ISI 5121 Trove Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
196
On Slideshare
195
From Embeds
1
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 1

http://esis-iportfolio.rdc.uottawa.ca 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Trove is a website but is like a hub or portal because it is a combination of several websites with many different types of information resources.One search nets you books, maps, photos, newspaper articles, videos etc. When you search for a topic, for example a person, it provides information available about that person and information created by that person. So, when you search for Edward Barton Australia’s first Prime Minister, you can get Newspaper articles with references to him , Photos of him, as well as papers published by him and books written about him.You will also see lists that people have prepared where Edward Barton appears…. For example a list of Australia’s Prime Ministers.
  • Trove was designed to:provide a single point of access to the resources of the deep web…. Resources you would usually not find with a Google search for example.facilitate access to a significantly greater range of resources from major sources, including selected digitized material freely available onlinesupport searching of, and access to, full-text contentenhance ease of discovery by providing improved relevance ranking, refinement by facets, grouping of all editions of the same book (this is known as FRBR-like grouping) and exploitation of thesauriengage with communities and individuals through annotation servicesensure that relevant information is not missed in a search by reducing the need to search material-specific discovery services separatelyprovide a platform for niche services to query a vast resource of Australian metadata and adapt if for their own needs.
  • Trove has managed to make many Australian people take Community ownership of the site and contents.By keeping the topics mostly domain specific, with the domain being Anything and everything related to Australia and Australians, they have engendered their people to have National pride in their heritage….. And brought incredible value to library services and librarians. The user is central to the whole endeavor!Ease of use and opportunity for interaction are geared towards the user…… Accessibility Certification is a testament to that. One of the ways in which you refine your search for books is in Braille.
  • Daily, weekly, monthly and annual statistics are provided on the main results page…… Totals since launch are also provided and updated every few days.Registered users are able to provide metadata and content…. But most content appears to be from other libraries.
  • Trove calls them Collection views, Categories or ZonesA "work" (or "resource") may be as simple as a newspaper article or as complex a book available in hundreds of editions and dozens of translations. Some works (such as audio books) are present in more than one zone.
  • Almost all can be refined by Format, Availability, Decade etc….Journals, articles and research - Articles, periodicals, dataset, reviewsBooks -Braille, Illustrated, Large Print, audio booksMaps-Aerial, atlas, electronicDiaries, letters, archives-Published, Un PublishedLists -Decade, subjectMusic, sound and video - Interview, lecture, recorded music, audio booksDigitized Newspapers and more - The Sydney Morning Herald, Daily NewsPeople and organization - Biographies, Occupation, Date of Birth, Pictures, photos, objects - Photos, Posters, Art work, objectsArchived websites (1996 - now) - Keywords: Australia, Arts, Politics
  • Thank you Sherin,I will be talking about indexing languages used and give you a little behind-the-scenes look into TroveFirst I will go with the basics- there are three types of indexing languages that are available- natural language indexing, free text indexing and controlled vocabularies. Trove contains all three.Trove uses *click* full text indexing as the natural language form of indexing and *click* user tags and social tagging as the free text form.
  • With regards to controlled vocabularies, although Library of Congress Subject Headings are present for subject retrieval, Trove itself does not use controlled vocabularies to index items.The reason for this is that the records in Trove are actually contributed by many organizations, not indexed by Trove. Here is the architecture diagram that shows many of the different organizations contributing to Trove.
  • Each organization already has their records indexed using a particular controlled vocabulary, *start clicking to show second diagram* and therefore the records each have their own particular format. *go through the various controlled vocabularies and thesauri- EAC-CPF=Encoded Archival Context for Corporate Bodies, Persons, and FamiliesNLA ANDB = National Library of Australia’s Australian National Bibliographic DatabaseAPAIS = Australian Public Affairs and Information Service** Just like the previous diagram, this diagram only depicts some of the major contributors to Trove, *click for small circles* but there are many.So we know that Trove’s records are already indexed in some format before coming into Trove.The question arises then…
  • How does Trove deal with all these formats to enable efficient subject retrieval?In other words, Trove would require something to standardize all these records.Well, Trove uses Unqualified Dublin Core schema, and Picture Australia Metadata Schema to gather all the metadata of the records contributed to the resource discovery system in a consistent way.I will talk more about Unqualified Dublin Core and Picture Australia Metadata Schema.
