Raising student’srecovered

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Raising student’srecovered

  1. 1. Welcome, please pick up a packet, some juice and snacks. We will start soon.
  2. 2. Pierce Middle School Parent Workshop Series #2 November 1, 2011 <ul><li>Organizational Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Karen Ruth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reading Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Beattie </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Brown </li></ul><ul><li>Homework Helps </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Heather Barlow </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Parent Workshop Series <ul><li>True success requires a full team! </li></ul><ul><li>School + Student + Caring Adult = </li></ul><ul><li>Student + Caring Adult + School = </li></ul><ul><li>Caring Adult + School + Student = </li></ul><ul><li>It does not matter the order </li></ul><ul><li>All three are needed to </li></ul><ul><li>Equal Success </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  4. 4. On the pink cards please <ul><li>What are the problems you have at home with your children’s organization? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the problems you think your child is having with organization at school? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Good News: Organization <ul><li>Saves time </li></ul><ul><li>Keeps clutter to a minimum </li></ul><ul><li>Is a life long habit </li></ul><ul><li>Prepares your child to be on his/ her own at college. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces lost and never found </li></ul>
  6. 6. Bad News: Organization <ul><li>Takes time </li></ul><ul><li>Will not happen over night </li></ul><ul><li>Requires repetition </li></ul><ul><li>Will take 21 times to become a habit </li></ul><ul><li>Will need to be revisited until the event becomes a HABIT </li></ul>
  7. 7. Questions and suggestions there are no quick answers <ul><li>Organization tips for home </li></ul><ul><li>Organization tips for locker </li></ul><ul><li>Organization tips for the book bag </li></ul><ul><li>What you should plan on at Semester break? </li></ul><ul><li>What you should plan on at the end of the year? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Organization Video Clip http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/14923457/ns/today-today_home_and_garden/t/organize-your-student-these-tricks-tips/
  9. 9. The Big Dump <ul><li>Clear everything out </li></ul><ul><li>Sort </li></ul><ul><li>Put back only what is needed </li></ul>
  10. 10. Ruth’s Big Give Away!! <ul><li>Bags to organize </li></ul><ul><li>Creative tools to make with your kids </li></ul><ul><li>Time and organizational savers </li></ul><ul><li>The biggest hint wins a prize! </li></ul>
  11. 11. How to Organize your locker http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3S5JBt3zvLU&feature=related <ul><li>http://www.ehow.com/video_5538748_organize-school-locker.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBHzMlO8LEA&feature=related </li></ul><ul><li>Article http://www.wikihow.com/Organize-Your-Locker </li></ul>
  12. 12. How to organize your binder and notes <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igDbkrmDouw&feature=relmfu </li></ul>
  13. 13. Monitor the kind of television programs and movies your kids watch. Reduce your child’s exposure to violent models. Be An Organized Parent Be organized and plan ahead to be an effective parent. Anticipate your child’s needs before his bad behavior forces you to meet his needs. When you allow your child’s bad behavior to force you to meet his needs, you unintentionally reward that bad behavior. HOUSEHOLD CONFUSION &quot;Listen, Julie, I'm going to have to get off the phone. The kids are starting to get wild!&quot; Sometimes the entire family situation becomes disorganized. Often, in such a situation, the misbehavior of children rapidly increases. Reorganize the situation as quickly as you can. Being an effective parent takes not only love and discipline, but a lot of time and planning. If you are shopping with your children, return home before they are completely exhausted. If your children begin to fuss with each other during religious services, don’t scold or threaten.
  14. 14. Reading Questions from Parents <ul><li>please write on the 3” x 5” blue cards. </li></ul><ul><li>submit any questions you have about reading at the middle school level </li></ul>
  15. 15. Quick break
  16. 16. Bad News: Reading <ul><li>Old habits never die but some fade away with help. </li></ul><ul><li>It will take time to develop new habits. </li></ul><ul><li>Will take 21+ tries (7x3) </li></ul><ul><li>Will stay the same without intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Poor habits can cause death. Ask about Mrs. Ruth’s true story. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Strategies to Help your child with Reading Pierce Staff Members
  18. 18. Good News: Reading <ul><li>Will improve when habits improve </li></ul><ul><li>Will improve with adult intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Will result in more open communication </li></ul>
