DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION
PRESENTATION
MTE/533-Curriculum Constructs & Assessment: Science
and Mathematics
Professor Sha...
TEAM B DIFFERENTIATING PRESENTATION
AGENDA:
Define Differentiated Instruction
 Trends in differentiating instruction for ...
DIFFERENTIATION INSTRUCTION,
WHAT IS IT?

Differentiated Instruction is defined as
“teachers tailoring instruction to meet...
TRENDS OF DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
The Use of
Manipulatives
Manipulatives work in
both math and science
settings
Cubes
...
Flexible Grouping
Flexible grouping could be
used in both math and science
classrooms
Groups “re-teaches an idea or
skill ...
Instructional Issues with
Flexible Grouping
Intended for students to move to higher level, reality
is they remain fixed
 ...
Instructional Issues with Modifying
Environment


Teacher must be able to observe the classroom



Teacher must be able ...
Instructional Issues with Manipulatives
Teacher not knowing how to use correctly
 Need to be used regularly not as a last...
Instructional Issues with Tiered
Assessments


Requires highly qualified teachers



Requires teachers to have time to w...
Arizona Science Standard Concept 1: Structure of earth
PO1. Classify rocks and minerals by the following observable proper...
REFERENCES
Chen, J. J., & Weiland, L. (2007). Helping young
children learn mathematics: Strategies for meeting
the needs o...
REFERENCES
Guardino, C.A., Fullerton, E. (2010). Changing
Behaviors by Changing the Classroom
Environment. Teaching Except...
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  • Manipulatives- Manipulatives can provide more of an hands-on approach to learning. Students are able to use all of their senses to experience the activity. Teachers can provide manipulatives for various levels of learning and modify as needed to meet the needs of students. Tiered Assignments- “Tiered activities enable the teacher to create tasks that target students’ varying levels of readiness and thus allow for the appropriate level of challenge for the learners” (Dahlman, Hoffman, & Brauhn, 2008). Teachers can implement tiered activities at the emergent, grade-level, and advanced levels of readiness and most likely be able to have his or her students be engaged, practice current skills to meet current needs, and possibly extend their skills and knowledge to advance to the next level. “Differentiation instruction allows students to acquire the same concepts and skills but at different levels corresponding to their individual abilities” (Chen & Wailand, 2007).
  • Flexible Grouping- Allows students to work with each other and learn different skills and abilities from one another. Flexible groups are created based on the students academic needs and abilities to learn. These groups may change depending on how the student progresses and what their needs may be at the start and what they become as they continue to learn. “Flexible grouping focuses on applying flexibility to group and regroup children according to specific learning goals, activities, and needs” (Chen & Wailand, 2007). Learning Environment- Differentiating the learning environment allows teachers to meet the needs of various learners and help them excel in their learning. The adjustments made to the learning environment can meet each level of learning and encourage critical thinking skills at various levels, such as implementing Bloom’s Taxonomy. When providing several different ways to learn, the student feels as if they have control over their learning and are open to participating because their individual learning style and needs are being met.
  • TeamB+Differentiating+instruction+presentation

