Solar protection inbuildings using PARASOL(BEA software)                                 By                          ANIRU...
IntroductionParasol can produce the following results:Primary and total solar transmittance for the sunshade and the wind...
Comparison of two different window     structures and sun shades1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window and...
Comparison of two different window     structures and sun shades1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window and...
Comparison of two different window             structures1.Solar protection simulation using double pane window andawning ...
Comparison of two different window             structures1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window andawning ...
Window type:
External Sunshade: Awning
Interpane Sunshade: Venetian blind
Internal Sunshade: Pleated curtain
Solar Transmittance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade
Solar Transmittance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade
Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade (Energy required to keep the inlet air at 17 deg C)
Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade ( solar insolation with and without sunshade)
Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade ( heat and cold energy required with sunshade per day)
Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade (design days – peak load)
Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade (design days – outdoor temp)
Solar transmittance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Solar transmittance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
Conclusion:Solar protection in buildings is simulated for two differentwindow structures and arrived with the following co...
References:PARASOL V6.6 – Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US department of Energy.
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  • The orientation is important for calculation of transmittance propertiesWhen the orientation is 180 deg the ext. wall faces south.
  • g-value -- the sum of primary transmittance (T-value) and secondary transmittance. The secondary transmittance is the ratio between solar insolation and the part of the solar energy absorbed in the window/solar shade materials, which reaches the room through heat transport.  
  • T-value -- primary solar energy transmittance. The ratio between the transmitted insolation through the window/sunshade system and the insolation
  • 11 mn01.pptx

    1. 1. Solar protection inbuildings using PARASOL(BEA software) By ANIRUDH B ME Energy
    2. 2. IntroductionParasol can produce the following results:Primary and total solar transmittance for the sunshade and the window for each month during a year.Daily values of cooling and heating demand, and the maximum cooling and heating input over the year.Duration diagrams for indoor temperatures and cooling and heating load.Duration diagram for operative room temperatures.Daily values of primary transmitted solar radiation.Design days for heating and cooling.Monthly and annual values of energy use for pre-heating and pre-cooling of the inlet air.Monthly and annual values of electricity output when a sunshade of type PV screen is used.
    3. 3. Comparison of two different window structures and sun shades1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window andawning sunshade:Geometry of the room:
    4. 4. Comparison of two different window structures and sun shades1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window andawning sunshade:Window embrasure andframe:
    5. 5. Comparison of two different window structures1.Solar protection simulation using double pane window andawning sunshade:Site and orientation:
    6. 6. Comparison of two different window structures1.Solar protection simulation using single pane window andawning sunshade:Walls construction:
    7. 7. Window type:
    8. 8. External Sunshade: Awning
    9. 9. Interpane Sunshade: Venetian blind
    10. 10. Internal Sunshade: Pleated curtain
    11. 11. Solar Transmittance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade
    12. 12. Solar Transmittance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade
    13. 13. Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade (Energy required to keep the inlet air at 17 deg C)
    14. 14. Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade ( solar insolation with and without sunshade)
    15. 15. Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window with awningsunshade ( heat and cold energy required with sunshade per day)
    16. 16. Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade (design days – peak load)
    17. 17. Energy Balance Simulation: Double pane window withawning sunshade (design days – outdoor temp)
    18. 18. Solar transmittance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    19. 19. Solar transmittance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    20. 20. Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    21. 21. Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    22. 22. Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    23. 23. Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    24. 24. Energy balance Simulation: Triple pane window withawning sunshade
    25. 25. Conclusion:Solar protection in buildings is simulated for two differentwindow structures and arrived with the following conclusion:The maximum cooling and heating load decreases by 9W and 36W when triple pane window is used.Therefore the cooling and heating demand also decreases accordingly.The usage of sunshades during summer conditions is a must since it reduces the energy usage by nearly 45 -50% (in both window structures)The usage of sunshades during winter conditions must be avoided since it reduces energy usage by nearly 30% (in both window structures).
    26. 26. References:PARASOL V6.6 – Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US department of Energy.
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