  19. 19. Strategy: Build Good Habits Which describes your child? <ul><li>Book is open </li></ul><ul><li>Eyes are open </li></ul><ul><li>Student writes down unknown word & notes from the sections. </li></ul><ul><li>Reads where you can see them. </li></ul><ul><li>You can skim a page ask them to reread and tell you what the sentence, paragraph or chapter is about. </li></ul><ul><li>Book pages flop closed </li></ul><ul><li>Eyes are shut and head is on the table </li></ul><ul><li>Says “I read at school” repeatedly </li></ul><ul><li>Goes to room and shuts the door </li></ul><ul><li>Argues “ It is too boring” “I don’t like it.” “It isn’t at my level” </li></ul>
  20. 20. If your child was in the first column go get a drink and relax. If you see the second column as your child, take notes : <ul><li>Open book, head up, sit at the table, read, take notes. </li></ul><ul><li>Set a timer for 15 minutes say “I will test you on words, characters and events in 15 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>Answer: “Life is boring most of the time. Welcome to reality.” </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, Repeat, </li></ul>
  21. 21. Raising Student’s READING LEVELS Mrs. Nancy Beattie
  22. 22. In order for your child to read at a higher level , two things are essential: 1. Read each day 2. Build vocabulary Sight words Decoding words Using helps
  23. 23. READ EACH DAY <ul><li>Just as we practice shooting baskets and find we get better the more time we put in, we must practice reading in order to get better. Moving our eyes across text (words) is absolutely essential if we want to become fluent readers. Reading all types of text will help. </li></ul>
  24. 24. READ EACH DAY <ul><li>Following a recipe to make something </li></ul><ul><li>Following directions to do an assignment accurately </li></ul><ul><li>Reading novels, biographies and A/R books </li></ul><ul><li>Yahoo “news” (celebrity gossip, world news, informational pieces) </li></ul><ul><li>Sports updates </li></ul><ul><li>Magazine articles </li></ul>
  25. 25. Hint: You can tell if your child is not reading fluently if <ul><li>she/he is reading word by word. </li></ul><ul><li>sentences sound ‘choppy’. </li></ul><ul><li>there are long pauses with word substitutions. </li></ul>
  26. 26. BUILDING VOCABULARY SIGHT WORDS <ul><li>A sight word is a word we know immediately. We don’t have to sound it out. The minute we see letters put in a certain order, we know the word. </li></ul><ul><li>When our eyes are able to read over words easily, this is because the words are SIGHT WORDS to us. When reading sight words, we don’t struggle with the text. We can read smoothly, quickly, and fluently. </li></ul>
  27. 27. BUILDING VOCABULARY DECODE <ul><li>STOP SKIPPING OVER UNKNOWN WORDS </li></ul><ul><li>It is natural for most people (adult, too!) to skip over words we don’t know. By doing this, we are passing up a chance to build vocabulary. Without learning new words, students will be stuck at the same reading level. It will never benefit anyone to skip over an unknown word. </li></ul>
  28. 28. BUILDING VOCABULARY DECODE <ul><li>Separate the word into little chunks in order to sound it out </li></ul><ul><li>See if any part of the word looks familiar (EX: habit ually—the first 5 letters are habit) </li></ul><ul><li>Use context clues to try and figure out what an unknown word might mean. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask someone. </li></ul><ul><li>Look up the word in the dictionary or on-line to get its meaning </li></ul>
  29. 29. BUILDING VOCABULARY Decode Words Learn word roots, and affixes they pop up in words all the time and will give you a hint to the word’s meaning.
  30. 30. Learn the meanings of root words. <ul><li>Roots </li></ul><ul><li>ab—away from ( ab sent, ab stract, ab duct, ab andon) </li></ul><ul><li>vis—to see ( vis it, vis or, vis ion, vis ionary) </li></ul><ul><li>dict—to say or tell (dictator, diction, dictionary, verdict) </li></ul>
  31. 31. Affixes are added to the base or root word such as suffixes & prefixes. <ul><li>Suffixes are at the end </li></ul><ul><li>or- person who (visit or ,dictat or ,abductor) </li></ul><ul><li>Prefixes are at the beginning </li></ul><ul><li>re- again </li></ul><ul><li>( re visit) </li></ul>
  32. 32. Questions? <ul><li>3x5 cards parents submitted. </li></ul><ul><li>General reading questions </li></ul>
  33. 33. That takes us to:
  34. 34. At Pierce we have a Reading Apprentice teacher who works with our classroom teachers as they work with reading in the classrooms <ul><li>Mrs. Susan Brown shares her </li></ul><ul><li>refrigerator magnet ideas. </li></ul>
  35. 36. “ Say Something” Reading Strategy shared by Mr. Bill Triolet, Gr. 8 Teacher PMS <ul><li>2 readers </li></ul><ul><li>Same text </li></ul><ul><li>Alternately, each one says something about what they just read after each section of the page. </li></ul><ul><li>Only at the very end do you discuss the text, ask questions, notice vocabulary or find out if you both understood the information in the same way the information. </li></ul>
  36. 37. Reading Strategy Spot check in and -ing: Submitted by Mrs. Karen Schnuell-Ruth Spot check what your child is reading even if she/he is an excellent reader. Ask about a character named or what a word means in the sentence.
