Iowa Core March, 1120 09
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Iowa Core March, 1120 09

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Presentation for IPTV on March 11, 2009 - 3:30 - 5:00. The Role of Teacher Librarians and the Iowa Core Curriculum. (Updated with some background notes in the PPT, March 12)

Presentation for IPTV on March 11, 2009 - 3:30 - 5:00. The Role of Teacher Librarians and the Iowa Core Curriculum. (Updated with some background notes in the PPT, March 12)

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Iowa Core March, 1120 09 Iowa Core March, 1120 09 Presentation Transcript

  • Kristin Steingreaber GPAEA Media Specialist IPTV Registration Handouts HTTP://IATEACHERLIBRARIANS.NING.COM/FORUM ICN Session MARCH 11, 2009 POSTED 3-12-09 WITH BACKGROUND NOTES The Role of the Teacher Librarian in the Iowa Core
  • Mindset of the School
    • Mission involves the work of Iowa Core Curriculum
    • STUDENTS AS PASSIVE PROCESSORS
    • SIGNIFICANT DROPOUT RATES NATIONAL EDUCATION SUMMIT ON HIGH SCHOOLS COLLEGE INSTRUCTORS
    • BUSINESS NECESSITY
    • RESEARCH
    Background
    • Michael Welsh - http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/ Revisiting – About Us
    • Joyce Valenza –
    • http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/blog/1340000334.html
    • Iowa Core Overview*
    • Implementation Plans
    • Year One: Leadership Vision of students
    • Iowa Dept. of Education
    • www.iowa.gov/educate
    • Iowa Core Curriculum
    • www.corecurriculum.iowa.gov
    • District and accredited nonpublic schools must:
    • 1. Respond to all outcomes and targets of the implementation plan
      • Due July 1, 2010, for grades 9-12
      • Due July 1, 2012, for grades K-8
    • 1/4
    Implementation:
    • 2. Complete an initial alignment of local content with Core Curriculum Essential Concepts and Skill Sets in Literacy, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and 21 st Century Skills (Civic Literacy, Health Literacy, Financial Literacy, Technology Literacy, and Employability Skills) and steps to address any gaps
      • Due July 1, 2012, for grades 9-12
      • Due 2013-2014, for grades K-8
      • 2/4
    Implementation:
    • 3. Complete initial analysis of alignment of content, instruction, assessment, and steps to address gaps
      • Due July 1, 2012, for 9-12
      • Due July 1, 2014, for K-8
      • 3/4
    Implementation:
    • 4. Complete initial analysis of professional development needs in the areas of instruction and assessment and integrate into the District Professional Development Plans (following CSIP procedures)
      • Due July 1, 2012, for 9-12
      • Due 2013-2014, for K-8
      • 4/4
    Implementation:
    • Overview – Vision
    • Full implementation is accomplished when the school or district is able to provide evidence that an ongoing process is in place to ensure that each and every student is learning the Essential Concepts and Skill Sets of the Iowa Core Curriculum.
    • Each AEA and DE rep are currently working with leadership teams throughout the state. GPAEA – Programs and Services - http://www.gpaea.k12.ia.us/programs--services/iowa-core-curriculum.aspx
    • AEA 267 http://www.aea267.k12.ia.us/icc/
    • AEA 11 - http://www.aea11.k12.ia.us/icc/
  • Six Outcomes in Implementation
    • Leadership
    • Community Involvement
    • Schools
  • Six Outcomes in Implementation
    • Instruction and Assessment
    • Professional Development
    • Effective Instructional Practices
  • Common Understanding
    • Which of the following is correct:
      • A. The DE will work with the AEA’s to provide technical expertise to local schools.
      • B. The DE will provide the AEA Network with assistance to prepare local schools to examine their curriculum.
      • C. The DE will establish work teams to support a focus on leadership, content alignment, instruction and assessment and monitoring and evaluation.
      • D. A. B. and C.
      • E. None of the above.
    From DE Leadership 1
  • Common Understanding
    • Which of the following are correct?
      • A. All schools are required to use the same text book per course.
      • B. All schools are expected to the same lesson plans per course and teach those lessons on the same schedule.
      • C. The Iowa Test of Basic Skills and the Iowa Test of Educational Development will be replaced with a new statewide assessment.
      • D. None of the above.
    From DE Leadership 1
  • Our Role
    • Get on the Team
    • Review the Leadership documents
    • Share accurate information
    • CONTENT
    • INSTRUCTION
    • ASSESSMENT
    Curriculum is
  • Common Understanding
    • Which of the following will each school need to do to implement the core curriculum?
      • A. Align the content of the local curriculum with the concepts and skills in the Iowa Core Curriculum
      • B. Provide rigorous and relevant instruction.