    1. 1. DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION PRESENTATION MTE/533-Curriculum Constructs & Assessment: Science and Mathematics Professor Sharon Stone Team B: Kristin Stokien, Jamie Devriese, & Kendra Lewis
    2. 2. TEAM B DIFFERENTIATING PRESENTATION AGENDA: Define Differentiated Instruction  Trends in differentiating instruction for math and science  Do these trends work in both math and science classrooms?  Instructional issues with using the identified trends for diverse learners  A lesson plan outline that implements one of the trends  Conclusion and Resources 
    3. 3. DIFFERENTIATION INSTRUCTION, WHAT IS IT? Differentiated Instruction is defined as “teachers tailoring instruction to meet individual needs” (Tomlinson, 2013). Every student is their own individual and are different in their culture, skill level, language, gender, and ability to learn. Not one student learns the same. With that being said, teachers need to accommodate the needs of each student and provide a variety of learning strategies, activities, content, and assessments.
    4. 4. TRENDS OF DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION The Use of Manipulatives Manipulatives work in both math and science settings Cubes Counters Money Rocks, sand, soil Skeletons and bones Planet models Tiered Assignments Tiered assignments allow students to learn the same objective, but at different levels of readiness.
    5. 5. Flexible Grouping Flexible grouping could be used in both math and science classrooms Groups “re-teaches an idea or skill for struggling learners, or to extends the thinking or skills of advanced learners” (Tomlinson, 2013). whole group teacher-led Small group Student-led small group, Dyad Individual Learning Environment Every class can be successful in differentiated instruction by modifying the learning environment Quiet spaces Seating arrangements Lighting Daily routine Group learning centers Décor and materials of various cultures and languages
    6. 6. Instructional Issues with Flexible Grouping Intended for students to move to higher level, reality is they remain fixed  Teachers not grouping effectively, requires assessment of strengths and weaknesses  Teacher must be able to select activities that most students can do without direct teacher support  Have time to provide direct support and additional instruction  Students must be prepared to work in groups  Teachers must have access to various texts at different levels but still connect conversation 
    7. 7. Instructional Issues with Modifying Environment  Teacher must be able to observe the classroom  Teacher must be able to modify the classroom properly to address issues  Teacher must ask: Are they consistent?  Are they correct?  Are they being used as intended?  Do they need changing? 
    8. 8. Instructional Issues with Manipulatives Teacher not knowing how to use correctly  Need to be used regularly not as a last resort  Teacher must use demonstrations not just place them on the desk  Make sure students can understand the concept and not using them in a rote manner  If not used properly students will not be able to solve problems at an abstract level  Not to be used as a motivational tool  Can distract from the learning process 
    9. 9. Instructional Issues with Tiered Assessments  Requires highly qualified teachers  Requires teachers to have time to work with small groups directly  Must be able to effectively assess students for fear of false positives
    10. 10. Arizona Science Standard Concept 1: Structure of earth PO1. Classify rocks and minerals by the following observable properties: grain, color, texture, and hardness.  Objectives: Students will be able to identify three types of rocks. Students will be able compare and contrast rocks and minerals. Students will be able to write the steps of the rock cycle.  • Rock cycle worksheet  Procedures: 1. Show students a wide variety of specimens of rocks and minerals. 2. Point out the difference in color, texture, grain, and hardness. 3. Pass out different rocks for each student to study closer. 4. Discuss where rocks are found. 5. Discuss the difference between rocks and minerals. 6. Show students the rock cycle using the SMART board presentation. 7. Show students examples of rocks and ask them to identify if they are metaphoric, sedimentary, or igneous. 8. Hand out rock cycle worksheet. 9. Have students work in groups of four to complete the worksheet.  Instructional Approach: In this lesson we will use cooperative learning. In this lesson we will use rocks as manipulatives.  Assessment: Students will show their understanding of the rock and mineral cycle by completing the rock cycle worksheet. The worksheet will be graded for accuracy. ROCKS AND MINERALS Materials: • Rock and mineral collections • SMART board presentation to show the rock cycle  SAMPLE LESSON PLAN: Rocks and Minerals GRADE: 7th CONTENT AREA: Science
    11. 11. REFERENCES Chen, J. J., & Weiland, L. (2007). Helping young children learn mathematics: Strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners. Exchange (01648527), (174), 46. Dahlman, A., Hoffman, P., & Brauhn, S. (2008). Classroom Strategies and Tools for Differentiating Instruction in the ESL Classroom. 25, 17. Retrieved from http://www.minnetesol.org Dickman, G.E. (2006). RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell. Retrieved from www.readingrockets.org.
    12. 12. REFERENCES Guardino, C.A., Fullerton, E. (2010). Changing Behaviors by Changing the Classroom Environment. Teaching Exceptional Children. 42(6). Tomlinson, C.A. (2013). What Is Differentiated Instruction?. Retrieved from http://readingrockets.org Van de Walle, J.A., Karp, K.S., Bay-Williams, J.M. (2010). Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally (7th ed.). Allyn & Bacon: Pearson Education.
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