HFI Usability Maturity Survey Findings - 2009
 

HFI Usability Maturity Survey Findings - 2009

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Responses from over 1000 participants world wide reporting on the Maturity of Usability in their environments.

Responses from over 1000 participants world wide reporting on the Maturity of Usability in their environments.

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HFI Usability Maturity Survey Findings - 2009 HFI Usability Maturity Survey Findings - 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • the
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey

 2009
Findings
 Kath
Straub

 Mona
Patel
 Arno
Bublitz
 Javier
Broch
 Human
Factors
Interna<onal,
Inc.
 Permanent
loca<on:
www.humanfactors.com/UXMSurvey‐2009

  • Introduc<on
 User
experience
is
the
new
differenAator
in
customer
service.
 To
beYer
understand
the
state
of
the
industry,
Human
Factors
 Just
as
service
is
key
to
customer
saAsfacAon
in
face‐to‐face
 InternaAonal
has
conducted
the
first
survey
of
UX
maturity
 environments,
customer
saAsfacAon
in
the
internet
age
turns
 within
organizaAons.
Our
primary
goal
was
to
develop
a
 on
user‐centered
design,
whether
your
work
faces
the
 snapshot
of
the
user
experience
operaAons
within
usability
 customer
or
the
organizaAon’s
staff.
Providing
websites
that
 aware
organizaAons
world‐wide.
Second,
we
developed
The
 customers
can
easily
learn
and
confidently
use
leads
to
 User
Experience
Maturity
Checklist.
Taken
together,
the
findings
 improved
customer
saAsfacAon
and
increased
loyalty.
Sites,
 and
checklist
help
usability/user
experience
professionals
 applicaAons,
and
tools
that
are
task‐relevant
and
usable
allow
 understand
where
their
organizaAon
is
on
the
path
to
maturity,
 staff
to
complete
tasks
more
efficiently
and
cost
effecAvely.
 and
what
to
do
next.
 

 

 But
how
rouAne
is
usability,
really?
Do
organizaAons
have
 While
Schaffer’s
Usability
Maturity
model,
below,
idenAfies
the
 established
user
experience
groups?
Or
do
user
experience
 hallmarks
of
a
fully
mature
user
experience
program,
there
is
no
 professionals
sAll
float
through,
doing
just‐in‐(me
work
and
 single
template
for
any
organizaAon
to
achieve
usability
 grass
roots
evangelizing?
What
do
teams
look
like?
How
 maturity.
As
we
note
in
our
concluding
remarks,
interpreAng
the
 established
are
the
established
groups?
Do
they
use
a
 survey
results
as
part
of
a
larger
user
experience
strategy
is
a
 common
method?
Published
standards?
Tools
that
support
 separate
step
requiring
a
full
assessment
of
your
organizaAon’s
 robust
research
best
pracAce
design?
Training?
Do
 size,
culture,
market,
and
management
challenges.
 pracAAoners
aggregate
and
share
their
findings
or
does
each
 project
team
reinvent
the
wheel
each
Ame?
And
who
really
 does
the
work?
 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • ©
2004:
Human
Factors
InternaAonal
 www.humanfactors.com

  • What
makes
a
usability
group
mature?

 In
his
2004
book,
InsAtuAonalizaAon
of
Usability:
A
Step‐by‐ Execu<ve
Champions

 Step
Guide,
Eric
Schaffer
describes
a
roadmap
to
 An
execuAve
who
has
made
a
clear
and
visible
commitment
to
 insAtuAonalizaAon
within
organizaAons.
Based
on
25
years
of
 promoAng
usability
throughout
the
organizaAon.
The
execuAve
 observaAon,
he
describes
the
elements
and
characterisAcs
of
 champion’s
role
is
to
educate
his
or
her
peers,
secure
funding,
 maturing
and
mature
usability
pracAces.
He
defines
the
stages
 and
remove
organizaAonal
obstacles.
To
be
effecAve,
the
 of
maturaAon,
and
describes
the
landmines
that
typically
 execuAve
champion
must
be
at
the
SVP
or
C‐
level
of
the
 thwart
progress
and
the
contexts
in
which
they
occur.
 organizaAon,
or
equivalent,
in
order
to
reach
across
the
“silos”
 

 of
parAcular
groups
and
departments.
 HFI’s
Usability
Maturity
Model
 

 

 User
Interface
Standards
 Schaffer
indicates
that
usability
operaAons
are
mature
when
 
