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How to use Desktop Wallpaper to Create a Veggie Eating Habit
 

How to use Desktop Wallpaper to Create a Veggie Eating Habit

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  • Some running comments . . .

    Slide 4 on Ability: Wow. This would be difficult to do -- having veggies always there. I wish I could do this myself, but I'd probably eat them quickly, not waiting for the official trigger. Curious about how you pulled this off.

    I agree the desktop wallpaper is a good 'Path' to use for triggering behavior.

    Good work for a short project. Certainly there are ways to keep exploring here . . .
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    How to use Desktop Wallpaper to Create a Veggie Eating Habit How to use Desktop Wallpaper to Create a Veggie Eating Habit Presentation Transcript

    • VeggiTop
      A conceptual design by
      Kristy Allenby & Marcus Catsouphes
      Design Challenge
      Encourage vegetable eating business school grad students to eat more of them over 5 days
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • VeggiTop
      Persuasive Purpose
      • Increase graduate business school students’ vegetable consumption by changing their computers’ desktop background for 5 days
      Industrial Design
      +
      =
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Our Users Are
      • Business school grad students who…
      • Already like vegetables
      • Want to increase consumption of vegetables
      • Own personal computers
      • Have habits of doing work every day at their desks
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • How it works…
      Setting Up the Cue: He sets the photo as his computer’s desktop background.
      Increasing Ability: Matt makes sure he has his favorite veggies on hand. He keeps a bowl of his favorite veggie on his desk next to his computer.
      Signing Up: Matt, a grad student, receives an email on Monday morning with a picture attached. The email explains that he should eat a vegetable each time he sees the picture on his desktop for the next 5 days.
      Flexing His Behavior: Every time Matt sees the desktop image during the week, he eats a vegetable from his bowl.
      Tracking Behavior: Each night for 5 days, Matt receives a text asking how many extra veggies he ate. He replies back to the text message.
      Following Up: One week later, Matt receives an email survey asking him some questions about the intervention’s effectiveness
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Prototype of VeggiTop
      We provide participants a chance to choose the desktop photos they like best. Some examples:
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Features/Functionality
      • Participants choose the image they feel will best motivate them, and they set it as their desktop
      • Participants place a bowl of vegetables next to their computers, so they are easily accessible
      • Progress is reported nightly via text message
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Theoretical Justifications
      • Our main research question is to find the simplest behavior that matters. Since these are flexbehaviors, we are hypothesizing that a very small cue may encourage the desired result
      • This design attempts to “piggy back” an increased vegetable consumption habit on business school students’ extensive daily computer usage
      • Because business school students sees their computers’ desktop background multiple times per day, the cue can be repeated a lot
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Results of User Testing
      Respondents Eating More Veggies
      Serving Increase Among Participants
      Day #
      Day#
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Shortcomings of Design
      • Unclear if the desktop will become “stale” after the 5 days are up (i.e. was the dip in performance we observed on day 5 indicative of decreasing returns)
      • Will users continue eating more veggies after the intervention has completed?
      • Sending follow-up emails & tracking participation becomes tiring
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Expansion - What else is possible?
      • This project helped us to show…
      • A very small behavior change can lead to formation of a new health habit
      • The viability of a “low touch” solution that can be easily expanded (e.g. it’s easy to allow many people to download backgrounds)
      • Desktop wallpaper might be an overlooked intervention opportunity
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu
    • Next Steps in Design Process
      • Explore ways to automate the “check-in” emails and tracking process
      • Identify other health habits that could be motivated using desktop background changes
      • Collect longitudinal information to see if participants continued new habits after the intervention ended
      Stanford University, Spring 2010
      CS377v - Creating Health Habits
      habits.stanford.edu