      • C. Align assessments with the concepts and skills from the core curriculum
      • D. All of the above.
    From DE Leadership 1
    • ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND CONCEPTS
    • NEW WEB SITE:
    • WWW.CORECURRICULUM.IOWA.GOV
    Content
    • http://www.corecurriculum.iowa.gov/ 9-12 Grade Reading
    • http://www.corecurriculum.iowa.gov/Discipline.aspx?C=Literacy&D=Reading
    • Also information literacy in entire Literacy document – search PDF
    • http://www.iowa.gov/educate/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=674&Itemid=1249
  • Essential Concept: IA Core – Reading 2
    • Reads for a variety of purposes and across content areas
  • Essential Concept: IA Core – Writing 5
    • Engages in the information literacy process: accesses, evaluates, and communicates information and
    • ideas
  • Essential Concept: IA Core – Writing 5
    • Engages in the information literacy process: accesses, evaluates, and communicates information and
    • ideas
    • Detail from Writing 5 -
    • Generating effective questions
    • Articulating a clear research question or thesis statement
    • Using appropriate means for locating and selecting research materials,
    • Using information from a variety of sources, both print and electronic including electronic databases, the Internet, periodicals, interviews, surveys, books, and other informational publications
    • Evaluating, interpreting, and selecting information
    • Communicating research findings through a variety of means, both written and spoken
    • Using technology effectively to communicate research findings
    • Incorporating research findings without plagiarizing and adhering to a consistent format for documentation
  • What are Rigorous Tasks?
    • Think deeply about a problem
    • Analyze new situations
    • Interpret and synthesize knowledge
    • Bring ideas together in a new or creative way
    • Develop and justify their own criteria for evaluation
    • Are intellectually challenged
    Critical Thinking & Deep Discussions
  • When Is Learning Relevant?
    • Value beyond school
    • Addresses an actual problem of contemporary significance
    • Builds on students’ real-life experiences
    • Has students communicate knowledge beyond the classroom
    • Students recognize the connection between classroom knowledge and situations outside the classroom
    • Critical Thinking & Deep Discussions
  • 21 st Century Skills – Iowa Core
    • Developed after thorough investigation:
      • Partnership for 21st Century Skills
      • enGauge
      • SCANS
      • Contextually related national standards Explore the relationship with AASL standards and 21 st Century Skills in Jean Donham’s article: Standards! Standards! Standards!
  • 21 st Century Skills include
    • Health literacy
    • Financial literacy
    • Employability Skills
    • Civic literacy (Linked within Social Studies)
    • Technology literacy
  • Iowa Core Technology Literacy – Essential Concepts and/or Skills - Grades 6-8
    • Demonstrate creative thinking in the design and development of innovative technology products and problem solving.
    • Collaborate with peers, experts, and others using interactive technology.
    • Plan strategies utilizing digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
    • Use critical thinking skills to conduct research, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate technological tools and resources.
    • Understand the legal and ethical issues of technology as related to individuals, cultures, and societies.
    • Understand the underlying structure and application of technology systems.
  • Check out the Site
  • Iowa DE site – Iowa Core
    • Starting at the DE site, link to the ICC web site to find examples of essentials concepts and skills for some of the other areas:
    • 21 st Century Skills
    • Social Studies
    • Math
    • Science There are ways we can work with teachers in all of these areas.
    • Know Our Own Curriculum
    • Available Resources:
    • IASL Professional Development http://profdev.iasl.iowapages.org/
    • Information Literacy Framework
    • AASL Standards
    • ISTE NETS
    • Partnership for 21 st Century
      • Class Opportunities
  • Iowa Core Curriculum Example
  •  
    • Detail from Writing 5 -
    • Generating effective questions
    • Articulating a clear research question or thesis statement
    • Using appropriate means for locating and selecting research materials,
    • Using information from a variety of sources, both print and electronic including electronic databases, the Internet, periodicals, interviews, surveys, books, and other informational publications
    • Evaluating, interpreting, and selecting information
    • Communicating research findings through a variety of means, both written and spoken
    • Using technology effectively to communicate research findings
    • Incorporating research findings without plagiarizing and adhering to a consistent format for documentation
  • Sample Library Example
    • Slides 32 – 41 are meant to be a sample of how the AASL standards fit the Iowa Core essential concept for Writing (slide 21, 30, 31) .
    • A brief example linking our curriculum goals together.
  • School Library Example
    • Skills 1.1.1 Follow an inquiry-based process 1.1.3 Develop a range of questions 1.1.4 Find, evaluate and select appropriate sources to answer questions 1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools
    • Dispositions in Action
    • 1.2.1. Display engagement by posing questions
  • School Library Example
    • Responsibilities 1.3.1. Respect copyright / intellectual property
    • Self-Assessment Strategies
    • 1.4.1. Monitor own information-seeking progress and adapt as necessary
  • Questions?