Design
standards
go
beyond
brand
and
idenAty
to
define
the
 they
integrate
all
of
the
following
components:
 underlying
look,
feel,
and
flow
of
websites
and
applicaAons
 within
an
organizaAon.
To
be
meaningful,
User
Experience
 • An
ExecuAve
Champion
 
 Standards
must
be
easy
to
find
and
easy
to
use.
(Straub,
2004)
 • User
Interface
Standards
 
 • Professional
Staff
 
 Professional
Staff

 • Tools
 
 To
be
effecAve,
usability
teams
need
staff
to
support
both
 • Training
 
 tacAcal
and
strategic
iniAaAves.
Most
esAmates
suggest
that
an
 • Showcase
Projects
 
 opAmal
usability
staff
would
be
1/10th
the
size
of
the
 

 development
team(s).
Further,
team
members
should
represent
 

 the
range
of
mulA‐disciplinary
skills
that
define
user
experience
 design
in
that
business
sector,
including
psychologists
and
 researchers,
as
well
as
human
factors
engineering,
interacAon
 design,
visual
design
and
analyAcs/measurement
specialists.
 Team
members
should
have
formal
usability
training
that
is
 substanAated
by
degrees
or
cerAficaAons.
 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • What
makes
a
usability
group
mature?

 Tools
All
individuals
who
are
tasked
with
interface
design
 Showcase
Projects
Mature
user
experience
programs
 should
have
open
access
to
a
common
set
of
resources
to
 understand
that
usability
awareness
begins
with
exposure.
 educate
and
support
best
pracAces
in
research
processes
and
 Showcase
projects
are
high‐visibility
projects
that
receive
 interface
design.
The
toolset
should
include
reusable
arAfacts
 support
and
recogniAon
throughout
the
project
Ameline
across
 that
pracAAoners
can
employ
to
streamline
their
work.
The
 the
organizaAon.
Mature
programs
create
and
distribute
case
 tools
should
be
customized
to
reflect
the
user
interface
and
 studies
to
recognize,
validate,
and
disseminate
the
successes
of
 branding
standards.
As
with
standards,
to
be
useful,
tools
 the
usability
group.

 must
be
easy
to
find
and
easy
to
use.
 

 

 Training
Different
individuals
at
different
levels
within
 organizaAons
need
to
understand
different
informaAon
about
 usability.
PracAAoners
need
ongoing,
advanced
training
on
 emerging
methods,
evolving
best
pracAces,
and
current
 trends
across
industries.
Developers
need
to
understand
how
 to
apply
best
pracAces
and
where/how
to
look
for
addiAonal
 guidance
or
tools.
ExecuAves
must
be
able
to
calculate
return
 on
investment
(ROI)—whether
in
improved
revenues,
 enhanced
customer
saAsfacAon,
or
any
other
criteria
specific
 to
that
organizaAon—
without
necessarily
knowing
the
 mechanics
of
usability
or
the
current
best
pracAces
in
user
 experience
design.
Mature
organizaAons
offer
ongoing,
 regular,
level‐appropriate
training
opportuniAes
to
individuals
 across
the
organizaAon.
 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • What
makes
a
usability
group
mature?

 The
maturity
components
that
Schaffer
defined
in
2004
sAll
 Enterprise
Knowledge
Management
The
usability
knowledge
 hold
today.
However,
since
the
publicaAon
of
his
book,
 management
system
should
be
the
single,
central
repository
for
 Schaffer
has
added
two
addiAonal
components
to
the
 all
resources
and
arAfacts
related
to
usability
and
the
pracAce
of
 definiAon
of
maturity:
 usability
within
an
organizaAon.
Usability
groups
aggregate
and
 share
their
charter,
strategy,
standards,
reusable
research,
and
 • Enterprise
Knowledge
Management
 
 design
arAfacts
(e.g.,
personas,
graphics
library)
in
a
common
 • Digital
UX
Strategy
 
 locaAon.
Mature
usability
groups
also
share
and
cross‐reference
 reports
and
observaAons,
streamlining
the
research
process,
and
 creaAng
cost
efficiencies.
When
key
learnings
can
be
efficiently
 accessed
and
applied,
organizaAons
do
not
have
to
“start
from
 scratch”
with
every
subsequent
project.
 