  37. 38. <ul><li>You can read the book at the same time your child is reading then have a good discussion about the book. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to research more information about the topic with your child (limit your excitement) </li></ul><ul><li>Pick out random words to be certain vocabulary in context is correct. </li></ul>
  38. 39. How many words per minute does your child read? <ul><li>Time them for one minute have them count the words they read. </li></ul><ul><li>235 = Gr.8 </li></ul><ul><li>215 = Gr. 7 </li></ul><ul><li>195 = Gr. 6 </li></ul><ul><li>This will be adjusted based on the difficulty of material, and some may read too fast and some too slow to comprehend what they read. </li></ul>
  39. 40. Reading Strategies Flag Kit use the colored tabs provided to mark your book <ul><li>Green Connect with the Text </li></ul><ul><li>(something you have read, something in your life, something in your world) </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow Question the Text </li></ul><ul><li>(mark where what you have just read makes you wonder about something) </li></ul><ul><li>Blue Infer/Predict </li></ul><ul><li>(mark where you have used the author’s clues to figure something out or to predict what might happen next) </li></ul><ul><li>Orange Monitor for Meaning & Clarify </li></ul><ul><li>(mark where you have stopped to figure out a word or have gone back to something you have read) </li></ul><ul><li>Purple Evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>(mark where you have formed an opinion bout the story or characters) </li></ul><ul><li>Red Author’s Craft </li></ul><ul><li>(mark where the author has used language in a special way and helped you visualize a clear picture in your mind) </li></ul>
  40. 41. What has worked with you? <ul><li>http://blogs.trb.com/features/family/parenting/blog/2009/09/how_to_tell_youre_enabling_you.html </li></ul><ul><li>What is the difference between enabling vs helping? </li></ul>
  41. 42. Organization: Homework Tips <ul><li>Mrs. Barlow Pierce Counselor </li></ul>http://www.4-adhd.com/article4.html
  42. 43. Homework tips <ul><li>Help your child learn to prioritize most important assignments and projects according to due date, amount of points possible, most difficult class, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Post a monthly calendar near the “homework spot” to help your child see upcoming due dates and deadlines. Some students find it helpful to set personal goals/deadlines with long-term projects to keep them on track. </li></ul><ul><li>With your child, develop a checklist of everything that needs to be ready for the next school day to avoid the last-minute rush in the morning (ie: have planner signed, put materials in backpack, pack lunch, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>If your child has difficulty remembering to bring study materials (planner, text books, etc.) home each day, post a checklist in their locker as a visual reminder. </li></ul><ul><li>Use rewards! If your child struggles with motivation, offer incentives such as computer/TV/phone privileges AFTER homework is completed. </li></ul><ul><li>Stay nearby while your student completes homework or studies. Not only will your presence help your child stay on track, but they will be more likely to seek your assistance if you make yourself available. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep “cheat sheets” on hand for reference. For example, a multiplication table, math formulas, or other reference charts can help a student attain higher accuracy during study time. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to eliminate all external distractions during study time. TV’s, cell phones and other electronics should be turned off. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have questions or need additional resources, please call your child’s school counselor (Mrs. Macey A-K or Mrs. Barlow L-Z) at 313-937-8880. </li></ul>
  43. 44. <ul><li>Set a nightly schedule —and stick to it. Studying and completing homework will happen much easier if there is a set schedule for the student to follow daily. Many kids need some downtime after school, so consider setting a start time approximately 45-60 minutes after your child gets home. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate studying/review time into the daily homework routine. Studying math facts, vocabulary words, lecture notes or reading a book for a short amount of time daily helps students retain information and develops good study habits. Students should NEVER say they don’t have homework!! </li></ul><ul><li>Allow student to take 5-10 minute breaks throughout study time. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a distraction-free “homework spot” where your child consistently does their homework each night. Encourage them to keep materials needed for studying in this spot to eliminate the problem of lost or disorganized supplies. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep and file returned homework assignments, quizzes and study guides. Use these to study for unit/chapter tests and </li></ul>
  44. 45. <ul><li>Help your child develop a color-coded organizational system (ie: blue folders and notebooks=math, green folders and notebooks=science, etc.). Returned papers and study materials can also be filed using the same color folders at home. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure your child organizes his/her binder by filing papers in their appropriate folder each night. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggest finding a study buddy or developing a study group to help your child study for an upcoming test or exam. </li></ul><ul><li>Students have different styles of learning. When studying, consider how your child learns best. If s/he is a visual learner, have her/him make flashcards. Auditory learners can make a study guide by recording themselves and listening to the recording whenever possible. Kinesthetic learners can write information repeatedly for better retention. </li></ul><ul><li>Enforce the use of the student planner . Recording important due dates, deadlines and reminders is crucial to school success. </li></ul>
  45. 47. Help your child learn to prioritize most important assignments and projects according to due date, amount of points possible, most difficult class, etc. Post a monthly calendar near the “homework spot” to help your child see upcoming due dates and deadlines. Some students find it helpful to set personal goals/deadlines with long-term projects to keep them on track. With your child, develop a checklist of everything that needs to be ready for the next school day to avoid the last-minute rush in the morning (ie: have planner signed, put materials in backpack, pack lunch, etc.) If your child has difficulty remembering to bring study materials (planner, text books, etc.) home each day, post a checklist in their locker as a visual reminder. Use rewards! If your child struggles with motivation, offer incentives such as computer/TV/phone privileges AFTER homework is completed.
  46. 48. Packet Handouts with more information and suggestions were provided by: <ul><li>Heather Barlow </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Beattie </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Brown </li></ul><ul><li>Eddie Latour </li></ul><ul><li>Karen Schnuell-Ruth </li></ul>

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