    • 1.1.3 Develop a range of questions
    • What happened in the 1950s…
      • That was significant?
      • Made a difference in our world today?
      • Most changed our world?
      • Made the greatest impact?
  • Sources
  • AP Images – How do images change my questions?
    • Jefferson Thomas and Elizabeth Eckford
    • Terrance Roberts
    • Little Rock Central High School
    • 1959
    • Roberts places a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial
    • -----------------------
    • 1.4.1. Monitor own information-seeking progress and adapt as necessary
    • MARCH 2009 ISSUE – LITERACY 2.0
    • Reference AASL Standards
    • Stepping Beyond Wikipedia – Badke, P. 54-58
    • Rethinking Online Reading Assessment – Coiro, P. 59-63
    Educational Leadership
  • 1. Expect students to give credit for resources
    • Responsibilities 1.3.1.
    • Respect copyright / intellectual property
    • NoodleTools is one possibility.
    • Informal is also as powerful as formal.
  • 2. Expect sharing
    • www.slideshare.net
  • EBSCOHost – Images and Bookmarks
  • 3. Expect students to use online databases to learn
    • Using Atomic Learning video clips for Web 2.0 bookmarks
    • Iowa Core Using information from a variety of sources, both print and electronic including electronic databases, the Internet, periodicals, interviews, surveys, books, and other informational publications
  • Examples of rigorous/ relevant instruction
    • Let It Snow – Learning & Leading with Technology, Feb. 2009
    • Barbara Jansen’s examples
    • Banking on Banks – SLMAM – Feb. 2009
    • Join the conversation at
    • http://iateacherlibrarians.ning.com/forum
  • Our Role
    • Understand our Curriculum and Iowa Core
    • Plan our units with teachers thinking content, instruction and assessment
    • DIFFERENTIATION
    • ENGAGED LEARNERS CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION
    • NEW WEB SITE:
    • WWW.CORECURRICULUM.IOWA.GOV
    Instruction
  • Background
    • Shift From:
    • To:
    • Primary focus on reading and writing in Language Arts
    • Integration & practical application of all 5 literacy skills
    • Reading
    • Writing
    • Speaking
    • Viewing
    • Listening
    • Across Content Areas
    Literacy
    • IPTV video clips – Literacy http://www.iptv.org/video/browse.cfm/collection/76
    • The video clips from literacy, math and science are meant to be samples. This work is also in progress, as we go forward. They are not intended to be lessons that must be used.
    • Shift From:
    • To:
    • Memorizing and practicing facts & procedures
    • Understanding and applying concepts and facts
    Mathematics
    • IPTV video clips – Math http://www.iptv.org/video/browse.cfm/collection/77
    • IPTV video clips - Science http://www.iptv.org/video/browse.cfm/collection/75
    • Shift From:
    • To:
    • Lecture, over-emphasis on textbook and “cookbook” labs
    • Learning through actively
    • Investigating
    • Designing experiments
    • Questioning
    • Exploring
    • Defending Conclusions
    Science
  • The DE encourages people to continue
    • Every Child Reads (Adolescent Literacy, too)
    • Every Student Counts
    • Every Learner Inquires – new These initiatives which have helped teachers learn strategies are important to the Iowa Core Curriculum
    • Also IDM and work with differentiation
  • ELI – Every Learner Inquires -background
    • Know why you do inquiry! Avoid "Activity mania".
    • Do Formative Assessment - doing probes while you are instructing.
    • Inquiry - Collect Evidence - Give Evidence for why that is true.