 Digital
UX
Strategy
Mature
usability
organizaAons
have
a
clear,
 acAonable
Digital
UX
Strategy
that
idenAfies
touch
points
and
 synergies
of
usability
across
the
inward
and
outward‐facing
 customer
communicaAon
systems.
The
Digital
UX
Strategy
 prioriAzes
user
experience
as
an
organizaAonal
success
driver
by
 creaAng
accountability
for
measurable
success
criteria
which
are
 reported
to
an
execuAve
governance
commiYee
at
regular
 intervals.
 

 Building
these
elements
and
resources
takes
leadership,
Ame,
 and
effort.
But
the
first
step
is
awareness.
If
you
parAcipated
in
 the
survey,
at
least
one
person
at
your
organizaAon
is
aware.
 Read
on
to
find
out
how
your
organizaAon’s
usability
maturity
 compares
with
that
of
usability‐aware
organizaAons
around
the
 globe.

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • The
Survey
 The
Survey
 

 HFI
developed
the
User
Experience
PracAce
Maturity
Survey
 An
important
note
to
readers
…
 to
capture
a
comparaAve
snapshot
of
the
maturity
of
usability
 operaAons
around
the
world.
The
components
of
maturity
 The
data
reported
here
offers
a
prac<<oner
level
analysis
of
UX
 were
derived
primarily
from
Schaffer
(2004).
These
 maturity.

It
answers
the
quesAon
:
What
proporAon
of
 components
were
augmented
by
HFI’s
subsequent
field
 (responding)
pracAAoners
feel
they
work
in
a
mature
usability
 research/consulAng
observing
the
sequence
for
emergence
of
 pracAce?
 key
success
components
within
developing
usability
pracAces.
 

 

 This
study
is
NOT
an
organizaAonal
level
analysis.
That
its,
it
 Survey
respondents
were
recruited
through
HFI
mailing
lists
 does
not
answer
the
ques<on:
What
percentage
organiza<ons
 and
various
affiliated
social
networking
channels.
Some
 have
mature
usability
prac<ces?

 evidence
of
viral
responding
was
observed.
The
survey
was
 presented
in
3
languages
(English,
Spanish
and
German).
 This
is
because
within
the
current
analysis,
mulAple
respondents
 Individuals
could
respond
from
1
April
2009
through
15
April
 from
the
same
organizaAon
are
counted.
Individual
 2009.
In
all,
1836
individuals
iniAated
the
survey.
1123
 organizaAons
are
represented
more
than
once.
 respondents
completed
the
enAre
survey.

 

 

 When
you
are
thinking
about
the
implicaAons
of
this
survey
in
 The
summaries
presented
here
reflect
completed
surveys.
In
 relaAon
to
your
organizaAon,
please
be
mindful
of
that
 return
for
their
effort,
parAcipants
were
entered
into
a
 disAncAon.

 drawing
to
receive
a
free
1
hour
strategic
consulAng
session
 with
Dr.
Eric
Schaffer,
Founder
and
CEO
of
HFI,
and
author
of
 InsAtuAonalizaAon
of
Usability:
A
Step‐by‐Step
Guide.
 

 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Organiza<on
Type
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • How
interface
design
fits….?
 Website
Builders:
We
design/build
 websites
(including
web‐based
 applicaAons).
 Applica<on/So[ware
Builder:
We
 design/build/sell
off‐the‐shelf
and/or
 customized
sooware
products.
 Applica<on/Website
Users:
We
buy
 or
build
applicaAons
or
websites
to
 run
our
business,
but
our
customers
 typically
don't
see
them.
 eCommerce
Business:
We
do
most
or
 all
of
our
customer‐facing
business
 via
the
web.
 Website
Designers:
We
design
 websites
and/or
applicaAons,
but
we
 don't
build
them.
 Product
Designer:
We
design
physical
 products.
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Where
were
the
 ArgenAna
 Germany
 Romania
 respondents
from?
 Australia
 Hong
Kong
 Russian
FederaAon
 Austria
 India
 Serbia
 Belgium
 Ireland
 Singapore
 Bolivia
 Israel
 Slovenia
 Brazil
 Italy
 South
Africa
 Bulgaria
 Lithuania
 Spain
 Canada
 Malaysia
 Sweden
 China
 Mexico
 Switzerland
 Colombia
 Netherlands
 Taiwan
 Costa
Rica
 New
Zealand
 Turkey
 Country
 Norway
 United
Arab
Emirates
 Czech
Republic
 Pakistan
 United
Kingdom
 Denmark
 Panama
 United
States
 >
100
respondents
 Egypt
 Peru
 Uruguay
 



