Scholarship of Teaching  and Learning Situating  Aboriginal Studies &  critically appraising Nicholls (2004) Dr Kristyn Ha...
Introduction <ul><li>‘ The work of the professor [University lecturer] becomes consequential only as it is understood by o...
Structural outline <ul><li>Part one: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is Aboriginal Studies? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Situatin...
Origins of Aboriginal Studies <ul><li>Emerged as an anthropologically-based course at a Perth teachers’ college in the mid...
Aboriginal Studies: A dynamic field <ul><li>Changes over time in line with Government policy and federal/state/local polit...
Aboriginal Studies: A multi-disciplinary interchange
Aboriginal Studies & SOTL  <ul><li>SOTL literature on teaching Aboriginal Studies pertains to primary & secondary school c...
Aboriginal Studies & SOTL @ UTAS <ul><li>Current emphasis on implementing CRA </li></ul><ul><li>Driven by compliance with ...
Introducing Nicholls <ul><li>Professor Gill Nicholls </li></ul><ul><li>Currently Pro-Vice Chancellor, Academic, at Salford...
Nicholls: The research problem <ul><li>In the UK, the Institute for Learning and Teaching [ILT] exists to enhance learning...
The research questions <ul><li>What does the  term ‘Scholarship of Teaching’ mean to academics & the academic community? <...
Methodology <ul><li>Review of Boyer (1990) to revisit principal notions attached to ‘the scholarship of teaching’ & to gro...
Building on Boyer <ul><li>Nicholls built on Boyer’s (1990) foundation of interpreting the scholarship of teaching as an in...
Further definitions of SOTL <ul><li>While using Boyer as a foundation, Nicholls referred to: </li></ul><ul><li>Trigwell et...
SOTL & terminology <ul><li>Boyer and the ITL embrace different definitions of SOTL </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding why thi...
Use of Bourdieu & research findings <ul><li>Bourdieu postulated that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>social agents act as the condu...
Interviewing academics <ul><li>Boyer interviewed 25 academics in the UK about their perceptions of SOTL, guided by 5 quest...
Research findings <ul><li>Clear set of agreed terms relating to ‘scholarship’ emerged (we will consider these later) </li>...
Argument <ul><li>Academics are confused about the term ‘scholarship’ when it is applied to teaching & this impacts on thei...
Adding a local perspective <ul><li>UK academics (n = 25) </li></ul><ul><li>critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>problem sol...
Situating Nicholls’ findings in SOTL <ul><li>Deleuze and Guattari (1987): ‘principles of connection and heterogeneity … an...
Conclusion <ul><li>Weimer (2006): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ I worry that as we wallow around seeking to differentiate betwee...
References <ul><li>Bourke, C. and Bourke, E. (2002). Indigenous Studies: New pathways to development.  Journal of Australi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

ELT505 Presentation

725 views
664 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
725
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