  • Unqualified Dublin Core is a metadata standard that consists of 15 elements.According to an article written by Peñalvo et.al, these elements can be classified according to three aspects, namely, content, intellectual property and application.*click* here are the elements themselves. Some elements are similar to what we see in RDA, for instance, creator could correspond to the statement of responsibility of the work, title, identifier, Publisher’s name…*click* Picture Australia Metadata Schema is used only for online images. This schema uses the Dublin Core elements, plus its own specific elements, namely thumbnail, viewcopy and location.Although Trove can display all these elements, in order for a record to be accepted into Trove, some mandatory fields are required. *click*- circled in red on the slide.Therefore all the records, irrespective of their formats, need to have at least a title, type and an identifier in order to be used in Trove. And for resources containing online images, or online images themselves, they will also require a thumbnail and a location.
  • Now why is Dublin Core being used, and not some other metadata standard?An article written by Peñalvoet al. identified the benefits of using Dublin core for information integration. The authors had used the Qualified version of Dublin Core in the development of GREDOS, a digital institutional repository of the University of Salamanca in Spain. In general, the reasons for using Dublin Core are*click* Ease of creation and maintenance- basically Dublin Core was intended to be as simple and accessible as possible, so that any unspecialized person would be able to create descriptive records for online resources easily and efficiently. According to them, it also provides optimal retrieval in an online context.*click* Terminology is understandable*click* Scope is international – the specifications for Dublin Core were established with the participation of representatives from all over the world*click* Extendibility – Dublin Core can be used as a basis for descriptive information, therefore additional elements can be added for dealing with specific disciplines or subjects. This was seen with the Picture Australia Metadata Schema which contained a few elements in addition to the Dublin Core elements.With all these records standardized using Dublin Core, resource discovery is made easier despite the differences in format of the contributed records.Now I will turn it over to Patrick who will provide you with a tutorial of Trove.
  • Thank you [Arouce] …As my colleague just mentioned, Trove is an innovative platform that incorporates metadata on various types of records from many hundreds of cultural heritage institutions across the Asia-Pacific Region and, in fact, the World.I will now guide you through the key features of the system – with special emphasis on subject retrieval.What you see here is Trove’s main page in its entirety. The page itself is cleverly laid out in that all the major functions of the site are clearly visible – there is no need to click around or scroll up and down to get a full overview:Here (1) we have links to the main help / tutorial functions available to guide the new user – I won’t say much more on that subject, except to point out that some help features are usefully front and centreDown here (2) we have an area which highlights each of the broad zones used by Trove to group like records. In this area (3) we have the standard search box, which also directs users to more advanced options,Finally, the page features a login/sign up area (4), as well as a list of links (5) describing the many ways in which users are invited and encouraged to contribute to the resource description and subject retrieval process.During the next few minutes, I will introduce you to each of these elements, starting with the ZONES.One way for users to approach the site is by first exploring the 10 zones mentioned by Sherin. Selecting one …
  • … will give a very brief overview of what the category represents, as well as some featured items -- as you see here. What is more interesting for our purposes is that there are also links to institutions that hold similar records which may not be described in Trove.Now, going back to the main Trove site…
  • One of the most obvious features is the main search box. By default, a keyword search from this box will query all 330,000,000 resources described in Trove and will return results grouped on the basis of the 10 categories or “collection views” / “zones” which the NLA created based on user feedback. There are more advanced search options, which I will get into later, but for now I will just point out that users can easily choose to limit their searches here to records that are “online”, “Australian” and / or available at their own preselected libraries.One thing I did notice at this point …
  • … was that though the early literature on Trove (Holley, 2010, “Trove Features” section) indicated that the system would offer help with search terms, I could find no evidence of it myself. As we see here, when I start typing in WorldCat, that system offers suggestions (presumably based either on previous searches or on the underlying controlled vocabulary or thesaurus), Trove does not.