40
‐
99
respondents
 Estonia
 Philippines
 



10
‐
39
respondents
 Finland
 Poland
 >
10
respondents
 France
 Portugal
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Execu<ve
sponsorship
‐
Champion
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Execu<ve
sponsorship
‐
Level
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Interface
standards
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Interface
standards
–
Ongoing
audit
process
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Common
method
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • UX
methods
‐
Required
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • UX
methods
–
Required
ac<vi<es
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Knowledge
management:
Shared
tools
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Knowledge
Management:
Shared
learnings
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Professional
Staff
–
Recognizing
UX

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Professional
staff
–
Full
<me
prac<<oners
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Professional
staff
–
Cer<fied
prac<<oners
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Training
–
Advanced
training
(Prac<<oners)
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Training
–
Outreach
and
awareness
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Showcase
projects
–
Recognizing
achievement
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Digital
Strategy
–
Governance
commiiee
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Digital
Strategy
–
Repor<ng
outcomes
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • Conclusions
 If
you
eavesdrop
in
elevators,
you
will
hear
that
usability
has
 No
Real
Execu<ve
Champion
Over
half
of
respondents
indicated
 transformed
from
a
business
differenAator
to
a
rouAne
 that
their
usability
efforts
lacked
a
true
execuAve
champion.
 component
of
business
pracAce.
To
some
extent
this
is
true.
 Because
of
the
lack
of
organizaAonal
recogniAon
and,
by
 HFI’s
UX
Maturity
Survey
indicates
that
stable,
visible,
internal
 extension,
funding,
these
teams
are
constantly
in
“triage”
mode.
 usability
and
user
experience
groups
with
execuAve
support
 They
do
great
work
–
but
it
is
just‐in‐Ame.
Because
they
are
just
 have
become
significantly
more
prevalent
since
Schaffer
 keeping
up,
the
group
rarely
has
Ame
to
develop
–
much
less
 (2004)
outlined
the
elements
of
a
mature
usability/user
 disseminate
–
the
foundaAonal
research
or
tools
that
could
be
 experience
pracAce.
But
having
a
presence
is
not
the
same
as
 benefit
the
organizaAon
as
a
whole.
Over
Ame,
teams
in
this
 having
a
pracAce.
 situaAon
lose
their
momentum.
Team
members
are
reabsorbed
 

 into
roles
that
sound
like
usability
roles
(e.g.,
Business
Analyst)
 The
most
common
challenges
faced
by
developing
Usability
 or
related
components
of
the
organizaAon.
CulAvaAng
a
true
 PracAces
today
are:
 execuAve
champion
is
the
necessary
next
step
for
usability
 pracAces
at
this
stage.

 • No
real
execuAve
champion
 
 • No
centralized
funcAon
 
 No
Centralized
Func<on
OrganizaAons
–
even
those
with
 • Energy
and
ExecuAve
support,
but
no
Strategy
 
 usability
awareness
–
can
fail
to
recognize
the
importance
of
a
 • A
team
that
reinvents
the
wheel

 
 visible,
centralized
funcAon.
Free‐floaAng
talent
improves
user
 

 experience,
but
in
a
spoYy
way.
Usability
pracAAoners
tend
to
 

 find
themselves
doing
other
types
of
work
(e.g.,
coding.)
Further,
 the
lack
of
visible
recogniAon
that
usability/user
experience
 represents
a
discrete
skill
set
reinforces
the
myth
that
usability
is
 just
common
sense.
Individuals
without
a
usability
background
 conAnue
to
“do
usability.”
Even
with
a
real
champion,
distributed
 professionals
can
rarely
achieve
the
momentum
necessary
to
 build
the
resources
that
mark
a
mature
pracAce.
(Those
who
do,
 find
themselves
part
of
a
centralized
group.)
CreaAng
a
 centralized
pracAce
or
funcAon
is
the
next
step
for
organizaAons
 at
this
stage.