  • The 5 Es – ELI - background
    • Engagement
    • Explore - Remember not "Activity Mania“
    • Explain – What they saw, observed, research - evidence Connection - "What Did Other Scientists Find in their Research?“
    • Elaboration – Transfer Knowledge to Another Situation
    • Evaluation
    • TEACHING FOR UNDERSTANDING
    • RIGOR AND RELEVANCE
    • TEACHING FOR LEARNER DIFFERENCES
    • STUDENT-CENTERED CLASSROOMS
    • ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING
    Characteristics of Effective Instruction
  •  
  • Video Clips Shared with Leadership 2009
    • 1. Team Teaching: Two Teachers, Three Subjects, One Project
    •  
    • A pair of educators thoughtfully discusses their art, biology and multimedia program. Access this 4 min. 35 second clip at http://www.edutopia.org/collaboration-age-technology-blood-bank-video Look for evidence of the 5 Characteristics of Effective Instruction
    • Iowa CORE
    • Librarians as Learning Specialists
    • Teaching Through Inquiry Teaching for Understanding Student-Centered Classrooms
    • Opportunity grew out of students’ natural curiosity – p. 65-66
    • Steps to Designing Inquiry-based Units*
    • Our space – Learning Commons
    • IA Core
    • Librarians as Learning Specialists
    • Teaching for Learner Differences
    • Instructors focused on challenging essential question that sparked students’ interest
    • Physical spaces conducive to the nature of the work
    • IA Core
    • Librarians as Learning Specialists
    • Teaching for Learner Differences
    • Changing Student Population
      • Expect seamless learning environment –work, play, study (Prensky 2001)
      • Digital natives, but do not necessarily have discriminative powers to be thoughtful and successful users of information technology (School Libraries Task Force 2006, Valenza 2006)
  •  
    • Flip This Library – David Loertscher
    A: Library Web site pushes information one way-toward the student. Result? They ignore it. B: The library Web site turns into a collaborative virtual learning commons where everyone is sharing resources and ideas. A: The OPAC is a one-way information system. B: The OPAC becomes a collaborative information system. Hint: Fish4Info.org. A: Students are at the mercy of the entire Internet. B: Students build their own information spaces to control the Internet. A: I have a book club or two depending on my time. B: Dozens of student-run book clubs exist in virtual space; learner led/adult coached. A: Library spaces that have a single function because bookshelves, computers get in the way. B: Total flexibility over learning commons space so that areas can be easily reconfigured on demand.
    • IA Core
    • Librarians as Learning Specialists
    • Authentic Work
    • More meaningful intellectual pursuits then simply knowing the “right answer”
  • Technology
    • Atomic Learning – Blogging Workshop
    • EBSCO: SLJ 12/2007 – Listen Up! Podcasts SLJ 2/2009 – Share Your Story! – Content Aligned Games Bid on power plants and limited natural resources in an effort to power a grid of cities. Can you win by going green? 14+
  • Redefining Literacy for the 21 st Century by David F. Warlick
    • Establish a digital library of student-produced digital products
    • Make sure computer work stations give access to productivity tools
    • Set up one or more computers as a display station for student work
    • Establish a section of the media center Web site to showcase student productions
    • p. 61
  • If this is the classroom – what does the library look like?
  • Science in the library: Outrageous Collaborative Ideas
    • Mini Theme: STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics
    • Science in the Library: Outrageous Collaborative Ideas
    • LMC – Aug/Sept. 2008 , p. 20 - 24
  • Add your picture!
    • Callison – Table 1: A Rubric for Inquiry
    • Exploration
    • Conversation
    • and Discovery.
    • FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
    • NEW WEB SITE:
    • WWW.CORECURRICULUM.IOWA.GOV
    Assessment
  • NOT This!
  • Formative Assessment
    • Planned process
    • Used by both teachers and students
    • Takes place during instruction
    • Helps teachers and students make adjustments that will improve student achievement Margaret Heritage – EBSCO article
    • Think of how dispositions in AASL Standards can fit here
  • Pursuing Personal & Aesthetic Growth
    • Exit Slip – Zmuda, p. 88
    • What recommendations would you make to other students about this book?
      • I would highly recommend because ____
      • I would recommend but would want to warn them in advance that _____
      • I would not recommend because _____
  • Inquiring and Gaining Knowledge
    • Evaluating Quality – Abilock, p. 90
    • Pick one general source. Was this specialized enough? Explore and compare to a more in-depth source on your list.
    • Pick a source in which the author is the authority. How did you know this?
  • Drawing Conclusions and Creating New Knowledge
    • Evaluating Blogs– Valenza, p. 92
    • Who is the blogger?
    • How many people link to it?
    • How current are the posts?
    • Is there a substantial archive?
    • Shift From - Success Is:
    • To - Success Is:
    • Number of staff members who collaborate
    • Doing whatever is asked in order to be recognized as valuable or important
    • Quality of work done in the library
    • Investing resources in those tasks that are central to the library and school mission
    From Zmuda & Harada, p. 40
    • Shift From - Success Is:
    • To - Success Is:
    • Helping students find what they are looking for
    • Engaging students in the construction of deep knowledge through the exploration of ideas and information, conducting of investigations & communication and evaluation of findings
    From Zmuda & Harada, p. 40
    • Shift From - Success Is:
    • To - Success Is:
    • Number of instructional sessions held in the library media center
    • Student learning that resulted from the completion of work centered on subject area and information literacy goals
    From Zmuda & Harada, p. 40
    • Know your curriculum
    • Identify the school’s goals and priorities
    • Determine the library’s contribution to the school’s goals
    • Identify specific learning targets
    • Understand and use assessments
    • Redefine your library space to fit the needs
    • Include Technology In Meaningful Ways
  •  
  • THANK YOU! Bibliography will be available on the Ning!