Theoretical PerspectivesHow Sociologists Attempt to Make Sense of the World We Live In
Objectives• Students will identify the three major  theoretical perspectives in sociology today.
Vocabulary•   theoretical perspective: a set of assumptions accepted as true.•   functionalism: approach that emphasizes t...
Role of Theoretical Perspectives• Perception is the way the brain interprets an image or  event  • Also how you interpret ...
Video athttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8zBC2dvERM
Theoretical Perspective• Set of assumptions about an area of study • About the workings of society• Sometimes theories are...
Functionalism•   Emphasizes the contributions (functions) of each part of a    society•   Family, economy, religion, etc.•...
Stability•   Functionalism assumes societies return to a state of stability after    some upheaval has occurred•   1960s: ...
Functional Aspects• Most aspects of society exist to promote a society’s  survival and welfare.• Two kinds of positive fun...
Conflict Perspective• Emphasizes conflict, competition, change and  constraint within society• Reverse of functionalism • Fu...
Power• Social living is a contest; those who have power have  the most wealth, power and privileges  • Have the most motiv...
Symbolic Interactionism• Charles Cooley and George Mead, late 19th century  sociologists developed the insight that member...
Symbolic Interactionism• Formal definitions of symbols that convey meanings  about the group • Interactions based on mutual...
Three Assumptions• Three assumptions central to this perspective: • We learn the meaning of a symbol from the way we    se...
Dramaturgy• To better understand human interaction,  sociologists developed dramaturgy• Depict human interaction a theatri...
03 - Theoretical Perspective
03 - Theoretical Perspective
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03 - Theoretical Perspective

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Lecture Notes for Mr. English's Sociology Class.

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  • 03 - Theoretical Perspective

    1. 1. Theoretical PerspectivesHow Sociologists Attempt to Make Sense of the World We Live In
    2. 2. Objectives• Students will identify the three major theoretical perspectives in sociology today.
    3. 3. Vocabulary• theoretical perspective: a set of assumptions accepted as true.• functionalism: approach that emphasizes the contributions made by each part of society.• manifest functions: intended and recognized consequences of an aspect of society.• latent functions: unintended and unrecognized consequences of an aspect of society.• dysfunction: negative consequences of an aspect of society.• conflict perspective: approach emphasizing the role of conflict, competition, and constraint within a society.• power: the ability to control the behavior of others.• symbol: anything that stands for something else and has an agreed upon meaning attached to it.• symbolic interactionism: approach that focuses on the interactions among people based on mutually understood symbols.• dramaturgy: approach that depicts human interaction as theatrical performances.
    4. 4. Role of Theoretical Perspectives• Perception is the way the brain interprets an image or event • Also how you interpret the meaning of an image or event• Which image you see depends on your focus • Your perspective influences what you see • One perspective of an event vs. another
    5. 5. Video athttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8zBC2dvERM
    6. 6. Theoretical Perspective• Set of assumptions about an area of study • About the workings of society• Sometimes theories are competing or conflicting with each other• Sociology has three overarching perspectives: functionalism, conflict theory and symbolic interactionism
    7. 7. Functionalism• Emphasizes the contributions (functions) of each part of a society• Family, economy, religion, etc.• See parts of a society as an integrated whole • Change in one part leads to changes in others • e.g. Major change in the economy may change the family (Industrial Revolution)• Consensus on values - most Americans believe in desirablity of some values
    8. 8. Stability• Functionalism assumes societies return to a state of stability after some upheaval has occurred• 1960s: Student unrest and protest • American public no longer accepts involvement in all wars as legitimate • Universities are now more responsive to students’ needs and goals • Public is more aware of the importance of environmental protection• Revolutionized America?
    9. 9. Functional Aspects• Most aspects of society exist to promote a society’s survival and welfare.• Two kinds of positive function: manifest and latent• Manifest functions are intended and recognized (schools: manifest function ➙ teach math skills)• Latent functions are unintended and unrecognized (schools: latent functions ➙ develop close friendships)• Negative consequences: dysfunction (bureaucracies)
    10. 10. Conflict Perspective• Emphasizes conflict, competition, change and constraint within society• Reverse of functionalism • Functionalism emphasizes ways people cooperate to reach common goals• Conflict perspective focuses on disagreements in society or between societies
    11. 11. Power• Social living is a contest; those who have power have the most wealth, power and privileges • Have the most motivation to constrain, or limit the less powerful• As balance of power among groups shift, change occurs • e.g. women’s movement
    12. 12. Symbolic Interactionism• Charles Cooley and George Mead, late 19th century sociologists developed the insight that members of groups influence each other’s behavior• Symbolic Interactionism focuses on actual interaction among people• Focuses on symbols, that represent something else• American flag, school mascot, etc
    13. 13. Symbolic Interactionism• Formal definitions of symbols that convey meanings about the group • Interactions based on mutually understood symbols
    14. 14. Three Assumptions• Three assumptions central to this perspective: • We learn the meaning of a symbol from the way we see others reacting to it (Latin American whistling) • Once we learn the meaning of symbols, we base our interaction on them. (Avoid encore) • We use the meanings of symbols to imagine how others will respond to our behavior (internal conversations)
    15. 15. Dramaturgy• To better understand human interaction, sociologists developed dramaturgy• Depict human interaction a theatrical performance• Presentation of self; or impression managment
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