20). Defining the American Muslim identity. Retrieved from http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=IC1111-4931 Al-Disi, H. & Addams, J. (2003, November). The Zakat: An act of charity, a tax and a tithe. Retrieved from http://www.islamawareness.net/Zakat/tithe.html Al-Heeti, R. (2007, May 11). Why nursing homes will not work: Caring for the needs of the aging Muslim American population. The Elder Law Journal, 15, 206. Retrieved from http://www.lawonclark.com/pdfs/Al-Heeti.pdf Auda, J. (2011, January 4). The role of the mosque. Retrieved from http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding- islam/worship/prayers/450408-the-role-of-the-mosque.html Bryner, J. (2008, October 30). The truth about Muslims in America. Retrieved from http://www.livescience.com/5157-truth-muslims- america.html
  • 26. SOURCES Clock, G. (Ed.). (2008, December 18). Muslims in America – A statistical portrait. In Being Muslim in America. Retrieved from http://www.america.gov/st/peopleplace- english/2008/December/20081222090246jmnamdeirf0.4547083.html Hakim, S. (n.d.). Muslims teachers guide: Beliefs and daily lives of Muslims. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/teach/muslims/beliefs.html Holcomb, S. (n.d.). Muslims in America: When bullying meets religion. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/home/42528.htm Husain, A. & Ross-Sheriff, F. (2011). Cultural competence with Muslim Americans. In D. Lum (Ed.), Culturally competent practice: A framework for understanding diverse groups and justice issues (pp. 358-389). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. Numan, F. (1992, December). American Muslim history: A chronological observation. Retrieved from http://www.islam101.com/history/muslim_us_hist.html

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