  • In any event, once I input my search terms I am brought to a results page. Here you see the results of my search for that iconic sort-of Australian, Captain James Cook. As already mentioned, the results are grouped by “zones”, most of which pertain to medium or record type. If you are only interested in “books”, you can enlarge that section so that other mediums aren’t showing. Alternatively, you can select one view, which brings it front and centre while moving and reducing the size of the others.  The way things are displayed varies somewhat between views, to reflect the unique characteristics of each medium. For instance, the base view of the “pictures” category just shows the image. That being said, there are some display elements common to most categories: A visual representation of the relevancy rankWhere it is available (preference to online)An image when available (cover art, a picture, etc.)A subset of relevant metadata about the record to help with identifying. For instance title, author, date, format and keywords -- though, interestingly, keywords are not clickable at this level. If you so choose, you can refine your search by selecting from the facets on the left. This is useful in that if you choose, for instance, “book format” as your preference, all the collection views remain, but non-book items are removed. This can highlight things like audio books classed under “Music, Sound and Video”.
  • From a subject retrieval perspective, however, it is interesting to note that the available facets tend to focus on physical rather than intellectual divisions. This can be illustrated by comparing the main facets in WorldCat and Trove As you can see, Trove does not include topic / subject or author facets. So, if you are interested in records having to do with the Paul Hogan who is an expert on the “Assessment Of Microwave Denture Processing By Temperature Measurement”, it could be hard to find amongst the records having to do with Crocodile Dundee.
  • While I don’t have time to delve into it in detail, it should be noted that there are some differences in the way records are treated in each category view. The information needed to describe an archived website is, necessarily, different from that for a book. I will allude to some of these differences later, but for now let’s look at book results are treated as these include some common retrieval features.  The first thing to note is that Trove takes a “FRBR-like” approach to grouping records (Holley, 2011, Section 3.3). Rather than listing all items matching your search terms separately, it groups all the different editions and versions of the same book, map, etc. under one “work” entry (Cathro & Collier, 2010, p. 9) -- a work being defined in FRBR as “a distinct intellectual or artistic creation” (IFLA, 1998, p. 13). So in this case, there are 9 versions of “The explorations of Captain James Cook” by A. Price,, but there is only one entry for it. Interestingly, and this is something I had never seen before, if a registered user feels that a version has been linked to the wrong work, they can move it themselves.NEXT [slide for book entry with just one version]
  • After you have clicked on a work (in this case with just one version), you are taken to a page showing the full description recording attributes such as title, creator, carrier, date, target audience, classification number, etc. etc., as well as clickable subjects. Among the useful features of this display are: [HIGHLIGHTS OF TEXT ON SLIDE] A permanent bookmark URL for every recordProminent “Get this edition” button which directs you either to the online location (together with a guess as to what access restrictions are in place), or where to borrow the edition (tries to link to item record in catalogue), or where to buy (links to booksellers, etc.)Copyright status (books)Citation references in APA, MLA, Harvard/Australian and Wikipedia formatsTags, lists and comments by others (not shown).Ability to export to del.icio.us, Digg, Twitter, Facebook and Connotea. The process is the same if there is more than one version, but there is an intermediate page which shows each of the available versions.  
  • Going back to search results page, you can browse within each of the views to locate relevant records, but again you are limited in how you narrow down your results by the available facets. You can also sort the results lists, but only by relevance or year.
  • Alternatively, you could always undertake an advanced search from the outset. The advanced search windows (because they are somewhat different depending on the category of interest) generally allow you to search by keyword, title, creator, subject, ISBN/ISSN or public tag. You can also pre-refine your search on the basis of various optional search limiters, which consistlargely of the same physical facets used to refine a search after the fact. That being said, some of the zones have their own specific limiters, as shown HERE.
  • Even more relevant for those aiming to search for information in context is the “People and organisations” zone, which differs from others in that it does not deal with a particular type of record. Instead, it seeks to create “identity records” which “provide users with a view of all gathered biographical information, associated persons and organisations, and linked resources in a single place along with links through to the resources created and maintained by our contributors” (NLA, n.d., “About people and organisations”). So in this example for Captain James Cook, we see that his biography, related people, and resources by or about him.
  • Thus far we have been talking mostly about what Trove does as a search engine. As Sherin explained, however, the interactive human element is also central to Trove’s approach to subject retrieval.These include:newspaper text correctionstagscommentsListsAll of which can be searched… and all of which contribute additional information and context not found in the source catalogsRUN THROUGH FOLLOWING SLIDES TO FINISH
  • Users contribute their time to correct computer transcriptions of historic newspapers. These transcriptions are then used as part of full-text searching.
  • Users can add tags (either private or public) to any item in Trove, and these can be searched like any other metadata (NLA, n.d., “Help on participating in Trove”).