ELT505 Presentation

  1. 1. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Situating Aboriginal Studies & critically appraising Nicholls (2004) Dr Kristyn Harman September 2009
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>‘ The work of the professor [University lecturer] becomes consequential only as it is understood by others’ (Boyer 1990). </li></ul><ul><li>How, then, might our University teaching – in theory and in practice – become consequential? </li></ul><ul><li>To begin to approach this issue is to engage in what has been termed ‘the Scholarship of Teaching’ – but what does this mean? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Structural outline <ul><li>Part one: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is Aboriginal Studies? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Situating Aboriginal Studies within SOTL </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Part two (Nicholls 2004): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introducing Nicholls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Methodology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research findings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Argument </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A local perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Situating Nicholls within SOTL </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Origins of Aboriginal Studies <ul><li>Emerged as an anthropologically-based course at a Perth teachers’ college in the mid-1950s </li></ul><ul><li>Initial emphasis: recording the details of a ‘dying race’ </li></ul><ul><li>1960s: field widened to include human biology, prehistory, and linguistics </li></ul>http://www1.aiatsis.gov.au/finding_aids/images/MS3752/conference1961.jpg National Conference on Aboriginal Studies, Canberra 1961 <ul><li>Aimed to give ‘voice’ to minorities (c.f. histories from below, women’s studies) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Aboriginal Studies: A dynamic field <ul><li>Changes over time in line with Government policy and federal/state/local politics </li></ul><ul><li>Aims shifted from giving voice to indigenous peoples and educating trainee teachers to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeking to redress enduring indigenous disadvantage with colonisation touted as sole cause (see Grossman (ed.) 2003; Maddison 2009); and/or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critically engaging with diverse complex issues, with multiple causation explanatory framework for enduring indigenous disadvantage (see Sutton 2009). </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Aboriginal Studies: A multi-disciplinary interchange
  7. 7. Aboriginal Studies & SOTL <ul><li>SOTL literature on teaching Aboriginal Studies pertains to primary & secondary school curricula </li></ul><ul><li>Dearth of SOTL literature on Aboriginal Studies at tertiary level (research opportunity) </li></ul><ul><li>Generic SOTL literature therefore important </li></ul><ul><li>Peer discussions also highly pertinent & relevant (within and beyond Aboriginal Studies) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Aboriginal Studies & SOTL @ UTAS <ul><li>Current emphasis on implementing CRA </li></ul><ul><li>Driven by compliance with policy, but also desire to engage in best practice </li></ul><ul><li>Rubrics designed for tutorial presentations and journals & training session run for tutors </li></ul><ul><li>Given rise to research project on best practice in co-ordinating & assessing tutorial presentations (literature review, interviews, personal experience) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Introducing Nicholls <ul><li>Professor Gill Nicholls </li></ul><ul><li>Currently Pro-Vice Chancellor, Academic, at Salford University, Manchester </li></ul><ul><li>Previous appointments at Durham University, King’s College, London, and Surrey University </li></ul><ul><li>Has published nine books, including Challenge to Scholarship (2006) </li></ul>http://www.corporate.salford.ac.uk/leadership-management/gill-nicholls/
  10. 10. Nicholls: The research problem <ul><li>In the UK, the Institute for Learning and Teaching [ILT] exists to enhance learning and teaching in higher education </li></ul><ul><li>Nicholls sought to critique the way in which the ILT promotes ‘a commitment to scholarship in teaching…’ as a professional value, asking what does this mean? </li></ul><ul><li>The issue is compounded by ‘Boyer’s untimely death’, which ‘left the concept [of SOTL] open to examination and reinterpretation’ (Nicholls 2004) </li></ul>
  11. 11. The research questions <ul><li>What does the term ‘Scholarship of Teaching’ mean to academics & the academic community? </li></ul><ul><li>Has the use of certain language to attach professional value to the scholarship of teaching led to confusion? </li></ul><ul><li>Do individual academics and disciplinary groups share similar or different conceptions of ‘the scholarship of teaching’? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Methodology <ul><li>Review of Boyer (1990) to revisit principal notions attached to ‘the scholarship of teaching’ & to ground the research findings </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Bourdieu’s (1986, 1988, 1989) concepts of symbolic cultural & social capital as theoretical framework to analyse how people may try to enhance the status & value of teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Interview with 25 academics & analysis of data to ascertain what they understood by ‘the scholarship of teaching’ </li></ul>
  13. 13. Building on Boyer <ul><li>Nicholls built on Boyer’s (1990) foundation of interpreting the scholarship of teaching as an integrated & inclusive activity entailing: </li></ul><ul><li>Synoptic capacity – drawing together diverse ideas to make coherent meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogical content knowledge – overcoming ‘split between intellectual substance and teaching process’ </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly enquiry into student learning </li></ul>
