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  • Review chapter objectives.
  • Explain comparison and contrast.
  • Discuss hints for writing a comparison or contrast paragraph.
  • Discuss subject-by-subject and point-by-point organization.Share examples of subject-by-subject and point-by-point organization.
  • Discuss transitions and share INFO Box Information.
  • Review steps to writing a comparison or contrast paragraph.
  • As a class, make a list of the differences between cell phones and traditional house phones. Discuss points of contrast and adding details to the points.
  • As a class, develop a topic sentence for a contrast paragraph about cell phones and traditional house phones.
  • Model drafting and revising a contrast paragraph about cell phones and traditional house phones.Review the checklist for revising the draft of a contrast paragraph.
  • Review proofreading a point-by-point and subject-by-subject pattern paragraph.Demonstrate proofreading the contrast paragraph on cell phones and traditional house phones.
  • Review Lines of Detail, Topics for Writing, and Topics for Critical Thinking and Writing sections.

Transcript

  • 1. Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 2. CHAPTER 6: COMPARISON AND CONTRASTCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 3. CHAPTER OUTLINE AND LEARNING OBJECTIVESIn this chapter, you will learn to: compare or contrast two entities, demonstrate knowledge of the subject-by- subject and point-by-point patterns of exposition, and write a process paragraph that incorporates appropriate transitions for a specific pattern.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 4. WHAT IS COMPARISON? WHAT IS CONTRAST? To compare means to point out similarities. To contrast means to point out differences. When you compare or contrast, you need to come to some conclusion.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 5. WHAT IS COMPARISON? WHAT IS CONTRAST? Hints for writing a comparison or contrast paragraph 1. Limit your topic. 2. Avoid the obvious topic. 3. Make your point in the topic sentence of your comparison or contrast paragraph. 4. Do not announce in the topic sentence. 5. Make sure your topic sentence has a focus. 6. In the topic sentence, cover both subjects to be compared or contrasted.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 6. WHAT IS COMPARISON? WHAT IS CONTRAST? Organizing Your Comparison or Contrast Paragraph  Subject-by-Subject Organization  Support and explain your topic sentence by first writing all your details on one subject and then writing all your details on the other subject.  Be sure to discuss the points for your second subject in the same order as you did for the first subject.  Point-by-Point Organization  Support and explain your topic sentence by discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between your subjects.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 7. WHAT IS COMPARISON? WHAT IS CONTRAST? Using Transitions Effectively  How and when you use transitions in a comparison or contrast paragraph depend on the answers to two questions: 1. Are you writing a comparison or contrast paragraph? 2. Are you organizing your paragraph in the point- by-point or subject-by-subject pattern?  INFO BOX: Transitions for a Comparison or Contrast ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 8. WRITING THE COMPARISON ORCONTRAST PARAGRAPH IN STEPS  PrewritingComparison or Contrast—how to generate and develop ideas for your comparison or contrast paragraph  Planning Comparison or Contrast—how to organize your ideas for your comparison or contrast paragraph  Drafting and Revising Comparison or Contrast—how to create, revise, and edit rough drafts of your comparison or contrast paragraph  Proofreading Comparison or Contrast—how to proofread and make one final check of your comparison or contrast paragraph Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 9. PREWRITING A COMPARISON OR CONTRAST List Differences or Similarities  See whether there are more similarities or differences.  Decide which approach to use. Getting Points of Comparison or Contrast  Whether you compare or contrast, you are looking for points of comparison or contrast, items you can discuss about both subjects. Adding Details to Your Points  Once you have points, add details to them.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 10. PLANNING COMPARISON OR CONTRAST With a topic sentence, begin to draft an outline. Decide the pattern you want to use. Checklist for an Outline of a Comparison or Contrast ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 11. DRAFTING AND REVISING COMPARISON OR CONTRAST Drafting a Paragraph  Add details and transitions The Draft Checklist for Revising the Draft of a Comparison or Contrast ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 12. PROOFREADINGCOMPARISON OR CONTRAST Contrast Paragraph: Point-by-Point Pattern  Check for errors in spelling, grammar, or preparation. The Same Contrast Paragraph: Subject-by-Subject Pattern  Check for errors in spelling, punctuation, typing, and copying.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 13. PROOFREADINGCOMPARISON OR CONTRAST Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment Topics for Writing a Comparison or a Contrast Paragraph Topics for Critical Thinking and WritingCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 14. WHAT IS COMPARISON?A. Explains how to do something.B. Points out differences.C. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.D. Points out similarities.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 15. WHAT IS COMPARISON?A. Explains how to do something.B. Points out differences.C. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.D. Points out similarities.compare or contrast two entitiesCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 16. WHAT IS CONTRAST?A. Explains how to do something.B. Points out differences.C. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.D. Points out similarities.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 17. WHAT IS CONTRAST?A. Explains how to do something.B. Points out differences.C. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.D. Points out similarities.compare or contrast two entitiesCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 18. SUBJECT-BY-SUBJECT ORGANIZATION INVOLVESA. Writing all of the details on one subject and then writing all of the details on the other subject.B. Discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between subjects.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 19. SUBJECT-BY-SUBJECT ORGANIZATION INVOLVESA. Writing all of the details on one subject and then writing all of the details on the other subject.B. Discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between subjects.demonstrate knowledge of the subject-by-subjectand point-by-point patterns of expositionCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 20. POINT-BY-POINT ORGANIZATION INVOLVESA. Writing all of the details on one subject and then writing all of the details on the other subject.B. Discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between subjects.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 21. POINT-BY-POINT ORGANIZATION INVOLVESA. Writing all of the details on one subject and then writing all of the details on the other subject.B. Discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between subjects.demonstrate knowledge of the subject-by-subject andpoint-by-point patterns of expositionCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 22. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS A COMMON TRANSITIONFOR A COMPARISON PARAGRAPH? A. except B. although C. furthermore D. whereas Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 23. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS A COMMON TRANSITIONFOR A COMPARISON PARAGRAPHA. exceptB. althoughC. furthermoreD. whereaswrite a process paragraph that incorporatesappropriate transitions for a specific pattern.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 24. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS NOT A COMMONTRANSITION FOR A CONTRAST PARAGRAPH? A. despite B. likewise C. otherwise D. nevertheless Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 25. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS NOT A COMMONTRANSITION FOR A CONTRAST PARAGRAPH? A. despite B. likewise C. otherwise D. nevertheless write a process paragraph that incorporates appropriate transitions for a specific pattern. Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.