  • Unlike tags, which are keywords or labels, comments allow users to make longer-form annotations. These can be reviews, additional information, corrections, etc. (NLA, n.d., “Help on participating in Trove”).
  • And finally we have lists, which is essentially a social curation element. As stated by the NLA, “Lists allow you to collect things you think belong together. You may want to do this to help organise your own work, your own favourite resources, or because you think the list will be useful to others” (NLA, n.d., “Lists”).
  • Hello, I’m going to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Trove.I felt the best way to share this information was to organize it into two categories which are important to Troveaccess to information and user experienceThere is a lot to love about Trove and it was honestly challenging to find many weaknesses. In fact, for most of the weaknesses we found, there was an explanation or perhaps a benefit to the user or organization.
  • I’m going to begin by discussing strengths and weaknesses related to access to information.Strengths:Resources from 1000 Australian libraries, museums, galleries, government agencies and other creators of Australian contentAccess to 2 million complete books online and to millions of other non-book resources, like photos, videos, digitized newspapers, magazines, maps, archived websites, and more.Content is domain-specific – clear scopeRobust contentCould link to other National equivalents, internationallyMeets the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines of Vision AustraliaUse of persistent identifiersTrove offers relevanceranking (unlike Google), which helps reveal resources from the “deep web”Takes content from the actual source, rather than a site about it (like Google produces some searches)Trove is transparent about how they are building the system; they also offer an API, so that other websites can incorporate Trove on their site
  • Weaknesses:The source of the information is not always clearRelationships between topics are not always linkedBroader vs. narrower is not shownPeople and organizations provide contextLimited facets for narrowing search by subject – more by form
  • As I mentioned earlier, we only found a couple of weaknesses related to the user experience. These perceived weaknesses are also somewhat subjective to a specific users experience.Therefore it made the most sense to present the strengths and weaknesses together.Strengths & Weaknesses:Supports a variety of user needs and approaches to research Browse for contentSearching or looking for specific resourcesThenfinding the resource online, from a library, or a bookstoreInteractive design and features - Interactive design gives users the opportunity to:Correct or improve contentTag contentConnect with other users who have shared interestsCreate lists to organize items users have looked at, then share them with othersUsers can request that Trove notify them when new content is available on theirsearch termOngoing updates to interface as well as ongoing updates to content (done in part by users)Positive because it is responding to user needsNegative because it can also cause confusionThe benefits to being a registered user are few – they receive almost all of the same benefits as non-registered users—except:RecognitionUsers can filter or limit how to access resources by their location
  • In conclusion, we were all very impressed with Trove—especially how it applies library principles and practices and brings these principles to users, helping them to access and engage with this information.Thank you for your time.Do you have any questions or comments?

Transcript

  • 1. TROVE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA ISI 5121 – Subject Analysis of Information Sherin Emmanuel, Patrick McLean, Kelly Sirett & Arouce Wasty
  • 2. WHAT IS TROVE? • Trove is a discovery experience focused on Australia and Australians. It supplements what search engines provide. • Launched in 2009 • If you are researching in the fields of the social sciences, literature, local or family history, or need inspiration for your school assignment, then this is the tool for you. • Example • if researching images relating to Edmund Barton, Australia‟s first Prime Minister, results will include descriptions such as people, book, manuscript, map and newspaper articles where the images appear. • A researcher searching for information on Nellie Melba will be presented with a range of results including biographies, pictures, music, newspapers, books etc. What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 3. THE DRIVERS FOR DEVELOPING TROVE Trove was designed to: • provide a single point of access to the resources of the deep web • facilitate access to a significantly greater range of resources from major sources, including selected digitized material freely available online • support searching of, and access to, full-text content • enhance ease of discovery by providing improved relevance ranking, refinement by facets, grouping of all editions of the same book (this is known as FRBR-like grouping) and exploitation of thesauri • engage with communities and individuals through annotation services • ensure that relevant information is not missed in a search by reducing the need to search material-specific discovery services separately • provide a platform for niche services to query a vast resource of Australian metadata and adapt if for their own needs. What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 4. FOCUS ON THE USER • It is an interactive site