  14. 14. Further definitions of SOTL <ul><li>While using Boyer as a foundation, Nicholls referred to: </li></ul><ul><li>Trigwell et al (2000); and </li></ul><ul><li>Kreber (2002b) </li></ul><ul><li>to demonstrate that ‘a great deal more research is required … if the scholarship of teaching is to have clear, distinct and definitive meaning’ </li></ul>
  15. 15. SOTL & terminology <ul><li>Boyer and the ITL embrace different definitions of SOTL </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding why this difference is important is essential to appreciating Nicholls’ argument </li></ul><ul><li>Nicholls used Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital to critique the way SOTL has been used by the ITL as a ‘mechanism for promoting teaching in academic discourse’ </li></ul>
  16. 16. Use of Bourdieu & research findings <ul><li>Bourdieu postulated that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>social agents act as the conduits for power within societies (which are arbitrary); and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>different types of capital accrue in societies: social, symbolic and material. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social capital accrues through informal exchanges but this requires a cohesive group </li></ul><ul><li>Using the term ‘scholarship’ with ‘teaching’ can be seen as an attempt to create symbolic capital </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ILT teaching fellowships are an example – they emulate research fellowships </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Interviewing academics <ul><li>Boyer interviewed 25 academics in the UK about their perceptions of SOTL, guided by 5 questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you understand by the term Scholarship? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you perceive the scholarship of your discipline to be? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you understand by the Scholarship of Teaching? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do you think that there is a Scholarship of Teaching? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If yes what does the Scholarship of Teaching constitute for you? </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Research findings <ul><li>Clear set of agreed terms relating to ‘scholarship’ emerged (we will consider these later) </li></ul><ul><li>Academics from same discipline agreed on ‘scholarship’, but differences between disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Questions on SOTL hard to answer – most academics did not associate ‘scholarship’ with ‘teaching’ </li></ul><ul><li>20 out of 25 respondents had not heard of SOTL </li></ul>
  19. 19. Argument <ul><li>Academics are confused about the term ‘scholarship’ when it is applied to teaching & this impacts on their engagement </li></ul><ul><li>ITL has referred to scholarship as a professional value to accrue symbolic capital to HE teaching but confusion has led to this not being widely embraced </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring the term ‘Scholarship of Teaching’ further could be useful if a more systematic approach is taken & this could lead to greater engagement </li></ul>
  20. 20. Adding a local perspective <ul><li>UK academics (n = 25) </li></ul><ul><li>critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>problem solving </li></ul><ul><li>long-term view </li></ul><ul><li>produce new knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>share knowledge with others, including peers </li></ul><ul><li>use variety of avenues to disseminate knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>UTAS academics (n = 4) </li></ul><ul><li>engagement with theories of T & L </li></ul><ul><li>ascertain, apply & review best practice </li></ul><ul><li>knowledge of literature </li></ul><ul><li>dialogue with peers </li></ul><ul><li>reflection & research </li></ul><ul><li>making findings public </li></ul>
  21. 21. Situating Nicholls’ findings in SOTL <ul><li>Deleuze and Guattari (1987): ‘principles of connection and heterogeneity … any point of a rhizome can be connected to anything other’ </li></ul>Boyer (1990) The scholarship of teaching – dynamic, begins with what we know. Educates and entices future scholars. Trigwell et al (2000) – five hierarchical interpretations of SOT, from what teacher does to how students learn. Andresen (2000) – what, how, and why we teach. Critical reflection, peer review, inquiry (motivation). Elton (2008) – collaboration between lecturers and students; teaching not separate from research. Kreber (2002) – four distinct areas: discovery, excellent practice, knowledge, experience. Nicholls (2004) – believes discourse on SOT poorly conceptualised & confusing.
  22. 22. Conclusion <ul><li>Weimer (2006): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ I worry that as we wallow around seeking to differentiate between “excellent” teaching, “scholarly” (or informed) teaching, and the “scholarship of teaching” … the door of opportunity opened by Boyer’s notion that we can define scholarship differently will close before pedagogical scholarship manages to move inside.’ </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. References <ul><li>Bourke, C. and Bourke, E. (2002). Indigenous Studies: New pathways to development. Journal of Australian Studies , 26(74), 181-199. </li></ul><ul><li>Deleuze, G. and Guattari, F. (1987). One thousand plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia . Continuum, London. </li></ul><ul><li>Grossman, M. (ed.) (2003). Blacklines: Contemporary critical writing by Indigenous Australians . Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Maddison, S. (2009). Black Politics: Inside the Complexity of Aboriginal Political Culture. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin. </li></ul><ul><li>Nicholls, G. (2004). Scholarship in teaching as a core professional value: What does this mean to the academic? Teaching in Higher Education , 9(1), 29-42. </li></ul><ul><li>Sutton, P. (2009). The politics of suffering: Indigenous Australia and the end of the liberal consensus. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Weimer, M. (2006). Enhancing scholarly work on teaching and learning: Professional literature that makes a difference. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. </li></ul>

×