Vygotsky

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Spontaneous Concepts

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  • Les Vygotsky was born in Russia in 1896. He died in 1934, leaving a huge amount of his work that is being studied today.
  • Vygotsky

    1. 1. Vygotsky Spontaneous Concepts
    2. 2. Vygotsky’s Views <ul><li>Vygotsky views spontaneous concepts as what children learn without specific instructions. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Vygotsky’s Reasons <ul><li>Since Vygotsky does not deny that adults are involved, he calls these concepts, “everyday” concepts. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Vygotsky’s Reason’s (cont’d) <ul><li>Vygotsky wanted to avoid the misconception that the child happened to just come up with something. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Spontaneous/Scientific Concepts <ul><li>He did not entirely separate the two beliefs. </li></ul><ul><li>he acknowledged that they each possessed different traits. </li></ul><ul><li>Vygotsky felt that the spontaneous and scientific concepts complimented each other. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Origination <ul><li>In looking at Vygotsky’s definition of spontaneous concepts (Welling,Paula, Life Learning: The developments of spontaneous concepts,pg.6), we find that spontaneous concepts are obtained straight from the experiences that people have while interacting in the world of everyday living. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Illustration of Spontaneous Concepts <ul><li>These concepts “reflect the folk-wisdom, common sense, and everyday beliefs and understandings that people live with but rarely articulate.”(Wells,Paula, Life Learning: The developments of spontaneous concepts,pg.7). </li></ul>
    8. 8. Concession <ul><li>Vygotsky does concede that spontaneous concepts are hard to reason with. </li></ul>

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