Plot

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This presentation is designed to cover the story element of plot for 3rd-5th grade students.

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  • Image credit - open book free clip art: http://www.clker.com/clipart-9706.html
  • PLOT -- The plot is how the author arranges events to develop his basic idea; It is the sequence of events in a story or play. The plot is a planned, logical series of events having a beginning, middle, and end. The short story usually has one plot so it can be read in one sitting. There are five essential parts of plot: a) Introduction - The beginning of the story where the characters and the setting is revealed. b) Rising Action - This is where the events in the story become complicated and the conflict in the story is revealed (events between the introduction and climax). c) Climax - This is the highest point of interest and the turning point of the story. The reader wonders what will happen next; will the conflict be resolved or not? d) Falling action - The events and complications begin to resolve themselves. The reader knows what has happened next and if the conflict was resolved or not (events between climax and denouement). e) Resolution (Denouement) - This is the final outcome or untangling of events in the story. References: Engram, J.A. (N.D.). Short Story Elements. Retrieved from: http: //hrsbstaff . ednet .ns. ca/engramja/elements .html Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • Resource: http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/plot.htm Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • View climax as a three-fold phenomenon: 1) the main character receives new information 2) accepts this information (realizes it but does not necessarily agree with it) 3) acts on this information (makes a choice that will determine whether or not he/she gains his objective). References: Engram, J.A. (N.D.). Short Story Elements. Retrieved from: http: //hrsbstaff . ednet .ns. ca/engramja/elements .html Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • Falling action - The events and complications begin to resolve themselves. The reader knows what has happened next and if the conflict was resolved or not (events between climax and denouement). References: Engram, J.A. (N.D.). Short Story Elements. Retrieved from: http: //hrsbstaff . ednet .ns. ca/engramja/elements .html Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • Resolution or Denouement - This is the final outcome or untangling of events in the story. References: Engram, J.A. (N.D.). Short Story Elements. Retrieved from: http: //hrsbstaff . ednet .ns. ca/engramja/elements .html Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62
  • Use the plot diagram to fill in information from Henry Huggins: Introduction - meet Henry and Ribsy First problem - get Ribsy home. Solution - put him in a box; be taken home by policeman Second problem - Too many guppies. Solution - sell them back to pet store Third problem - Lose Scooter’s football. Solution - sell nightcrawlers to buy a new one; man brings it back. Fourth problem - Getting the part of “little boy” in the play. Solution - Ribsy dumps green paint on Henry so he doesn’t have to play the part. Fifth problem - Entering Ribsy in the dog show and the talcum powder turns him pink. Solution - Ribsy wins “Most Unusual Dog” Climax - Ribsy’s original owner comes to get Ribsy back. Falling action - They put Ribsy in the middle to let him choose which kid to go with, Henry or the original owner. Resolution - Ribsy chooses Henry and the kids go off to play.
  • Plot

    1. 1. Plot Copyright 2011, Kristin Ewing, non-commercial educational use
    2. 2. Plot Diagram Photo credit: Some rights reserved by gigi 62 Rising Action Conflict Conflict Conflict Climax Falling Introduction Resolution Action
    3. 3. Plot Introduction Introduction <ul><li>The beginning of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Meet the main character and their problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about the setting. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Plot Rising Action and Conflict <ul><li>The middle of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>The problems and solutions the main character faces. </li></ul><ul><li>What happens in the story. </li></ul>Rising Action Conflict Conflict Conflict
    5. 5. Plot Climax <ul><li>Turning point in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Main character receives new information, </li></ul><ul><li>Accepts the new information, </li></ul><ul><li>Makes a choice using the information. </li></ul>Climax
    6. 6. Plot Falling Action <ul><li>Moving towards the end of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts are resolved and reader knows what happened. </li></ul>Falling Action
    7. 7. Plot Resolution <ul><li>The end of the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Wraps up all the loose ends or sets the scene for a new book. </li></ul>Resolution
    8. 8. Henry Huggins Plot Diagram
    9. 9. Information for Plot Diagram Introduction - meet Henry and Ribsy First problem - get Ribsy home. Solution - put him in a box; be taken home by policeman Second problem - Too many guppies. Solution - sell them back to pet store Third problem - Lose Scooter’s football. Solution - sell nightcrawlers to buy a new one; man brings it back. Fourth problem - Getting the part of “little boy” in the play. Solution - Ribsy dumps green paint on Henry so he doesn’t have to play the part. Fifth problem - Entering Ribsy in the dog show and the talcum powder turns him pink. Solution - Ribsy wins “Most Unusual Dog” Climax - Ribsy’s original owner comes to get Ribsy back. Falling action - They put Ribsy in the middle to let him choose which kid to go with, Henry or the original owner. Resolution - Ribsy chooses Henry and the kids go off to play.

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