which encourages user input and user interaction via • Comments • Newspaper text corrections • Social tagging • Reorganizing of content • Metadata extraction and input • On 19 April 2012 Trove received a Statement of Accessibility from Vision Australia which verifies that Trove meets the level of conformance against the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 5. TROVE STATISTICS 329,264, 599 Australian and online resources: books, images, historic newspapers, maps, music, archives and more 86,167 Registered Users on 3 Mar 2013 65, 079 newspaper text corrections on 7 Mar 2013 88,547,328 total on 3 Mar 2013 2,012 images form users this month 929 lists this month 14, 402 items tagged this week 1,949,358 total on 3 Mar 2013 1,658 comments added this month 52,478 total on 3 Mar 2013 160 works merged or split this month 3,292 total on 3 Mar 2013 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 6. Zone TYPES OF Work Count RESOURCES Journals, articles and research 145,002,241 Books 17,523,987 Maps 524,668 Diaries, letters, archives 544,814 Lists 33,894 Music, sound and video 2,713,908 Digitised Newspapers and more 83,511,259 People and organization 915,908 Pictures, photos, objects 7,182,823 Archived websites (1996 - now) 71,344,991 Total 329,298,493 Trove calls them Collection views, Categories or Zones What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 7. TYPES OF RESOURCES AND THEIR Zone Facets FACETS Journals, articles and research Articles, periodicals, dataset, reviews Books Braille, Illustrated, Large Print, audio books Maps Aerial, atlas, electronic Diaries, letters, archives Published, Un Published Lists Decade, subject Music, sound and video Interview, lecture, recorded music, audio books Digitised Newspapers and more The Sydney Morning Herald, Daily News People and organisations Biographies, Occupation, Date of Birth, Pictures, photos, objects refined by Format, Availability, Decade Photos, Posters, Art work, objects Almost all can be etc…. Archived websites (1996 Keywords: Australia, Arts, Politics now) Strengths & Indexing What is Trove languages Tutorial weaknesses Conclusion
  • 8. Indexing Languages Natural language indexing Full text indexing Free text indexing Social tagging What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 9. System Architecture “Trove System Architecture Diagram”, Retrieved February 26, 2013 from http://www.nla.gov.au/trove/marketing/Trove%20architecture%20diagram.pdf. What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 10. Indexing Languages – Controlled Vocabularies Trove Architecture Diagram Pictures Australia Australian Picture Thesaurus NLA ANDB LCSH Dewey MARC Trove People Australia EAC-CPF PANDORA Web Archive Full text indexing APAIS Thesaurus What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 11. How Unqualified Dublin Core does Trove Picture Australia Metadata deal Schema with this? From: www.empowernetwork.com What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 12. Indexing Languages Unqualified Dublin Core - 15 Elements which can be classified according to three aspects Content • • • • • • • Intellectual Property • • • • Title Subject Description Source Type Relation Coverage Application • • • • Creator Publisher Contributor Rights Date Format Identifier Language Picture Australia Metadata Schema - For online images or resources with online images - Additional elements: thumbnail, viewcopy and location What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 13. Indexing Languages Why Dublin Core? • Ease of creation and maintenance • Terminology is understandable • Scope is international • Extendibility (Peñalvo et al., 2010) What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 14. Main Page 4 1 3 2 5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/?q=cook, james What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 15. “Zone” Overviews http://trove.nla.gov.au/collection?q= What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 16. Simple Search http://trove.nla.gov.au/?q=cook, james What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 17. Simple search interface – WorldCat vs. Trove WorldCat offers predictive text to suggest search subjects… http://www.worldcat.org/ … Trove does not. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 18. Search Results http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?q=cook%2C+james What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 19. Options for Refining Results FACETS IN WORLDCAT FACETS IN TROVE • Format (article, book, website, etc.) • Availability (access conditions) • Decade • Language • Australian Content • “Selected Subject View” (Performing arts or Music) What is Trove • • • • • • • Indexing languages Format (article, book, video, etc.) Author Year Language Content (biography, fiction, etc.) Audience (Juvenile, etc.) Topic (i.e. subject) Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 20. Search Results http://trove.nla.gov.au/book/result?q=cook+%28james%29 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 21. • Detailed Search AResults permanent URL for every record • Prominent “Get this edition” button • Copyright status (books) • Citation references • Tags, lists and comments by others. http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/34105185?q=cook%2C+james&c=book&versionId=44660670 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial • Export to social Strengths & media Conclusion weaknesses
