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Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use
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Self-service design - Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use

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We describe results from an experiment exploring how to effectively place instructions in online forms for expert and low literacy users.

We describe results from an experiment exploring how to effectively place instructions in online forms for expert and low literacy users.

Published in: Design
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  • 1. (Self-)service design! Eye-tracking Findings That Will Help You Design Forms That Everyone Can Use! ! ! Caitlin Rinn, University of Baltimore! Noël Alton, University of Baltimore! Kathryn Summers, University of Baltimore! Kath Straub, Usability.org! !
  • 2. Why forms?
  • 3. < What are the *%#@ password requirements??
  • 4. 7
  • 5. There are MANY of tiny decisions •  Where  do  the  instruc.ons  go?   •  Should  they  be  visible  or  behind  a  link?   •  How  many  sec.ons  or  pages?   •  Where  do  the  labels  go?   •  How  do  we  show  which  fields  are  required?   •  How  do  we  show  what’s  required  in  a  field?   •  How  do  we  communicate  that  the  user  didn’t     do  what  we  wanted?   •  How  do  we  word  rights  and  responsibili.es?    
  • 6. In a world of self-service design, If you can’t fill the form, you cant [X] o  Order on-line o  Change your mailing address o  Get a parking spot at Uni o  Access internet @ the conference o  Register to vote o  Get needed government benefits
  • 7. Bargas-Avila, Orsini, Urwyler & Opwis (2011) Use  this    
  • 8. Use  this     Seckler, Heinz, Bargas-avila, Opwis & Tuch (2014)
  • 9. Bojko, Aga and Schumacher, R. (2008). Use  these  
  • 10. *   Use  this     [Required] * Not published, but based on Toronto Public Library UT & accessibility field research
  • 11. Our studies … •  Where  do  the  instruc.ons  go?   •  Should  they  be  visible  or  behind  a  link?   •  How  many  sec.ons  or  pages?   •  Where  do  the  labels  go?   •  How  do  we  show  which  fields  are  required?   •  How  do  we  show  what’s  required  in  a  field?   •  How  do  we  communicate  that  the  user  didn’t     do  what  we  wanted?   •  How  do  we  word  rights  and  responsibili.es?    
  • 12. Participants 18 Expert Users (American University Students and Community members) •  Ages 18 – 47; 72% male 25 At-Risk Users •  Ages 28 – 77; 52% male •  9 Older users (over 60) What did they do? •  REALM •  Participants each completed several forms •  Parking permit" •  User name and password" •  Medical/Optical clinic intake form" Study design:! "
  • 13. Participants REALM health literacy reading test
  • 14. Participants At risk reading Demographics At risk reading levels 8% at or below 3rd grade level 16% 4th-6th grade level 48% 7th – 8th grade 28% High school +
  • 15. Method Participants completed a series of forms to •  Voter registration •  Get a parking permit •  Sign in at a medical clinic •  Participate in future studies (paper)
  • 16. Method Study design:! " 3 x 3 x 3 design / Latin square presentation" " Variables" •  Instruction placement" •  Instruction visibility" •  Form Layout" Measured" •  Errors" •  Looking patterns/Instruction engagement" " " "
  • 17. Method Instruction location " " " " " Top of Section Above Field Right of Field
  • 18. Method Instruction visibility" " " " " " Visible Hidden -Button Hidden -Link
  • 19. Method Wizard/Gated Accordion Long page Page layout" " " " " "
  • 20. Findings Low literacy participants Took twice as long do complete the task and they often didn’t finish. (30 mins vs. 60 mins)
  • 21. Findings ^^ Instructions above the field 
 got most notice Instruc.on   Loca.on   Instruction Engagement User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Above 62.78 116.47* 89.5 @ Right 45.65 57.65 43.56 Section head 72.33 60.12 70.43
  • 22. Findings Older users & experts engaged when needed Low literacy users tended not to engage < No engagement with 
 the instruction links
  • 23. Findings Instruction Engagement (Clicks) User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Button 2.18 .65 2.56 Text Link 3.18 1.13* 3.00 Visible Text 5.29 4.88 5.50 Input Errors User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Button 2.67 3.24 1.78 Text Link 1.88 4.75* 2.88 Visible Text 1.94 4.13 1.88 ^^ ^^ They looked more but comprehension was shaky < People clicked links more often 
 than buttons Instruc.on   Visibility  
  • 24. Findings ^^ ^^ At-risk users didn’t predict how the accordion would look. Form   Layout   Accordion Percent Completion User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Step One 100% 100% 100% Step Two 100% 75% 75% Step Three 100% 56% 63% Step Four 100% 38% 50% Wizard Percent Completion User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Step One 100% 100% 100% Step Two 100% 75% 88% Step Three 100% 81% 100% Step Four 100% 94% 100% Scrolling Percent Completion User Type Expert Low Lit Over 60 Step One 100% 100% 100% Step Two 100% 81% 88% Step Three 100% 81% 88% Step Four 100% 94% 100%
  • 25. Findings Low literacy findings
 
 Low literacy participants were often surprised by new sections of the page opening up.
  • 26. Findings Low literacy findings
 
 Participants had ideas and expectations about how the interaction might work, but tended not to try them spontaneously. Usernames and passwords were foreign to them. Most didn’t have an email. Low engagement with help information •  Didn’t look at buttons / links •  If they did, they tended not to engage
  • 27. Findings < Participants did not read the page heading
  • 28. Findings Experts expect the form to fix it for them
  • 29. Recommendations Instruction location " " Top of Section Above Field Right of Field Use   this    
  • 30. Recommendations Instruction visibility" " " Visible Hidden -Button Hidden -Link 2nd  choice  Use  this    
  • 31. Recommendations Page layout" " " Wizard/Gated Accordion Long page Don’t  use  this  (!!)  
  • 32. Work in progress •  What sorts of validation feedback engage users and reduce errors? Validation How does environment influence success? Field research Is mobile different? Many of the low literacy participants use a smart phone. Mobile
  • 33. Thanks! Questions? For questions later, contact kath@usability.org

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