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings
 


  • Conclusions
 Energy
and
Execu<ve
Support,
but
No
Strategy
An
 Having
a
presence
is
not
the
same
as
having
a
prac<ce
 unanAcipated
number
of
organizaAons
have
established
 usability
groups
which
operate
with
no
clear
charter,
 As
many
survey
parAcipants
(and
readers)
know,
having
a
talent
 governance,
or
accountability.
Within
this
configuraAon,
 and
passion
for
usability
is
not
enough.
For
a
team
to
be
truly
 usability
groups
can
drive
substanAal
and
valuable
 successful,
senior
leadership
must
parAcipate
acAvely.
 improvements
to
user
experience.
But
these
improvements
 UlAmately,
each
of
these
scenarios
reflects
a
failure
of
execuAve
 are
not
opAmally
linked
to
the
current
business
strategy
or
 leadership
to
understand
and
commit
the
necessary
energy,
 prioriAes.
 support
and
resources
to
realize
the
full
promise
of
usability.
 As
such,
Ame‐sensiAve
opportuniAes
can
ooen
be
missed.
 Engaging
the
execuAve
suite
to
create
a
vision
&
direcAon
 document
and
engage
in
strategy
is
the
next
step
for
 organizaAons
at
this
stage.
 

 

 
A
Team
that
Reinvents
the
Wheel
OrganizaAons
–
including
 those
with
mature
Usability
pracAces
–
systemaAcally
fail
to
 recognize
the
value
in
reusable
work.
Reports
are
generated
 but
rarely
collected
and
categorized
for
future
use.
Without
a
 central
repository
to
gather
findings
and
an
infrastructure
that
 supports
meta‐tagging
and
access,
organizaAons
may
gather
 the
same
insights
over
and
over.
The
insights
are
there
–
if
you
 know
the
right
person
to
ask.
LongAme
team
members
can
 become
a
“warehouse”
for
insights
on
a
given
consumer
 group
or
product.
The
perceived
contribuAons
and
value‐to‐ cost
raAo
of
usability
groups
in
this
situaAon
is
limited.
 OrganizaAons
in
this
situaAon
need
to
create
a
system
to
 archive
and
tag
their
output
that
encourages
findability,
use,
 and
reuse.

 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • What’s
next
…
 Where
do
you
stand?
 

 Human
Factors
InternaAonal
conducted
this
survey
to
develop
a
 HFI’s
long‐standing
relaAonship
with
numerous
Fortune
500
 snapshot
of
the
user
experience
operaAons
within
usability‐aware
 companies
–
half
of
the
Fortune
50,
in
fact
–
enables
us
to
 organizaAons
around
the
world.
Then
we
developed
the
User
 perform
ongoing
research
on
the
synergisAc
benefits
that
long‐ Experience
Maturity
Checklist
(see
Appendix
A).
The
checklist
 term
insAtuAonalizaAon
of
user
experience,
supported
by
 evaluates
your
own
organizaAon’s
usability
maturity
and
acts
as
a
 conAnuous
execuAve
championship,
is
providing
successful
 next‐step
guide.
Even
with
Schaffer’s
usability
maturity
criteria,
 enterprise
organizaAons.
Usability
maturity
is
by
definiAon
long‐ however,
there
is
no
one‐size‐fits‐all
approach
to
usability
maturity.
 term
rather
than
a
quick
fix,
and
our
analysis
consistently
reveals
 In
the
final
analysis,
the
set
of
usability
challenges
your
 increasingly
deep
levels
of
benefit
that
accrue
to
the
 organizaAon
faces
is
unique.
The
size,
structure,
market
and
culture
 organizaAon.

 of
your
organizaAon
all
determine
the
path
it
needs
to
take
to
 

 usability
maturity,
in
addiAon
to
its
present
level
of
user‐centricity
 and
the
types
of
management
“syndromes”
that
must
be
 overcome.
For
some
organizaAons,
the
results
of
this
survey
will
 clearly
suggest
a
user
experience
strategy
that
will
move
it
towards
 the
insAtuAonalizaAon
of
usability.
For
many,
however,
working
 with
the
experienced
user
experience
strategists
at
Human
Factors
 InternaAonal
will
be
the
most
effecAve
way
to
interpret
and
apply
 the
survey
data
from
this
survey
to
their
present
level
of
usability
 maturity.
 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • References
 Schaffer,
E.
(2004),
The
InsAtuAonalizaAon
of
Usability:
A
step‐ by‐step
guide.
Addison
Wesley:
New
York.
 

 Straub,
K.
(2004),
On
the
Meta‐Usability
of
User
Interface
 Standards
(or
If
the
developer
can't
use
it,
the
standard
is
not
 there).
User
Interface
Design
Update
newsleYer,
available
from
 www.humanfactors.com/downloads/aug04.asp.
 

 The
HFI
UX
Maturity
Survey
–
2009
/
Findings

  • 19
June
2009