  • 22. Search Results http://trove.nla.gov.au/book/result?q=cook+%28james%29 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 23. Advanced Search ZONE-SPECIFIC LIMITERS • Journals, articles & data sets: Audience, database • Digitized newspapers: Title of paper, article category, illustrated, word count • Maps: Scale • Archived websites: Keywords, site type •Diaries, letters, archives: Occupation • People & Organizations: DoB, DoD http://trove.nla.gov.au/?q&adv=y What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 24. People & Organisations Zone http://trove.nla.gov.au/people/1478026?q=cook%2C+james&c=people What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 25. Interactive elements http://trove.nla.gov.au/?q= What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 26. Newspaper Text Corrections http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/correction/82024841 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 27. Tags http://trove.nla.gov.au/tag# What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 28. Comments http://trove.nla.gov.au/recentComments?lastDays=31 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 29. Lists http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=9879 What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 30. Strengths & Weaknesses User Experience Access to Information What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 31. Access to Information Strengths • Resources from 1000 Australian libraries, museums, galleries and more • Access to resources online • Content is domain specific – clear scope • Accessible • Use of persistent identifiers • Relevance ranking (unlike Google) • Uncovers resources from „deep web‟ • Pulls content from the actual source (unlike Google) • Transparent What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 32. Access to Information Weaknesses • The source of the information is sometimes unclear • Relationships between topics are not always linked • Limited facets for narrowing search by subject What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 33. User Experience Strengths & Weaknesses • • • • Supports a variety of user needs and approaches to research Interactive design and features Ongoing updates to interface & content Registered user experience What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 34. Thank you Questions or comments? What is Trove Indexing languages Tutorial Strengths & weaknesses Conclusion
  • 35. Bibliography About the APAIS Thesaurus. (n.d.). APAIS Thesaurus. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://www.nla.gov.au/apais/thesaurus/about.html About APT. (2000). APT - Australian Pictorial Thesaurus. Retrieved from http://www.picturethesaurus.gov.au/about.html Appendix 1: Trove architecture overview. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.nla.gov.au/trove/marketing/Trove%20architecture%20diagram.pdf. Campbell, D. (2012). Trove‟s Application Programming Interface [PowerPoint presentation], presented in the Electronic Resources Australia Annual Forum, 10 July 2012. Cathro, W. and Collier, S. (2010). Developing Trove: the policy and technical challenges. Retrieved from http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/more-about-trove/ Controlled vocabulary. (2013, February 27). In Wikipedia. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controlled_vocabulary#Indexing_languages
  • 36. Bibliography Holley, R. (2010). Trove: Innovation is access to information in Australia. Ariadne, 64. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley Holley, R. (2011). Extending the scope of Trove: Addition of E-resources subscribed to by Australian libraries. D-Lib Magazine, 17 (11/12). doi:10.1045/november2011-holley. Holley, R. (2011b). Resource sharing in Australia: Find and get in Trove making “getting” better. D-Lib Magazine, 17 (3/4). doi: 10.1045/march2011holley. IFLA Study Group on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records. (1998). Functional requirements for bibliographic records. Munchen, Germany: K. G. Saur. Retrieved from http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/cataloguing/frbr/frbr_ 2008.pdf National Library of Australia. (n.d.-a). Trove [home page]. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/
  • 37. Bibliography National Library of Australia. (n.d.-c). Current work counts by zone. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/system/counts National Library of Australia. (n.d.-d). Help on finding things. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/help-on-finding-things/ National Library of Australia. (n.d.-e). Help on participating in Trove. Retrieved March 2, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/help-on-participating-introve National Library of Australia. (n.d.-f). Lists. Retrieved March 2, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?q= National Library of Australia. (n.d.-g). More about Trove. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/more-about-trove/ National Library of Australia. (n.d.-h). Technical specification for contributing. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/technicalspecs/
  • 38. Bibliography National Library of Australia. (n.d.-i). Trove Stats for environment: prod. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/system/stats National Library of Australia, PANDORA Web Archive. (2011, June 10). PANDORA overview. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://pandora.nla.gov.au/overview.html Peñalvo, F.J.G., Vega, J.A.M., Fernández, T.F., Peña, A.C., Aso, L.A., and Díaz, Ma L.A. (2010). Qualified Dublin Core Metadata Best Practices for GREDOS. Journal of Library Metadata, 10, 13-36.