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Chapter 1
 

Chapter 1

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  • Review chapter objectives.
  • Shareexamples of well-written paragraphs.
  • Discuss an overview of the writing process.
  • Model freewriting, brainstorming, and journal writing about a favorite city. After modeling, divide the class into three groups. Group 1 students will freewrite. Group 2 students will brainstorm. Group 3 will write journal entries. All three groups will engage in prewriting activities about a favorite or least favorite relative for fifteen minutes. Allow each group to share their freewriting, brainstorming, and journal writing.
  • Model narrowing a range of ideas by underlining ideas about your favorite city and then selecting a topic from the list. In the same three groups, allow students to narrow the range of ideas about their favorite/least favorite relative and select a topic from the list.
  • Demonstrateadding more details to your favorite city list. Allow students the opportunity to add more details to their favorite/least favorite relative lists.
  • Model mapping ideas about favorite city. Allow students to map ideas in groups about favorite or least favorite relative.
  • Model forming a good topic sentence about your favorite city by reviewing the contents of your prewriting activities. Allow students to write topic sentences about their favorite/least favorite relative. Share topic sentences in groups.
  • Review steps to prewriting a paragraph.
  • Modelconstructing an outline using the content from the prewriting activities about your favorite city. Allow students to complete outlines in groups about their favorite/least favorite relative. Discuss how to add details and eliminate details during the planning stage.
  • Discuss the checklist for an outline and have students use it as a guide for their outlines. Show examples of paragraphs that are good models of time order, emphatic order, and space order.
  • Modelwriting out the outline about your favorite city in paragraph form. Allow students to write out outlines about favorite/least favorite relative in paragraph form. Model revising the paragraph. Have students exchange papers in partner groups for a peer review of the newly constructed paragraphs about the favorite/least favorite relative. Once peer reviews are conducted, allow students to revise paragraphs based on suggestions from the peer review sessions.
  • Model using the revision checklist as a guide for your paragraph on your favorite city. Allow students the opportunity to usethe revision checklist with their paragraph about their favorite/least favorite relative.
  • Think-aloud to model selecting a good title for the newly constructed paragraph about your favorite city. Demonstrate proofreading for errors in the paragraph. Allow students to exchange papers with a different classmate. This exchange will provide a fresh set of eyes for proofreading each student’s paragraph. Have students proofread their new partner’s paragraph about their favorite/least favorite relative.
  • Review the stages of the writing process.
  • Discuss critical thinking and how it impacts the writing process. Explain that critical thinking and writing options will be at the end of each chapter.
  • Lines of Detail Assignment: Students choose one of three sentences: 1) The most frightening movie I’ve ever seen was _________________________ (fill in the title). 2) If money were no problem, the car I’d buy is ____________________ (fill in the name of the car). 3) The one food I refuse to eat is _____________________ (fill in the name of food). Once topic sentence is chosen, have students get in groups with students that also selected the same sentence. In each respective group, have students create 10 brainstorming questions about topic. Have students work independently to answer brainstorming questions. Have students draft an outline of the paragraph. Have students prepare a first draft. Allow students to return to groups and share drafts. Each group member should make one positive comment and one suggestion for revision about each student’s paragraph. Have students revise and edit their drafts taking group member’s suggestions into consideration. Allow students to prepare a final version of the paragraph for submission.
  • Assign topics for writing a paragraph and topics for critical thinking and writing for independent work.

Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CHAPTER 1: WRITING A PARAGRAPHCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CHAPTER OUTLINE AND LEARNING OBJECTIVESIn this chapter, you will learn to: recognize and write clear topic sentences, engage in planning and revision strategies, and write a paragraph reflecting effective unity, support, and coherence.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHAT IS THE ROLE OF A PARAGRAPH? The paragraph is the basic building block of any essay.  Itis a group of sentences focusing on one idea or one point.  Focusing on one idea or one point gives a paragraph unity.  Typically, paragraphs will be between seven and twelve sentences long.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • THE WRITING PROCESS Prewriting—how to generate and develop ideas for your paragraph Planning—how to organize your ideas Drafting and Revising—how to create, revise, and edit rough drafts Proofreading—how to proofread and make one final checkCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH Keep three things in mind:  Topic  Purpose  Audience Freewriting, Brainstorming, and Keeping a Journal  Freewriting is a technique that involves writing whatever comes into your mind on your subject.  Brainstorming is similar to freewriting, but you pause to ask yourself questions that will lead to new ideas.  A journal is a notebook of your personal writing, a notebook in which you write regularly and often.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH Finding Specific Ideas  Narrow your range of ideas Selecting One Topic  Once you have a list of specific ideas that can lead you to a specific topic, you can pick one topic. Adding Details to a Specific Topic  Develop the specific topic you selected in a number of ways: 1. Check your list for other ideas that seem to fit with the specific topic you’ve picked.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH 2. Brainstorm-ask yourself more questions about your topic, and use the answers as details. 3. List any new ideas you have that may be connected to your topic. Info Box: Beginning the Prewriting: A Summary 1. Think on paper and write down any ideas that you have about a topic. 2. Scan your writing for specific ideas that have come from your first efforts. 3. Pick one specific idea.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH Focusing the Prewriting  Use two techniques: 1. Marking a list of related ideas 2. Mapping related ideas Listing Related Ideas  Mark the list of ideas  Group related ideas Mapping  Mark the list of ideas  Cluster the related ideas into separate listsCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH Forming a Topic Sentence  Review your details and see if you can form some general idea that can summarize the details.  Write that general idea as one sentence. Writing Good Topic Sentences  A topic sentence states the main idea that you have developed on a topic.  Topic sentences do not announce; they make a point.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PREWRITING A PARAGRAPH Focusing the Prewriting: A Summary  Follow these steps: 1. Try marking a list of related details, or try mapping to group your ideas. 2. Write a topic sentence that summarizes your details. 3. Check that your topic sentence is a sentence, not a topic. Make sure that it is not too broad or too narrow and that it is not an announcement. Check that it makes a point and focuses the details you have developed.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PLANNING A PARAGRAPH Checking Your Details  Begin working on an outline for your paragraph.  An outline is a plan that helps you stay focused in your writing.  The outline takes shape when you write your topic sentence and write your list of details beneath the topic sentence. Adding Details When There Are Not Enough  Brainstorm to add more details. Eliminating Details That Do Not Relate to the Topic SentenceCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PLANNING A PARAGRAPH From List to Outline  An organized, logical list will make your writing unified since each item on the list will relate to your topic sentence.  After you scan your list, develop an outline of the paragraph.  Checklist for an Outline Coherence: Putting Your Details in Proper Order  The most logical order for a paragraph depends on the subject of the paragraph. 1. Time order 2. Emphatic order 3. Space orderCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • DRAFTING AND REVISING A PARAGRAPH Drafting a Paragraph  Writing out the outline in paragraph form.  You may write several drafts. Revising  Revising means rewriting the draft by making changes in the structure, in the order of the sentences, and in the content.  Editing includes making changes in the choice of words, in the selection of details, in punctuation, and in the pattern and kinds of sentences.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • DRAFTING AND REVISING A PARAGRAPH  Also includes adding transitions, which are words, phrases, or sentences that link ideas.  Checklist for Revising the Draft of a Paragraph (with key terms)Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • PROOFREADING A PARAGRAPH Give Your Paragraph a Title  The title should be short and should fit the subject of the paragraph. The Final Version of a ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • REVIEWING THE WRITING PROCESS INFO BOX: The Stages of the Writing Process  Prewriting  Planning  Drafting and Revising  ProofreadingCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CRITICAL THINKING AND THE WRITING PROCESS Critical Thinking and the Writing Process  Brainstorming involves critical thinking.  Critical thinking is a type of reasoning that has several meanings and practical uses.  Critical thinking plays a vital role in writing effectively.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CRITICAL THINKING AND THE WRITING PROCESS Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment  Pick one topic sentence and fill in the blank.  Get in groups with students that selected the same sentence and brainstorm.  Independently, begin to think on paper.  Draft an outline of the paragraph.  Write a first draft.  Share the draft with the members of your group.  Revise and edit the draft.  Prepare a final version of the paragraph.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • CRITICAL THINKING AND THE WRITING PROCESS Topics for Writing a Paragraph Topics for Critical Thinking and WritingCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHAT IS A PARAGRAPH?A. The basic building block of an essay.B. A sentence that summarizes the details.C. A plan that helps you stay focused in your writing.D. A type of reasoning.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHAT IS A PARAGRAPH?A. The basic building block of an essay.B. A sentence that summarizes the details.C. A plan that helps you stay focused in your writing.D. A type of reasoning.Write a paragraph reflecting effectiveunity, support, and coherence.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • HOW LONG SHOULD A PARAGRAPH BE?A. 2–3 sentencesB. 4–6 sentencesC. 5–9 sentencesD. 7–12 sentencesCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • HOW LONG SHOULD A PARAGRAPH BE?A. 2–3 sentencesB. 4–6 sentencesC. 5–9 sentencesD. 7–12 sentencesWrite a paragraph reflecting effective unity, support,and coherence.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS NOT A STAGE OF THEWRITING PROCESS? A. Prewriting B. Composing C. Planning D. Proofreading Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS NOT A STAGE OF THEWRITING PROCESS? A. Prewriting B. Composing C. Planning D. Proofreading engage in planning and revision strategies, and Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXAMPLE OF A TOPICSENTENCE? A. A little school in North Carolina B. I like school. C. Congestion at the school parking deck is causing many problems for students. D. Freedom from school Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
  • WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXAMPLE OF A TOPICSENTENCE? A. A little school in North Carolina B. I like school. C. Congestion at the school parking deck is causing many problems for students. D. Freedom from school recognize and write clear topic sentences, Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.