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Social Design

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I conduct a workshop on Social Design & Design for Social Design at Design and Business Schools. This one was conducted at the India campus of Lécole de design Nantes Atlantique, in Bangalore, with …

I conduct a workshop on Social Design & Design for Social Design at Design and Business Schools. This one was conducted at the India campus of Lécole de design Nantes Atlantique, in Bangalore, with the students of the Transcultural Design class.

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  • 1. SOCIAL DESIGNKshitizANAND @kshitizDesign for the other 90%
  • 2. 90% of a designer’s time is spent on the richest 10% - Paul Polak
  • 3. CAN DESIGNERSCHANGE (IMPROVE)THE WORLD?
  • 4. Yes itcan!Design is forthe elite only!
  • 5. Design has become the most powerful tool with whichman shapes his tools and environments (and, byextension, society and himself) - Victor J Papanek, Design for the Real world
  • 6. WHAT IS COMMON?
  • 7. WHAT ISSOCIALDESIGN
  • 8. The foremost intent of social design is the satisfactionof human needs. The broad objective of social designis to improve ‘social quality’. It is about designing new functioning to elevateindividual and community capability and proposesolutions that genuinely empower and extend thecapability of the user. - Alastair Fuad-Luke on Social Design, in book ‘Design Activism: Beautifulstrangeness for a sustainable world’
  • 9. DESIGN forWANTDESIGN forNEED
  • 10. THE NEED?
  • 11. UN MillenniumDEVELOPMENT GOALShp://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/  
  • 12. WHAT AM I TALKINGABOUT ?2.2 million peopleglobally each year diedue to _______?
  • 13. WHAT AM I TALKINGABOUT ?2.2 million peopleglobally each year diedue to Diarrhoeahp://www.who.int/water_sanita6on_health/diseases/diarrhoea/en/  
  • 14. hp://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/  
  • 15. EVIDENCES?There  are  a  lot  of  individuals,  companies  working  on  this  now  and  they  span  across  sectors    
  • 16. hp://www.slideshare.net/kshi6z/design-­‐u-­‐turn-­‐from-­‐want-­‐to-­‐need  
  • 17. Human centered designIS AT THE HEART OFSOCIALDESIGN
  • 18. ARGUEHave ‘Design Thinking’ and‘Social Innovation’ becomepermanently intertwined?
  • 19. UNDERSTANDLIFEWORLDS- Edmund Husserl introduced the concept of the lifeworld in his ’Crisis of European Sciences’(1936)
  • 20. Lifeworld:(German Lebenswelt) hp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifeworld  A state of affairs in which the worldis experienced, the world is lived.A universe of what is self-evidentor given.Cannot be understood in a purelystatic manner as all things appearas themselves and meaningful.
  • 21. This collective inter-subjectivepool of perceiving, is bothuniversally present and, forhumanitys purposes, capable ofarriving at objective truth, or atleast as close to objectivity aspossible.Lifeworld:(German Lebenswelt)
  • 22. Researchperspectives
  • 23. 1.  Phenomenological2.  Epistemological3.  Sociological
  • 24. Phenomenological(- Husserl Schütz) - see the lifeworld to be the study of the structures ofsubjective experience and consciousness-  to understand that we each individualistic,“I-the-man” and all of us together, belong to theworld as living with one another in the world- the world is our world, valid for our consciousnessas existing precisely through this living together.’
  • 25. Phenomenological(- Husserl Schütz) - One has to place oneself in a context comprisedof the various others and the collective sharedexperience of individuals and objects.- It is therefore not about the individual ego of thedesigner; rather we, in living together, that weunderstand the world.WHAT IT MEANS
  • 26. Individual (subjective) understanding of the lifeworld  Lifeworld  
  • 27. Sociological(- Habermas) -  Viewpoint of an objective reality of the society,taking account the social and materialenvironmental conditions and their relevance-The view of the lifeworld is more or less thebackground environment of competences, practices,and attitudes representable in terms of onescognitive horizon-lifeworld as consisting of socially and culturallysedimented linguistic meanings
