APACHE
SSI(Server Side Includes):
         SSI (Server Side Includes) are directives that are placed in HTML pages, and ev...
Apache
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Apache

280

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
280
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Apache

  1. 1. APACHE SSI(Server Side Includes):          SSI (Server Side Includes) are directives that are placed in HTML pages, and evaluated on the  server while the pages are being served. They let you add dynamically generated content to an  existing HTML page, without having to serve the entire page via a CGI program, or other dynamic  technology.       The decision of when to use SSI, and when to have your page entirely generated by some  program, is usually a matter of how much of the page is static, and how much needs to be  recalculated every time the page is served. SSI is a great way to add small pieces of information,  such as the current time. But if a majority of your page is being generated at the time that it is  served, you need to look for some other solution. Document root:      The directory (in the real filesystem) from which your Web server will be serving most of its  Web pages. For example:                     If you set the document root to /home/httpd/html, then accesses to  http://your.webserver.com/index.html would return the file /home/httpd/html/index.html. An access  to http://your.webserver.com/foo/gazonk.gif would return /home/httpd/html/foo/gazonk.gif. Error log :                 The path to the log file for error messages. Usually, it is logs/error_log, which is relative  to the ServerRoot. Often the directory logs in ServerRoot is a symbolic link to /var/log/httpd. Then  the log path above would result in error messages being logged to /var/log/httpd/error_log. Listen on port:                       The TCP port on which the Web server should listen for HTTP requests. The standard  port for HTTP is 80, so if you use another port you need to include it in the URL. For example, if  you let your Web server listen on port 8000, then the URL to your server would be  http://your.webserver.com:8000/. Server Root:               The ServerRoot directive sets the directory in which the server lives. Typically it will  contain the subdirectories conf/ and logs/. Relative paths in other configuration directives (such as  Include or LoadModule, for example) are taken as relative to this directory. Example:               ServerRoot /home/httpd  Virtuat Host:                <VirtualHost> and </VirtualHost> are used to enclose a group of directives that will  apply only to a particular virtual host. Any directive that is allowed in a virtual host context may be  used. When the server receives a request for a document on a particular virtual host, it uses the  configuration directives enclosed in the <VirtualHost>  section.

×