  • 28. Sociological(- Habermas) WHAT IT MEANS- the focus here thus is not on the consciousnessof the individual, but to understand the practicalrationality that is being governed by the rules ofthat system- Social coordination and systemic regulationoccur by means of shared practices, beliefs,values, superstitions, alternate and parallelgoverning bodies and structures
  • 29. Individual (subjective) understanding of the lifeworld  Rules ofgoverningPracticesBeliefsSuperstitionsAgreementsLifeworld  View from the rules of the systemTowards an objective realityOf that what is agreed upon andgoverned by and followed
  • 30. Epistemological- touches upon the notion of ‘life conditions’ as afurther reference point to understanding the socialspace.- life conditions include material and immaterial livingcircumstances as for example employment situation,availability of material resources, housing conditions,social environment (friends, foes, relatives, etc.) aswell as the persons physical condition.
  • 31. WHAT IT MEANS- It is entrusted on top of the lifeworld and theSocial and material environment conditions.Epistemological
  • 32. Individual (subjective)understanding of thelifeworld  Understanding the life conditions that are a result of therules and the individual’s positioning in the lifeworldViewing within andOf Life Conditions  Rules ofgoverningPracticesBeliefsSuperstitionsAgreementsLife conditions  
  • 33. BELIEVEIN WHAT YOU SEEIN WHAT YOU HEARIN WHAT YOU FEELINWHATYOUEXPERIENCE
  • 34. INSPIREIDEATEIMPLEMENT
  • 35. WICKEDPROBLEMS- Rittel Webber [ 1973] With social design you would run into Wicked Problems
  • 36. “Some problems are so complex that you have to be highly intelligent and well informed just to be undecided about them.” - Laurence J. Peter
  • 37. It is a class of social system problems, which are•  ill-formulated,•  the information is confusing,•  there are many clients and decision makers withconflicting values,•  the ramifications of the whole system arethoroughly confusing,•  it is messy, circular, and aggressive,extraordinarily difficult to categorize or define.CHARACTERISTICS
  • 38. DEFININGWICKED PROBLEMSIS IN ITSELF AWICKED PROBLEM
  • 39. ALLPROBLEMSAREOPPORTUNITIESIN DISGUISE
  • 40. Multiple starting points and often no clear end mark thecharacteristics of wicked problems as the solution areintermingled with another problem within the same socialspace and share a causal relation to each otherAnand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  • 41. COMMUNICATECOLLABORATECREATE
  • 42. RESEARCHAGENDA
  • 43. CONTEXT•  Understand contextproperly•  Talk to and studydifferent stakeholders
  • 44. IDENTIFY•  Large problem space•  Small problems in largeproblem space and howthey connect with eachother
  • 45. USER GROUPS•  Identify different usergroups•  Differentiate betweentarget group andaffected group
  • 46. Empathize•  Remember cultural rules•  Do not hurt sentiments
  • 47. ANALYSIS
  • 48. CREATE SOLUTIONSDo not make justsome noise
  • 49. CREATE SOLUTIONSBreak patterns set normsChange systems
  • 50. INCLUSIONDesign with (not for)to create change
  • 51. INCLUSIONDesign with inputand involvement ofbeneficiaries
  • 52. QUESTIONHow can things bebetter?
  • 53. MEASUREThe outcomes of thework done and notjust rely on Outputs
  • 54. hp://www.slideshare.net/CharlesGYF/six-­‐habits-­‐of-­‐social-­‐entrepreneurs  
  • 55. hp://www.slideshare.net/CharlesGYF/six-­‐habits-­‐of-­‐social-­‐entrepreneurs  
  • 56. IDEATION
  • 57. Product
  • 58. ProductinsystemAnand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  • 59. DCI:Divergence – Convergence - Integration  Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  • 60. System-ProductHarmonization  Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  • 61. Social Design process  Anand  K,  Haag  J;  “A  framework  for  teaching  Design  for  Social  Impact  ,  Feb  2013    
  • 62. MEASURINGIMPACT
  • 63. a) Short termb) Long term
  • 64. a) Tangibleb) Intangible
  • 65. THANKYOUEmail: kshitiz@happyhorizons.inTwitter: @kshitiz

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